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Tag:New York Rangers
Posted on: December 14, 2011 12:18 am
Edited on: December 14, 2011 12:28 am
 

Tortorella was not happy with this charging call

By: Adam Gretz

The protection of goalies has been a hot topic in the NHL this season and it all started when Boston's Milan Lucic ran over Ryan Miller in a game back in November. During Tuesday's New York Rangers-Dallas Stars game, which the Stars won by a 1-0 margin thanks to a late third period goal from Trevor Daley and the first career shutout for rookie goalie Richard Bachman, Bachman left his crease in an effort to knock a loose puck away from Rangers forward Carl Hagelin.

There was a collision that resulted in Bachman losing his mask and being knocked to the ice, while Hagelin was assessed a two-minute minor for charging. It again needs to be pointed out that goalies, whether they're in the crease or out of the crease, are not fair game to be hit, and if the opposing team's skater doesn't make an effort to avoid the contact, the proper penalty is to be assessed.

That's not necessarily what happened with this incident, as evey replay angle shows that not only did Hagelin make an effort to avoid making contact with the Stars goalie, he's not even the player that made the actual contact with him -- it was Bachman's own teammate, defenseman Alex Goligoski, that hit him.

No penalty should have been called, and Rangers coach John Tortorella had a bit of an eruption on the bench, and rightfully so.



It's a good bet that shouting match is going to make an appearance on an episode of HBO's 24/7.

After the game, Tortorella said "The goalie came out 20 feet. Sometimes they feel they have to call something. It should've been a non-call."

He's absolutely right.

(H/T PHT for video)

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: December 12, 2011 3:16 pm
 

Lightning's Downie only fined for role in scrum

By Brian Stubits

The Lightning's Steve Downie managed to avoid a suspension for his role in a skirmish last week in a game against the Rangers where it appeared as though Downie illegally left the bench to take part. If that were the case, it would have been an automatic suspension.

Instead, Downie told the media on Monday that he was fined by the NHL, not suspended. While he didn't say how much he was fined, the largest possible fine he could receive is $2,500. It's likely that's what he was docked.

For a refresher on what happened, Artem Anisimov of the Rangers scored short-handed and then decided to celebrate by using his stick like a gun and firing at the Lightning net and Mathieu Garon. Here's the video.

The question with regards to Downie became was he on the ice because of a legal line change? Despite not technically being on the ice when the fight began, the league came to the conclusion that it was a legal line change and Downie had a right to be in the game. He was replacing the dinged up Brett Connolly.

Still, the way he was slow to get in the game then react suddenly and go flying across the rink to join the fracas didn't look too good for him, especially considering Downie's less-than stellar reputation.

"It's what I expected," Downie said. "It is what it is. You've got to respect the decision. It's not my call but I expect what he did and what he said."

Sure could have been a lot worse. Judging by past situations with guys hopping off the bench illegally, it was a possibility that Downie could face a severe suspension.

More NHL Discipline News Here

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: December 12, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: December 12, 2011 12:36 pm
 

Show to follow NHL players, starting with Kane

By Brian Stubits

There is no denying the success of sports reality shows (the real ones, not shows like Pros vs. Joes). Best I can remember, it all started with HBO's Hard Knocks series where the cameras followed an NFL team through training camp. The show has been a hit every season it has been on.

Then last year HBO showed it can work just as well with hockey, running the 24/7: Road to the Winter Classic series featuring the Washington Capitals and Pittsburgh Penguins. It, too, was a big hit so HBO is rolling out the series again this year, debuting on Wednesday of this week featuring the New York Rangers and Philadelphia Flyers. The excitement is high, people can't wait to see more of what we watched last year.

So clearly, inside-the-ropes shows are all the rage these days. That's why the NHL is getting in on the act in another way, launching NHL 36, a 30-minute show to air on Versus that will follow an NHL player through a normal day. The pilot episode will feature Patrick Kane of the Chicago Blackhawks.

And wouldn't you know it, the show is set to air this Wednesday, Dec. 14. As in the same day as the HBO series. But they won't compete, so you can catch both. NHL 36 will air before the national game on Versus, so it will be shown at 6:30 ET.

Here's more from the press release.

Providing the ultimate behind-the-scenes peek into the life of this NHL superstar, NHL 36 takes viewers into Kane's world for 36 straight hours as he lives the life of a not-so-average 23-year-old. Through an array of microphones and isolated cameras, the 30-minute documentary will offer unique insight into Kane's game on the ice. The show also will feature interviews with Kane's family.

