Tag:Dominic Moore
Posted on: March 3, 2012 10:20 pm
Edited on: March 3, 2012 10:28 pm
 

Stamkos does it again for Lightning

LightningBy: Adam Gretz

The Southeast Division has officially gone from completely unpredictable to absolutely unbelieable, and is suddenly a four team free-for-all as we head into the stretch run of the regular season. The only team that appears to be out of it is the Hurricanes.

With their 4-3 overtime win in Carolina on Saturday night, combined with the Panthers 3-1 loss to Nashville, the Tampa Bay Lightning are now just two points out of a playoff spot, and only four points behind Florida for the top spot in the Division and what would be a top-three seed in the Eastern Conference. This is a team that was thought to be finished just two weeks ago, and had traded a number of players prior to the trade deadline, according Pavel Kubina, Steve Downie and Dominic Moore.

The Lightning have now won four in a row and seven of their past nine, and their schedule the rest of the way seems to work in their favor with 10 of their final 17 games at home -- including one stretch with seven in a row -- where they have a 20-9-2 record for the year.

They still have a game in hand on the Jets, the team they're chasing for the No. 8 spot, and they still have four games remaining with Winnipeg and Washington.

Steven Stamkos is doing most of the damage for the Lightning, and he added two more goals on Saturday night, including the game-winning goal in overtime as he continues his incredible goal-scoring pace, giving him 47 on the season.



You know, maybe 60 goals isn't out of the question for him this season.

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Posted on: February 18, 2012 7:25 pm
Edited on: February 18, 2012 11:10 pm
 

Pavel Kubina traded to Flyers

LightningFlyersBy: Adam Gretz

For the second time in less than a week the Philadelphia Flyers made a move to add to their blue line.

On Saturday evening, just a few hours after their 6-4 loss to Pittsburgh, the Flyers completed a trade with the Tampa Bay Lightning by acquiring defenseman Pavel Kubina. The Lightning will receive a second and fourth round pick, as well as forward John Kalinski.

The deal was reportedly held up because Kubina would have given the Flyers 51 contracts. The NHL limit is 50, which may have led to the inclusion of Kalinski, a forward that had been playing for Adirondack Phantoms in the American Hocke League, scoring nine goals to go with three assists in 40 games.

It's been expected for a few days now that Kubina would be moved, and the Lightning, having now established themselves as sellers, were holding him out of the lineup until a trade could be completed.

In 52 games this season the 34-year-old Kubina has scored three goals to go with eight assists and has logged nearly 20 minutes of ice-time per game. He will be eligible for unrestricted free agency following this season.
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Earlier in the week the Flyers made another move in an effort to solidify their defense, acquiring Nicklas Grossman from the Dallas Stars in exchange for two draft picks. Philadelphia has apparently been one of the busiest teams in the NHL as we approach the Feb. 27 deadline and have been the team most commonly referenced in Rick Nash trade rumors. Helping to fuel that fire was the word that Blue Jackets general manager Scott Howson and Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren were speaking to one another in Philadelphia on Saturday afternoon.

Given that the Flyers are currently the highest scoring team in the league and are once again struggling to keep pucks out of their own net, a very common problem in recent years, defense should seemingly be a much higher priority than adding another goal-scoring forward.

For the Lightning, it's also their second deal of the week as they also traded center Dominic Moore to the San Jose Sharks for a second-round pick.

After their 2-1 win over the Washington Capitals on Saturday night, the Lightning have a 26-26-6 record, which has them in the 11th spot in the Eastern Conference with 58 points, six points behind the Toronto Maple Leafs for what would be the eighth playoff spot.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.
Posted on: February 17, 2012 11:05 am
Edited on: February 17, 2012 11:13 am
 

Don't get too excited about that 2nd round pick

Shea Weber is the exception, not the rule for 2nd round success (Getty Images)
By: Adam Gretz

The most popular piece of currency that gets passed around (or is rumored to be passed around) the NHL this time of year is the second-round draft pick.

On Thursday alone we saw two deals go down involving such a pick when San Jose picked up Dominic Moore from the Lightning, and the Flyers acquired defenseman Nicklas Grossman from the Dallas Stars.

It's pretty much the going rate for a veteran rental that can provide some depth, and if your team is one of the ones that ends up coming out of the trade deadline season with such a pick, it's probably best to keep your expectations within reason. Because there is a pretty good chance that it will turn out to be nothing. Or next to nothing.

Just taking a random 10-year sampling of NHL drafts, there were over 340 players selected during the second-round between 1995 and 2005. Of those players, 122 of them never played a game in the NHL. Or, in other words, over 35 percent. That, of course, doesn't count the players that did appear in the NHL but never established themselves as regulars. There were another 122 players that made an appearance in the league but have played fewer than 100 games.

Add those two groups together and that's roughly 70 percent of the players that were selected in the round over a full decade. Not exactly great odds, especially when you consider that the picks exchanging hands in these situations are more often than not near the middle or back end of the round. Most of the impact players that were chosen during the stretch I selected here (guys like Shea Weber, James Neal, Patrice Bergeron, Derek Roy, just as a few examples) were picked within the first 15 picks of the round.

