Tag:San Jose Sharks
Posted on: September 28, 2011 10:03 am
Edited on: September 28, 2011 10:27 am
 

Daily Skate: Doughty stalemate, K.C. auditions

By Brian Stubits

STANDING STRONG: There's a lot more going on these days, but don't forget that Drew Doughty is still not in camp with the Kings, stuck in a contract stalemate. President of the Kings' parent company Tim Leiweke is on GM Dean Lombardi's side in an informative conversatoin with Helene St. James. (L.A. Times)

KANSAS CITY AUDITIONS: Once again Kansas City played host to an NHL exhbition game and once again the city showed well for the game between the Penguins and Kings with 17,779 packing the Sprint Center. But the latest audition still doesn't do much to boost the city's chase for a new team. (Kansas City Star)

DON'T I KNOW YOU? Not everybody hates Sean Avery, the New York Rangers' world-reknowned pest. Check out this look-alike fan in Prague, where the Rangers are getting ready for their season opener. What's one thing Petr Rada likes about Avery? "He's a very funny guy." I'm curious how many agree to that. (NHL.com)

THRILL FROM KIRIL: Looking to get a roller-hockey game going on Long Island, one of the players realized they were short a man. Being friends on Facebook with Kirill Kabanov of the Islanders, one player decided to take a shot in the dark and ask Kabonov to join them. Next thing you know, the Isles prospect was there, creating one Wild roller game. (New York Times)

SPEECH THERAPY: There has been a ton of discourse regarding Wayne Simmonds (apparent but not proven) use of a gay slur on the ice. Here's an excellent one from Bruce Arthur asking why, if the NHL can get rid of the dangerous hits in its league it can't get rid of other hurtful actions. (National Post)

MOVING ON UP: That didn't take long. The No. 2 overall pick in this summer's draft, Gabriel Landeskog to the Avalanche, was declared the most NHL-ready prospect there was. Now he's showing it. The Swede has already worked his way on to the top line in Colorado with Paul Stastny and David Jones. (Denver Post)

SHARK CENSORSHIP: For many years you have been able to see shirts near the penalty box and benches in San Jose for Bad Boys Bail Bonds. The owner, a long-time season ticket holder, advertised with the team last year but didn't renew, saying the exposure wasn't worth it. Now the Sharks are banning patrons from promoting or marketing their businesses. There are some unhappy people. (Puck Daddy)

NOTHING BUT NET: In an attempt to help fans see the action on the ice through the mesh netting, the Capitals tried something new on Monday at the Verizon Center, debuting a new white net, hoping it would blend in better and be less obtrusive. Early returns from the fans say not so much. It could be back to normal sooner than you'd think. (Capitals Insider)

JUST SHOOT ME: If the Predators are looking to increase their scoring on the power play, there's a pretty simple suggestion: shoot more! Here's a breakdown of how often (or little) Nashville is shooting with the man advanatage among other Western Conference teams. (Pred Gold)

BACK ALREADY: It was just on Monday when it was said that Avalanche defenseman Jan Hejda was expected to miss a couple of weeks with a knee injury. Yet on Tuesday Hejda was right back on the ice, joining the Avs in practice without skipping a beat. Just in case you didn't believe it, Adrian Dater included some video. (Denver Post)

Photo: Dan Rosen

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 27, 2011 11:48 pm
Edited on: September 27, 2011 11:49 pm
 

Nabokov makes Islanders preseason debut

NabokovBy: Adam Gretz

After spending the 2010-11 season playing in the KHL and sitting in limbo while refusing to report to the New York Islanders, Evgeni Nabokov made his preseason debut for the team on Tuesday night, stopping 15 of the 16 shots he faced in two periods of play during their 2-0 loss to the Calgary Flames.

Last summer Nabokov signed a four-year, $24 million deal with SKA St. Petersburg of the KHL after spending 10 productive seasons with the San Jose Sharks. His KHL experience proved to be a disappointing one, posting a .888 save percentage in 22 appearances (by comparison: the other two goalies on his team were both over .900 for the season) before he and the team mutually parted ways in December.

At that point Nabokov attempted to make a return to the NHL, signing a one-year deal with the Detroit Red Wings. Because he had spent part of the season playing overseas he had to pass through waivers before he could play for Detroit, and the Islanders, in desperate need of a goaltender after a series of trades (Dwayne Roloson) and injuries, put a claim in for him. Nabokov ultimately refused to report and didn't play again in 2011.