"We are excited about the opportunity to create individual player portraits with unprecedented depth -- at home with family, out with friends and in the workplace," said Ross Greenburg, executive producer, NHL 36. "Wherever they go, whatever they do, our cameras are there, capturing what a day in the life is like for some of the biggest names in the NHL."

"NHL 36 is a great new series that is part of the high-quality storytelling and production values of NBC Sports," said Sam Flood, Executive Producer for NBC Sports and VERSUS. "It's an example of programming that dives deeper into the sport and its players, and one that viewers can expect to see more of from the new NBC Sports Network."

No word yet if the show will have any footage of a night out on the town with Kane or he and Jonathan Toews meeting girls in local cafes.

Right now the show is scheduled to feature 10 players. If it's a success, you can imagine there will be more after that. Who doesn't love these behind-the-scenes shows?

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: December 8, 2011 9:50 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 11:35 pm
 

Anisimov move sets off scrum; Downie leaves bench

By Brian Stubits

New York Rangers forward Artem Anisimov didn't make himself any friends on the Tampa Bay Lightning roster on Thursday night. Especially Steve Downie.

In the second period of their game in Madison Square Garden, there was a really interesting sequence that unfolded. While on the power play, a Lightning slap shot took down Brett Connolly in front of the Rangers crease, leading to a breakout the other direction. The rush was finished off by Artem Anisimov scoring a goal. The place was excited.

Then all hell broke loose. Relatively speaking, of course.

Obviously pleased with his effort and the go-ahead goal, Anisimov felt like celebrating. That's all fine and dandy, until he decided to pretend his stick is a gun and aim right for Mathieu Garon and the Lightning net. Vincent Lecavalier wasn't happy as you might expect.

The ensuing scrum resulted in four minutes of roughing for Marc-Andre Bergeron, two for roughing on Steven Stamkos, two minutes for roughing on Downie and a 10-minute misconduct, four minutes for Brandon Dubinsky on roughing, two minutes to Anisimov for unsportsmanlike conduct, four for roughing and a 10-minute misconduct. Phew!

"It was just classless," Stamkos said after the game. (Quotes courtesy of @AGrossRecord, @DaveLozo, @KatieStrangESPN, @NYDNRangers)

"It's wrong, we all know that," Rangers coach John Tortorella said. "It's the wrong thing to do. He's a solid, solid guy who made a mistake. He's not an idiot."

"I guess I'm in a protective mode because he deserves to be protected."

Tortorella went on to say that Anisimov apologized for his celebration and that he'll be available to the media on Friday. Nor did Tortorella blame his former team, the Lightning, for their reaction, admitting that Anisimov crossed a line.

"Artie's not doing it to do anything against their team," Brad Richards added. "Artie won't do that again. He wasn't trying to embarrass anybody."

That would have been the end of and the sportsmanship of Anisimov would have been the only remaining talking point for the next few days.

That's until you see the replay again and wonder, where did Downie come from to join that scrum? That's right, the bench. That means an automatic suspension is coming his way -- if it's determined it wasn't a line change. That could be the one thing that saves Downie if they decide he was coming onto the ice for the next shift after goal, but it sure doesn't look that way.

Eric Godard learned the suspension lesson last year with the Penguins. Making it worse, Downie doesn't have a pristine reputation. Brendan Shanahan might add more games on to what could be a long suspension.

In the end, it was the Lightning getting the last laugh, winning in a shootout after a late comeback to end their five-game losing streak.

But back to the original celebration. Are you OK with Anisimov going gunny on the Lightning?

More NHL Discipline News Here

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: December 8, 2011 8:11 pm
 

Mark Messier confirms he'll play in Alumni Game

By Brian Stubits

So far, almost all of the attention on the Winter Classic Alumni Game has centered on the Philadelphia Flyers. The Legion of Doom? Two of the three are playing at least. Just this week, former Flyers goalie Bernie Parent said that he'll be playing for the black and orange.

But what about the New York Rangers? Who is Mike Keenan going to be coaching?

Well the obvious became official on Thursday. The Rangers announced that their old captain and one of New York's more revered sports Stars, Mark Messier, will be playing for the Blueshirts on Dec. 31.

To see the full Rangers alumni roster as of this point, you can find it here.

We were all waiting for Messier to commit, but not with a lot of suspense. There was little doubt that Messier would eventually commit to playing. Now everybody wants to know if he'll commit to guaranteeing a win in the game like Rangers GM Glen Sather did about the one contest that will matter.

The Alumni Game is obviously just a show for the fans, nothing more than a little throwback fun. So it's great to see Messier confirming his spot. His presence is always welcome for Rangers fans.