If you think your team is a contender, the thought of giving up a mid-to-late second-round pick shouldn't be much of a concern or stop you from making the move, which is probably why you see so many of them moved every February.

So why would the team on the other side be so willing to accept it? Well, that's simple. If you have a player like Moore that's set to become a free agent, and you know you're going to lose him in the summer, and you know your team is going nowhere for the remainder of that season, it's better to get an asset that gives you a chance (even if it's as low as 30 percent) of finding a future NHL player than losing an asset for absolutely nothing, which of course gives you a zero percent chance of finding a future player.

Also at Eye On Hockey

Moore traded to Sharks
Grossman traded to Flyers
NHL Trade tracker

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Posted on: February 16, 2012 7:39 pm
Edited on: February 16, 2012 8:47 pm
 

Lightning trade Dominic Moore to Sharks

LightningSharksBy: Adam Gretz

The Tampa Bay Lightning are not wasting anymore time when it comes to starting their pre-deadline trading.

After it was revealed earlier on Thursday that defenseman Pavel Kubina has been asked to submit a list of teams that he will accept a trade to, the team traded center Dominic Moore, as well as a seventh-round draft pick, to the San Jose Sharks in exchange for a second-round draft pick before the two teams faced off in Tampa Bay (Moore won't be playing against his former team).

The Lightning entered play on Thursday night in 13th place in the Eastern Confernence, 10 points out of the No. 8 seed and would need a miracle finish to have even an outside shot of qualifying for the playoffs. This move gives them, as of right now, three second-round selections in 2012.

Moore has four goals and 15 assists this season in 56 games for the Lightning, and will give the Sharks a reliable presence in the faceoff circle (he's winning over 55 percent of his draws this season) and penalty killer. The Sharks now have (as of Thursday's leaderboard) three of the top-15 faceoff percentage leaders in the league with Joe Pavelski (No.1), Joe Thornton (No. 12) and Moore (No. 14).

He will be an unrestricted free agent after this season, and will cost the Sharks about $303,000 against the salary cap over the remainder of the season.

Moore, 31, will be playing for his eighth team since the start of the 2006-07 season, having also spent time with the Lightning, Canadiens, Penguins, Sabres, Panthers, Wild and Maple Leafs. This is also the fourth time he's been traded near the trade deadline, usually moved for a second or third round pick. He also spent two years with the New York Rangers during the 2003-04 and 2005-06 seasons.

If nothing else, he's starting develop a collection of team issued luggage that might one day match Mike Sillinger's.

Also at Eye On Hockey

Kubina to sit while Lightning explore trades
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For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.
Posted on: February 16, 2012 3:50 pm
 

Lightning sitting Kubina while exploring trades

Kubina is being held out while the Bolts decide what to do. (Getty Images)

By Brian Stubits

It took Tampa Bay Lightning general manager Steve Yzerman some time, but he finally hopped off the fence and landed on the side of deadline seller. He held out as long as he could while his team heated up, but it didn't get the Lightning very far in the end.

So now is the time he'll start looking at his assets and moving them along to help restock the shelves in Tampa. What that means for now is that veteran defenseman Pavel Kubina is going to be shelved while the Bolts figure out what to do next.

"In the interim, we've decided to protect our interest and keep Pavel off the ice until this situation is resolved," Yzerman told the Tampa Tribune on Thursday.

Like seemingly half the players available in trade talks, Kubina does have a no-trade clause in his contract that expires after this season. In his case it's a limited one, but a hurdle for the Lightning nonetheless.

"We're making our decisions on a player-by-player and opportunity-by-opportunity basis," Yzerman said. "We see potential opportunity to improve our club with regards to Pavel.

"The broader strategy is we want to be a better team in the future. We want to be a Cup contender at some point, and we're going to have to do some things to become that."

At 34, Kubina is at that point where he's losing a step. Or so it would appear. His numbers are down across the board in recent seasons. This year he has three goals thus far with eight assists.

But he is reliable. Not counting his first season, only once has Kubina failed to play 68 games in a season. He still eats up just about 20 minutes of ice time per game, clocking in at 19:55 this season.

With teams always looking for defensemen, you'd figure Yzerman sees a chance to get a decent return here. A team like Chicago, who is known to be on the prowl for defensive help, could be one interested suitor. A veteran rental like Kubina can often pay off for squads, particularly at defense.

The speculation won't end with Kubina, though, that's just the start. It's probably a matter of time before Dominic Moore and maybe even Ryan Malone are mentioned more.

Ahhh, trade season.

More from Eye on Hockey

Updating NHL Trade Deadline rumor mill
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For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: February 13, 2012 8:10 pm
 

Shanahan further explains no suspension for Moore

By Brian Stubits

It's not often that Brendan Shanahan does videos when there was no suspension to talk about. I know a lot of people wish he'd do more on the non-suspension rulings, most notably the players.