He later said that his decision to not join the Islanders had nothing to do with his unwillingness to play for the team, and more to do with the fact that he hadn't skated in nearly two months and didn't feel he could help the team in what was -- at that time -- a playoff push.

Here's what he told Newsday prior to training camp:
“What made me make that decision is that I hadn’t skated for a month-and-a-half when they claimed me. They were out of the playoffs, but battling to get in and, as a goalie, I know the goalie position is important when fighting for position [in the standings],” Nabokov said. “I didn’t feel that I could help them to get to the playoffs. I needed three to four weeks to get ready and the season would’ve been over.”

“I was not feeling the strongest and Detroit was in a totally different position,” Nabokov said. “They were going to the playoffs and willing to wait. The Islanders needed help then.”

Still under contract with the Islanders, he reported to camp this season and is competing for a roster spot to go along with the oft-injured Rick DiPietro.

He finally made his first appearance on Tuesday, and for the most part things went well playing behind a roster that dressed few NHL regulars and a number of prospects and minor leaguers. He did allow a shorthanded goal to Curtis Glencross at the 4:10 mark of the second period, but stopped every other shot he faced on the night.

The most frustrating part of his performance, if you're an Islanders fan, is that he seemed to make things more difficult for himself and his teammates by turning the puck over on a number of occassions, especially in the first period, while attempting to play it.

It should be interesting to see what plans the Islanders have for Nabokov. Will he compete for the No. 1 job with DiPietro? Will they look to use him as a chip in the trading market? Or will they go with him as DiPietro's backup as a veteran insurance policy in case of an injury? Either way, Tuesday night was a promising start.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: September 26, 2011 5:15 pm
Edited on: September 27, 2011 9:54 am
 

Pacific Division Preview: San Jose still on top

Sharks1

By: Adam Gretz

The San Jose Sharks have comfortably controlled the Pacific Division the past four seasons, winning it each year by an average margin of about 11 points.

Regular season success hasn't been much of an issue for the Sharks, reaching the 100-point mark six of the past seven seasons. The issue has always been whether or not they can avoid what seemed to be an annual early exit from the playoffs. They've done some work to help break their negative postseason reputation the past two years, reaching the conference finals each year before ultimately losing to Chicago and Vancouver respectively.

Will this be the year they finally break through and win the Conference? Will they be able to continue their dominance within the division, or did their four divisional rivals do enough to catch up this summer?

The Pacific was the only division in the NHL last season to produce four playoff teams, as Anaheim, Phoenix and Los Angeles joined the Sharks in the postseason. The Ducks boast the NHL's reigning MVP in Corey Perry, while the Los Angeles Kings made what was perhaps the biggest addition in the Western Conference by acquiring Mike Richards in an offseason blockbuster trade with the Philadelphia Flyers.

Pacific Division (In order of predicted finish)

SharksSan Jose Sharks: The Sharks avoided disaster in the second round of the playoffs last season by escaping with a Game 7 win over the Detroit Red Wings after watching a 3-0 series lead slip away, advancing to the Conference Finals for the second year in a row where they lost to the Canucks in five games. General manager Doug Wilson made a few significant changes to his roster this summer by sacrificing a bit of offense (Devin Setoguchi) to get a defensive upgrade in Brent Burns, while also sending Dany Heatley, a player that is coming his worst goal-scoring season since his rookie year, to Minnesota for Martin Havlat.

Strengths: Even after trading Dany Heatley and Devin Setoguchi the Sharks still have two outstanding lines with Joe Thornton, Patrick Marleau, Martin Havlat, Joe Pavelski and Logan Couture. Boyle, Burns, Marc Eduard Vlasic and Douglas Murray is a strong top-four on the blue line that combines offensive ability (Boyle and Burns) and strong defensive play (Marc-Edouard Vlasic and Douglas Murray, who also happens to be one of the biggest hitters in the league). They have an outstanding power play that should still be a force even with the loss of Heatley and his 11 power play goals from a year ago. Burns (eight power play goals a year ago) gives them another weapon on the point to go along with Boyle.