Plus, he should be in excellent shape for the game. He just ran the New York Marathon at the beginning of November.

More Winter Classic News Here

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: December 8, 2011 4:08 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 6:37 pm
 

Looking deeper at concussions, fighting in hockey

By Brian Stubits

If your Facebook news feed is anything like mine, Dec. 7 was filled with loads of remembrances for Pearl Harbor Day, 70 years ago this year. Despite nobody I saw posting about never forgetting the day weren't even born, it was a worthwhile message nonetheless. Never forget the lessons and hardships of the past.

I would like to say the same about Derek Boogaard, the former Minnesota Wild and New York Rangers enforcer who died over the summer of an accidental overdose, a deadly mix of alcohol and Oxycodone. Don't forget his life and death -- same goes for Rick Rypien and Wade Belak.

In case you missed it, I strongly suggest you carve out a good chunk of time to check out the recent three-part story from the New York Times on Boogaard's life, an award-worthy story. It's incredibly well done. It's moving. I am not ashamed to admit that by the end of the story, I was on the verge of tears.

New York Times: Punched Out. Part I | Part II | Part III | Video

Of the many things to come out of the story, one was the revelation that Boogaard's brain, which had been donated to the Boston University study exploring Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), was showing shocking amounts of the condition already. To put it comparatively, Boogaard's 28-year-old brain had a worse CTE condition than the brain of Probert, who was 46 years old when he died.

Now I know what you're going saying: "Oh great, another anti-fighting story." Well, yes, for the most part this is. I have made my unpopular opinion on this topic made known in the past. But the latest information on Boogaard, the fact that his brain was severely damaged, it's worth revisiting.

Instead of just me standing on a soap box, I turned to Dr. Ricardo Komotar for some information on the discussion. Dr. Komotar is Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurological Surgery at the University of Miami School of Medicine. He graduated summa cum laude with a B.S. in neuroscience from Duke University, spending a year at Oxford University in England to focus on neuropharmacology. He received his medical degree from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine with highest honors and completed his internship and neurosurgical residency at Columbia University Medical Center/The Neurological Institute of New York, followed by a surgical neurooncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center to specialize in brain tumors.

So he knows a thing or two about the brain. I'm sure you can probably assume the answer, but what's his take on fighting in hockey?

"I think it should be 100 percent banned," Dr. Komotar said. "It's clearly unnecessary violence. Fighting is something you can obviously eliminate immediately. When you're talking about eliminating head blows in football, you're kind of limited on what you can do without completely changing the sport. Fighting in hockey seems like something that you could eliminate without changing the sport at all. You could make a big change, I think, without really altering the fundamentals of the game."

Which is true. The game itself wouldn't be effected. They still play ice hockey the same way in the Olympics and NCAA, do they not?

Dr. Komotar continued.

"Think about it. The only reason fighting is allowed is for entertainment purposes. It has nothing to do with the outcome of the game, it has nothing to do with the competitive nature of the game. They keep it because the people that go to hockey games want to see a fight. It's kind of sick. You're letting people do bare-knuckle boxing just so the crowd gets a tease out of it. It's something that has nothing to do with the game and only risks the players just so the crowd can get a thrill. It doesn't make sense to me.

"It shouldn't be something you're warned against. I mean the refs don't even break it up. That's crazy. The refs should just break it up. It shouldn't be endorsed.

"I mean to me it seems very straight forward, [removing fighting] is the clear, logical thing to do."

The hockey purists say fighting does play a role in the game. It's the old reasoning that the threat of violence actually prevents violence. Devils GM Lou Lamoriello put it this way.

"Fighting is part of our game," Lamoriello said. "It impedes more injuries to happen because of what potentially can happen with people taking liberties they shouldn't take."

I have heard this rationale for a long time and I just don't buy it. First of all, if Player A does something to injure Player B, a lot of times a fight ensues not between those players or even involving one of those players. Instead, it will be enforcer vs. enforcer. Where is the deterrent for a player that isn't answering for his own hit but letting somebody else do the dirty work?

But moreover, I believe there is actually evidence to show how backward this thinking is. This season, concussions in the NHL are down 33 percent, the league says. That's a very steep drop. And what is the difference between this season and past seasons? Why, Brendan Shanahan as the league disciplinarian, of course.

Under his short time in the role, he had made a concentrated effort to remove dangerous plays from the game. And if the stats are to be taken at face value, it seems to be working. It leads me to the conclusion that nobody can better prevent dangerous plays than the league office itself. Getting serious on fines and suspensions is doing a better job getting the dirty and dangerous hits out of the game than any enforcer ever did.