But on rare occasions Shanny will feel a ruling needs the extra explanation. That's the case in the recent fine for Tampa Bay Lightning center Dominic Moore for his hit on the Rangers' Ruslan Fedotenko. You'll remember it left the Rangers pretty furious afterward. It really looked like it was a clear shoulder-on-head meeting.

It just looked that way.

When the NHL announced the suspension, it said there was additional evidence that supported the decision to only make it a fine.

We have our additional camera angle and further explanation from Shanahan that shows why the call was made and that it was the right one.

The first few camera angles you can't see anything but a shoulder to the head. It's on the later replays that you can clearly see Moore never hits Fedotenko in the head. Instead, he hits Fedotenko's hands which propels his stick into his own face.

Shanahan said the decision to fine Moore came from the fact that Fedotenko did sustain an injury from the hit and that it was still intentional interference.

It really would be nice to get more decisions explaining the decision on non-suspensions. This should be enough to cool down the Rangers fans who were riled up.

More from Eye on Hockey

Moore fined $2,500 for Fedotenko hit
Rangers angry with Moore hit

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Posted on: February 10, 2012 9:00 pm
Edited on: February 10, 2012 9:03 pm
 

Dominic Moore fined $2,500

By: Adam Gretz

The New York Rangers were upset about a hit that Dominic Moore put on Ruslan Fedotenko Thursday night, and there was some discussion as to whether or not it would result in any supplemental discipline from the league.

The NHL announced on Friday evening that it is going to hand out some additional punishment, fining the Lightning forward $2,500 for his hit that occurred early in the third period of the Rangers 4-3 overtime win. It's a decision that is probably going to fire up some debate and result in plenty of disagreement, not only because it came away from the play (Fedotenko didn't have the puck) but because it also appeared to be a clear hit to the head.

In case you missed it earlier, here is the play once again:



Moore was penalized on the play, receiving a two-minute minor for roughing while Fedotenko was pretty clearly shaken up as a result of the hit.

Previously at Eye On Hockey

Rangers upset with Moore Hit
More NHL Discipline News

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Posted on: February 10, 2012 10:15 am
Edited on: February 10, 2012 10:16 am
 

Rangers angry with Dominic Moore hit; suspension?

By Brian Stubits

It's been quiet -- almost too quiet -- on the Brendan Shanahan discipline front lately. Of course that's a good thing, everybody would prefer if Shanahan didn't have to do a thing at all in his job.

But it's time to wake the man up, he has some footage to review.

The Tampa Bay Lightning were visiting the Rangers on Thursday night, a game the Rangers won in overtime. It was early in the third period that Bolts forward Dominic Moore was given a two-minute roughing penalty. Doesn't sound like your run-of-the-mill penalty to sound the Shanahan alarm, but it wasn't exactly a roughing penalty. More like a hit to the head.

A blindside hit away from the puck where the principal point of contact sure looks to me like it was Ruslan Fedotenko's head? That's a recipe for a hearing at the least.

Moore told the Tampa Bay Times that he was "competing for body position" while "trying to make myself available for a shot. I guess [Fedotenko] wasn't ready for that."

Player agent Allen Walsh weighed in as he often does and called it a "textbook blindside hit." Not sure I'd put that one in the textbook, but OK.

The Rangers, meanwhile, we're just a tad upset (from Rangers Rants).

“There’s no puck there,” Brandon Prust said. “It looked like he was looking for him. There’s no puck and he got head contact. We’ll let the league decide on the rest.”

Brian Boyle was a little more emphatic about his view on the legality of the hit.

“Yeah, we’re still pretty angry about that. It’s a very dirty, dirty play. We’ve talked about it enough. We’ve got to get away from that stuff.”

Every time I have talked to players about these hits and Shanahan's job so far, I always get close to the same response: We have to respect each other out there. That's at the crux of what Boyle is saying and was made even clearer from Brad Richards.

“I’m pretty sure that’s what we’re trying not to do to each other,” Richards said. “If we want to keep doing it to each other, we’re going to have a problem. It’s idiotic.”

There is no word yet on Fedotenko's status after the hit but he didn't return in the game. Right or wrong (and I say wrong) that could carry an impact in any punishment for Moore. To be fair, Shanahan recently explained that he doesn't use that in helping to determine the verdict, just the sentencing.

When looking at Moore, he doesn't have a reputation that precedes him; he's not a bad apple. This strikes you as being out of character. And possibly even accidental. But I'm not a believer in punishing the intent; you have to punish the action.

But while Shanny has that game fired up, he might want to take a look at Victor Hedman's supposed slew foot on Prust too, another play that had the Rangers a little fired up after the game.

“I just wanted to get the puck and, all of a sudden, my legs went out from underneath me,” Prust said. “I don’t know what he did but it was pretty dangerous. I didn’t see the replay. I was in a grumpy mood today anyway, I just needed an excuse.”

Back to work, Shanny.

More NHL Discipline news

H/t to Kukla's Korner for the video

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
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