Weaknesses: The third and fourth lines aren't great, and the injury questions surrounding goaltenders Antti Niemi and Antero Niittymaki should be a concern early in the season, but should go away once Niemi returns to the lineup, and may be as early as the season opener. Penalty kill was a major problem last season -- can the addition of Michal Handzus make a difference?

KingsLos Angeles Kings: The Kings haven't advanced beyond the first round of the Western Conference playoffs in over a decade, and have only won one playoff series since reaching the Stanley Cup Finals all the way back in 1993. This roster, on paper, looks to be their best chance for postseason success -- assuming they finally work out something with unsigned defenseman Drew Doughty. For years we've been waiting for the Kings to make a big move given their tradable assets and cap space, and they finally pulled off the blockbuster trade this summer by acquiring Mike Richards from the Philadelphia Flyers.

Strengths: If you believe championship teams are built down the middle, then the Los Angeles Kings should have a great foundation. Already having Anze Kopitar on the roster, the Kings added Richards, one of the best two-way centers in the NHL, back in June in exchange for Wayne Simmonds, Brayden Schenn and a draft pick. Combine those two with Jarret Stoll, and the Kings top-three centers should be able to match up with just about any team in the Western Conference. Thanks to steady stay-at-home defensemen like Rob Scuderi and Willie Mitchell the Kings had one of the top penalty killing units in the league last season.

On the wings Dustin Penner, Dustin Brown, Justin Williams and Simon Gagne help create what should be an improved offense over the one that finished 25th in goals scored last season.

Weaknesses: As of this moment the biggest weakness for the Kings might be the fact that their best defenseman, Drew Doughty, remains unsigned as a restricted free agent, and with each passing day we're one day closer to him missing games that actually count in the standings. The power play needs to improve, finishing just 21st in the NHL last season.

DucksAnaheim Ducks: Without looking it up, do you know which player led all NHL defensemen in scoring last season? Nicklas Lidstrom? Shea Weber? Maybe Dan Boyle? Try again. It was Anaheim's Lubomir Visnovsky, giving the Ducks the NHL's top-scoring defenseman as well as the leading goal-scorer (Corey Perry, the only player to hit the 50-goal mark).

Strengths:  Corey Perry. Ryan Getzlaf. Bobby Ryan. Teemu Selanne. Those four players combined for nearly 60 percent of Anaheim's goals in 2010-11, and that was with one of them, Getzlaf, missing 15 games. Perry, who finished as the NHL's leading goal-scorer and won his first MVP award, probably isn't going to score 50 goals again, and Selanne is a year older (but still productive) but this is still an excellent quartet of forwards.

Weaknesses: Which forwards after the four mentioned above can provide offense?

Jonas Hiller is an excellent goaltender when he's in the lineup, but how much will his battle with vertigo impact him this season? If he has to miss any extended time the options behind him (Dan Ellis is currently the backup) aren't really all that promising.

The defense can certainly provide some offense with Lubomir Visnovsky, who is coming off a career year with 68 points, and Cam Fowler having a very promising rookie season -- from an offensive perspective -- with 10 goals and 30 assists, but questions remain as to how good they can be in their own zone.

StarsDallas Stars: There are disappointing ways to finish a season, and then there's what the Dallas Stars did to close out the 2010-11 season, losing nine of their final 14 games to miss the playoffs -- the only team in the division to do so -- by just one point. All they had to do on the final day of the regular season was beat the Minnesota Wild, a team that had completely gone in the tank and won just seven of its final 22 games. The Stars lost, 5-3, allowing the Chicago Blackhawks to clinch the No. 8 spot.

Strengths: Some very good forwards with players like Louii Eriksson and Jamie Benn leading the way, and Mike Ribiero still gives them a No. 1 center in the absence of Brad Richards who signed a huge deal with the New York Rangers in free agency. Based on his play after coming over in a mid-season trade with the Pittsburgh Penguins, Alex Goligoski looks like he could be on the verge of a breakout season.

Weaknesses: Losing Brad Richards to free agency is a big blow, even with Mike Ribiero -- who trailed Richards by just six points last season -- still on the roster. No disrespect to Steve Ott, who is a fine all-around player, but a 1-2 punch of Richards and Ribiero down the middle is more dangerous than Ribiero-Ott from an offensive perspective.

Mediocre special teams a year ago with the Power Play finishing middle of the pack and the penalty kill in the bottom seven.