With all that said, getting rid of fighting won't happen any time soon. Commissioner Gary Bettman reiterated that point again to the Times, saying that there is no appetite for among the powers that be in the league to remove fighting from the game.

Here is the third of three video segments from the Times that deals more with Boogaard's brain study. The Bettman interview begins around the 9:30 mark.

But here's the crux of what inspired me to write about this topic again today. The state of Boogaard's brain was so deteriorated, it took the researchers at BU by surprise. Of the entire story, though, this is what perhaps caught my eye the most.

Last winter, a friend said, a neurologist asked Boogaard to estimate how many times his mind went dark and he needed a moment to regain his bearings after being hit on the head, probable signs of a concussion. Four? Five? Boogaard laughed. Try hundreds, he said.

Needless to say, things like that have caused the conversation about fighting in the sport to start up again. It's no wonder why Boogaard's brain was so deteriorated.

Here is something Bettman had to say at the Board of Governors meeting, and I quote the Associated Press. "He [Bettman] said he considers head trauma that comes from fighting different from injuries that come from hits because fighters are willing combatants and not taken by surprise."

"I use one word for that," Dr. Komotar said. "Ridiculous. Head trauma is head trauma. The origin of the head trauma doesn't matter. You get hit bare knuckle in the right spot, it can be a lot worse than if you get hit against the wall by a check, and vice versa. The reason for the head trauma and the situation for the head trauma has zero impact on its chronic effect. It's head trauma no matter how you slice it."

Bettman also said from the BOG meeting this week that there is not enough evidence to draw conclusions about the link between concussions and the CTE that has been found not only in Boogaard's brain, but the other three brains of former enforces that have been studied.

That is true. There is no direct causality and there might not ever be one.

"I think it's possible [to draw a causality line] because you're talking about ... everyone's brain is different," Dr. Komotar said. "Everyone's ability to have a concussion and recover is different, but I think what we've learned, especially in the last five or 10 years, is that it's not the force of one head injury. It's the repetition and the fact that you're not allowed to recover.

"Back in the day, people would have concussions and they wouldn't be allowed to recover the way they are nowadays. I think what is very clear is that repetitive concussions over a short period of time ... as those numbers go up, the risk of chronic brain damage increases. You'll never have a direct causality. Ten concussions equal this many years to your brain injury. Because every one's brain is different, and every concussion has a different amount of force. But what is known is that if you have three concussions in the course of three months, that's a lot worse than just one big concussion and then you're allowed a year to recover. Which is why the NFL and NHL have such strict concussion rules now."

It comes across to me as the league hiding behind a guise, ignoring the possibilities of the situation. What gets me is that since it can't be proven yet (maybe never), the NHL seems to want to go on with the status quo. It's akin to hearing that seat belts have a chance to save your life in the case of a car accident, but since you can die in a crash with your seat belt on, too, I'll just continue not to wear one.

It also reminds me of an argument that people make regarding religion. Some say they believe because if they are wrong, they won't know any better, but if the non-believer is wrong, then they will spend an eternity in Hell. Wouldn't you rather be safe than sorry? That's the same situation here, in my mind. Why not be proactive, be on the safe side? This really is a matter of people's lives.

It's not just about players dying, but the quality of their lives after playing. Nobody can know for sure, but if Boogaard were still alive, his quality of life wouldn't have been the same down the line.

"Tough to predict exactly [Boogaard's future condition], but the thought is that it [CTE] causes essentially an early Alzheimer’s and/or Parkinson's condition," Dr. Komotar said. "So something like Mohammed Ali. Overall, it's the death of neurons from chronic and repetitive head trauma, which leads to neuronal cell death. So all the brain cells start dying and the brain starts looking like someone who is 30 or 40 years older. You get an early dementia, an early Alzheimer's and an early Parkinson's. Again, is it 100 percent correlated? No. But that's the thought and it's been known to happen, as it did in Mohammed Ali."

That would likely have been the result for a player who grew up fighting, made his living as an enforcer. I'm not trying to say here that the number of concussions played an impact in Boogaard's death. Sadly, the use and abuse of prescription drugs is as big a concern as anything.

But the issue of repeated concussions is very concerning. We are learning all the time more about them and the damage they can do.

"What's interesting is that the old school of thought -- and I mean about only 10 years ago -- the thought was that you had to have a loss of consciousness to have a concussion," Dr. Komotar said. "What people are realizing now is that less than 15 percent of all concussions involve a loss of consciousness. So you're talking about the vast majority of concussions, the person never loses consciousness. So you're talking about 80 percent of the time back in the past, people were having concussions and not recognizing it, then going back into action. That's where you get the real damage. People are starting to recognize now that you don't need a loss of consciousness. They are holding players out. They have much more stringent rules in terms of re-entering the game and that allows the brain to recover and it reduces the chance of chronic injury."