CoyotesPhoenix Coyotes: Yes, the Coyotes are still here, and yes, they're looking to make the playoffs for a third consecutive season after having been eliminated by Detroit in each of the past two seasons. They locked up one of their most important players to a long-term contract extension by signing Keith Yandle to a five-year deal this summer, but also said goodbye to another key player in goaltender Ilya Bryzgalov.

Strengths: Dave Tippett has done a masterful job the past two seasons with the Coyotes taking a team in a financial mess with little star power to speak of and helping to get them to the playoffs each year with a disciplined, defensive style that the players have bought in to. Keith Yandle is one of the best up-and-coming defenseman in the NHL,

Weaknesses:Replacing Bryzgalov with Mike Smith and Jason LaBarbera seems like a significant drop in talent. The one thing Phoenix does have going for it here is that it has a tight defensive system and some excellent two-way players, while Smith has past experience playing in Tippett's system. Still, will that be enough to overcome the loss of Bryzgalov? The Coyotes don't have a true big-time goal-scorer on the roster, but did manage to have 11 different players score at least 10 goals last season. Three of those players (Lee Stempniak, Eric Belanger and Scottie Upshall) are gone, and another, Kyle Turris, is holding out with some absurd contract demands.

NHL season preview schedule
Wed., Sept. 21: Step-back players Tues., Sept. 27: Atlantic Division
Thur., Sept. 22: Breakout players Wed., Sept. 28: Central Division
Fri., Sept. 23: Southeast Division Thur. Sept. 29: Northeast Division
Mon., Sept. 26: Pacific Division Fri., Sept. 30: Northwest Division

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: September 23, 2011 9:58 am
 

Sharks lose Niittymaki for 12 weeks

Antero1By: Adam Gretz

The San Jose Sharks seem to be running out of goaltenders, and due to a couple of recent surgical procedures they could find themselves in a position where their starting goaltender is Thomas Greiss when they open the regular season on Oct. 8 against the Phoenix Coyotes.

Antti Niemi's status is still unknown at this point as he continues to recover from having a cyst removed during the offseason, and according to David Pollack of the San Jose Mercury News, he's not sure if he'll be ready for the season opener. Niemi, of course, is the Sharks No. 1 goaltender and is coming off a 2010-11 season that saw him finish with a .920 save percentage which resulted in him signing a four-year, $15.2 million contract extension this summer.

If Niemi were to miss any time, his backup, Antero Niittymaki would figure to fill in. The only problem with that is that he will be out of the lineup for the next 12 weeks after undergoing a surgical procedure to help relieve lingering pain from a lower body injury he suffered last season. That means Greiss, a third-round pick by the Sharks in 2004, will get the majority of the work throughout the remainder of the preseason and should, at the very least, open the season as San Jose's No. 2 goaltender, and perhaps its starter if Niemi isn't quite ready.

In 24 games last season Niittymaki recorded a .896 save percentage.

Greiss spent last season playing in the Swedish Elite League with Brynas IF Gavle. He's appeared in just 19 NHL games over parts of two seasons, and most recently played for the Sharks during the 2009-10 season, appearing in 16 games.

Assuming Niemi's injury doesn't linger and he's ready to go early in the season the situation shouldn't be that big of a concern, as the dropoff from Niittymaki to Greiss in the backup role shouldn't be that large, if it's even a drop at all. If Niemi isn't ready, however, the goaltending situation could be problematic in the early going for a team that's won four straight division titles.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: September 21, 2011 12:05 pm
Edited on: September 21, 2011 12:11 pm
 

Step-back players: Can Columbus' Wiz keep it up?

By Brian Stubits

We see it over and over again in sports. Player has a career year, player gets a fat new contract with new team, said player fails to live up to the new deal.

After an offseason of numerous exorbitant contracts, this description will likely apply to plenty of players this upcoming year. That includes the guy who received the biggest bounty on the first day of free agency, James Wisniewski.

Signed by the Columbus Blue Jackets for a robust six-year, $33 million, Wisniewski is the second-highest paid player on an annual basis on a team that includes Rick Nash and Jeff Carter. That's a lot of coin for a player who has one season on his resume worthy of such. In his defense it was last season, so he picked a good time for his best season.

But surely you can see the red flags here. Wisniewski would appear to be a prime target for a step-back season. Now it's possible that last season was the Wiz actually stepping into his prime, after all he is 27 years old now, the magical age in all sports. But when a guy scores 21 more points in a season higher than his previous career high, it is only fair to wonder if it can be repeated. Such a jump indicates likelihood to regress to the mean a little bit.

Throw in the fact that Wisniewski is coming to a new environment, joining players he has never played with before and in an organization that has not had much success to talk about and you have the making for much quieter year.

What could help Wisniewski replicate his 51 points from a season ago with the Canadiens would be getting a lot of ice time, especially on the power play, with Rick Nash and Jeff Carter. Depending on how quickly they jell up front could impact Wisniewski's play and numbers. He'll certainly share the ice with the two high- scoring forwards a bit, but the more (probably) the better.

Now is as good a time as any to explain the rationale here, because it always gets misunderstood. This is no way to say that Wisniewski or any of the other players below will have bad years. That isn't the object one bit. It's simply players who might see a regression. Think of it this way: If a player is great and he regresses, he can still be very good. That fit Alexander Ovechkin last season, despite still being one of the best players in the league, it can't be argued he didn't have as strong a season last year. Now, on to the ...

Step-back candidates

Michael Grabner/Taylor Hall/Logan Couture/Jeff Skinner/Tyler Seguin/Brad Marchand: We're just throwing all of last season's top rookies into one category and labeling this one the "sophomore slump" group. Chances are one of them won't continue to blossom or match their rookie outputs. If I had to pick one, it would be Grabner of the Islanders.

Teemu Selanne, Ducks: The guy is a wonder, recording more than a point per game last season with the Ducks at 40 years old. But his offseason knee surgery and subsequent wait to see if he'd be ready to go (and advanced age) would seem to indicate a player who doesn't seem likely to keep up his pace. Just playing the odds on this one. Then again, we are talking about Selanne here.


Danny Briere, Flyers: Somebody is likely going to suffer a setback in Philadelphia with the absence of Jeff Carter and Mike Richards, and Briere would be my best guess. He posted 34 goals and 34 assists last season, his highest point total in since 2007-08 and he's no spring chicken any more as he will turn 34 years old on the Flyers' opening day.


Christian Ehrhoff, Sabres: He is coming off a season where he posted 14 goals and 36 assists along with a plus-19. That in and of itself is tough to repeat. My colleague Adam Gretz wrote about the prospect of replacing Ehrhoff in Vancouver, noting that he was a bit protected. Now he will still be surrounded by a very good team in Buffalo, but it's looking like he will be paired with Jordan Leopold, the second defensive pairing behind Tyler Myers and Robyn Regehr. It's going to be very tough to replicate his excellent last two seasons.


Michal Neuvirth, Capitals: This is the gamble the Caps are taking by bringing in Tomas Vokoun. Neuvirth was very solid last season, posting a 27-12-4 record with a 2.45 GAA and .914 save percentage. They are risking him taking a step back in his growth as a player by relegating him to backup minutes, not to mention the possibility of a hit to the psyche of bringing in another goaltender and naming him the starter soon after the acquisition.


Sean Bergenheim, Panthers: He had the best season of his career with the Lightning a season ago, scoring 14 goals and 15 assists through 80 regular-season games. Where he drew plenty of attention for himself, though, was in the playoffs when he had nine goals for the Bolts. Coming up with the Islanders there had been plenty of hope and potential for Bergenheim, so perhaps he's just starting to break out. I'm expecting a point total in the low 20s, like his numbers in the days on the Island.


NHL season preview schedule
Wed., Sept. 21: Step-back players Tues., Sept. 27: Atlantic Division
Thur., Sept. 22: Breakout players Wed., Sept. 28: Central Division
Fri., Sept. 23: Southeast Division Thur. Sept. 29: Northeast Division
Mon., Sept. 26: Pacific Division Fri., Sept. 30: Northwest Division

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 15, 2011 10:53 am
Edited on: September 15, 2011 10:54 am
 

Daily Skate: Shark questions, examining enforcers

By Brian Stubits

MAKEOVER CONCERNS: Not everybody is digging what the Sharks have done this offseason in making over the roster in an attempt to finally get over the hump. David Pollack at the San Jose Mercury News says it raises questions ... how often does an elite team undergo such change? That's just one.