Now I've been watching hockey my whole life. I've gone to games since I was a boy. I understand that fighting is as much a fabric of the game as the ice they skate on itself. It's a tough, physical game and hockey fans are proud of the game's history, which includes fighting. I get that. It's such a small minority of people that want to see fighting removed.

Nobody likes somebody who just points to a problem. People want solutions.

That's why I'm here not to propose a removal of fighting from the game, instead, I have a different idea. Would it be popular among the players and coaches? Of course not. I can't think of anything that would. But nevertheless, here's my idea.

When players fight, they are required to go to the quiet room, the dark and obviously quiet room where players are sent for 10 minutes when it's believed they might have sustained a concussion. Every time a player gets into a fight, they are evaluated through the concussion screening process and if they are found to have sustained a concussion, they be diagnosed as such.

Essentially I'm turning the penalty for a five-minute misconduct into a 10-minute misconduct. It's a stiffer penalty, for sure, but it allows for fighting to remain in the game and it could drastically reduce the amount of damage being done to these players. As Dr. Komotar pointed out, it's the increased number of concussions a person sustains in a short amount of time that is so damaging. The thought is that this idea would go a long way in helping to avoid that problem.

But I'm sure it will be fought all the way.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: December 8, 2011 2:02 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 7:27 pm
 

Martin St. Louis out after facial/nasal fractures

By: Adam Gretz

Few players in the NHL have been as durable as Tampa Bay Lightning forward Martin St. Louis over the past nine years, as he's missed just two games over that stretch. He hasn't missed a game of any kind for the Lightning since the 2005-06 season, and that streak, which was one game short of 500 consecutive games, is going to come to an end on Thursday night against the New York Rangers.

From Lightning beat writer Erik Erlendsson:

"No surprise but Marty St Louis is not playing tonight, a statement regarding his status is expected from the team shortly."

Here is said statement.

Tampa Bay Lightning right wing Martin St. Louis will not play tonight’s game at the New York Rangers and he is out indefinitely after suffering facial and nasal fractures at the team’s morning skate today at Madison Square Garden. St. Louis was struck in the face by a puck shot by a teammate during a practice drill.

St. Louis will return to Tampa Bay immediately and will undergo further medical examination by Lightning team physicians when swelling subsides in and around his left eye. A more detailed determination on his return to the lineup will be made at that time.

During the team's morning skate at Madison Square Garden on Thursday, St. Louis was struck near his left eye with a puck that resulted in a nasty cut and a lot of blood. He reportedly needed assistance getting to the team's bench and even stumbled on his way there.

Said head coach Guy Boucher, via Erlendsson, “We’ll see what the extent of it is, but right now it doesn’t look pretty. It just keeps on pouring. We have to prepare as if he’s not going to be available.” That was earlier Thursday. Good thing they prepared.

In 27 games this season St. Louis has scored nine goals and recorded 13 assists.

The Lightning enter Thursday's game riding a five-game losing streak and are coming off a 5-1 loss to the New York Islanders on Tuesday. If St. Louis can't go they're certainly going to miss his offense as they've scored more than two goals in a single game just two times over the past month.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: December 6, 2011 3:18 pm
 

Dion Phaneuf lights up Sauer, dad gets high-fives

By Brian Stubits

When it comes to hitting, there is nobody better in hockey right now than Dion Phaneuf. When the season is done and we're left trying to decide what was the hit of the year, there's a chance he will have authored each one of the candidates.

Like this one from earlier this season, for example. Or this one.

But will any be sweeter than the hit he put on Rangers forward Michael Sauer on Monday night in New York? Probably not.

Why not? Well besides Phaneuf hitting Sauer so hard that his stick AND helmet went flying, it was in the presence of his dad, as well as the rest of the Maple Leafs dads. It was a true illustration of why Phaneuf's last name has become a verb. He just Phaneufed Sauer.

And the dads approved.

That is Papa Phaneuf looking on with a strong appearance of approval and then getting high-fives from all of the other dads in the box at Madison Square Garden.

Why are the dads at a game in New York, you ask? They all got a taste to visit the team on a roadtrip, as a sort of a thank-you to their dads. On Sunday the team held a skate in Central Park with all of the dads in attendance.

We know one dad who really enjoyed the trip.

H/t to Deadspin

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com