ENFORCING CHANGE: In the ongoing discussion on fighting, Kukla's Korner says that it's not very realistic to expect fighting to be removed from the NHL anytime soon. Instead, the way to curb fighting is to change today's role of the enforcer, instead expecting them to be contributing players beyond using their fists.

THE HEX IS BACK: There is another Hextall in hockey (L.A. Times). Brett Hextall, the son of Ron, was drafted by the Coyotes in the sixth round of the 2008 draft and he hit the ice against his dad's team, the Kings (Ron is assistant GM in L.A. these days). Brett, a forward, was physical on the ice. Surprise, surprise.

OTTAWA OPTIMISM: Senators GM Bryan Murray recently did a Q&A with the Ottawa Sun in which he talked about the team this upcoming season and the transition from Cory Clouston (with some more veiled parting shots) to Paul MacLean and Murray's belief the Sens will push for the playoffs ... this season.

TURRIS TAKE: After the flurry of signings on Wednesday and Thursday, the list of remaining RFAs unsigned is short, but the Coyotes' Kyle Turris is still on the list. With his high asking price ($3 million- $4million?!), it has Matthew Sekeres at the Globe and Mail wondering if it isn't a trade request in disguise.

ISLAND DEVELOPMENT: A Baltimore development company is showing renewed interest (Newsday) in developing the area around the Islanders home, Nassau Coliseum, something it originally showed interest in back in 2005. It's still too early to know what the full plan would call for and what it would mean to the Isles.

HUDLER'S HOPE: Coming off a disappointing season with the Red Wings, Jiri Hudler returns to Detroit this fall knowing he has to make a much better impression (Detroit Free Press), putting a lot of pressure on himself to show more than he did a season ago after a summer of UFC training.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 8, 2011 10:42 pm
 

Report: Kyle Wellwood signs with Jets

By: Adam Gretz

The Winnipeg Jets reportedly agreed to a one-year, $700,000 deal with free agent center Kyle Wellwood on Thursday night, according to Ken Wiebe of the Winnipeg Sun. The Jets haven't officially announced the move, but Wellwood's name did appear on the team's roster on its official website, before quickly being removed.

The 28-year-old Wellwood spent last season with the San Jose Sharks and scored five goals in 35 regular season games, before recording seven points in 18 playoff games. For his career, which has also included time with the Toronto Maple Leafs (the team that drafted him) and Vancouver Canucks, he's scored 68 goals in 373 games.

For a team that doesn't have a ton of depth down the middle it could prove to be a solid depth move, as Wellwood can add some decent offense from a bottom-six role and is a strong presence in the face-off circle.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: September 1, 2011 12:41 pm
 

Gary Roberts's Molten Chocolate Mousse

ChocolateBy: Adam Gretz

How can you tell we're looking forward to the start of a new hockey season? We're reviewing items off of the Gary Roberts menu featured in Sunday's Globe and Mail to help pass the time and count down the days.

If nothing else, I wanted to taste some new dishes, and the hockey connection just adds even more incentive to try them.

On Tuesday I cooked up a batch of Roasted Red Pepper Mayonnaise and came away very impressed. On Wednesday I decided to go with Gary Roberts's Molten Chocolate Mousse (pictured), which is mainly bananas and cacao powder. I figure I like chocolate, I like bananas, so it has to be good, right?

Let's find out.

What You Will Need:
Four bananas, 1/4 cup cacao powder, water.

With four bananas you're definitely going to get your fix of potassium for the day. As for the cacao powder, I picked up a box from the local natural food store; it'll run you about $8.

Recipe And Prep Time: It's pretty simple, if you can peel bananas, use a measuring cup and add everything to a blender until it's mixed together. The entire thing from start to finish takes no more than five minutes.

Overall Review: The first thing you notice about this shake is that it is thick, so thick that it could probably be consumed with a spoon with no problem. After taking the first sip my initial reaction was to throw the rest of the pitcher away and burn the blender it was prepared in. It was strong, and didn't have the taste I imagined it would have (which is odd, seeing as how there's only three ingredients). I gave it another shot and with each sip the taste started to come around a little, to the point I was able to finish most of it. I can't say it's something I would want to drink regularly, but it ended up finishing much better than it started.

If It Were A Hockey Player: It would be Ryane Clowe of the San Jose Sharks. Great size, tends to start off a little slow but ends up rebounding quite well to be very useful.

Photo from: My kitchen

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com