Tag:Francois Beauchemin
Posted on: January 26, 2012 11:38 am
Edited on: January 26, 2012 5:08 pm
 

What would all-Quebec team look like for Habs?

By Brian Stubits

Go back a few weeks when Randy Cunneyworth's "hiring" in Montreal was all the rage. Literally, rage. It led to organized protests against the Canadiens organization, not just Cunneyworth (although that was the impetus).

Those who didn't support Cunneyworth's hiring because he doesn't speak French were upset not only with the Cunneyworth promotion, but what they called the entire Anglicization of the Montreal Canadiens, Quebec's only team since the Nordiques became the Avalanche.

The list of complaints went beyond the coach not speaking French, however. Here is what the Canadian Press reported about the protests.

Protesters also complained the music played at the Bell Centre is in English, that announcements are in both languages and that the team has few francophone players.

I laughed when I first saw that. Would the people of Quebec rather have a team of Francophones that stink than a team of Anglophones that wins (of course they have neither right now)?

So that got me to thinking: What would an all French-speaking, Quebec-born team look like? I wanted to take a look and see how good of a team I could put together, keeping salary cap restraints in mind. (Hey folks, it's the All-Star break, just having some fun here.) Consider this my own All-Star fantasy draft.

Let's just get right to it, shall we?

Head coach

Alain Vigneault is the guy. The Quebec City native has actually tried coaching the Canadiens before, making the playoffs only once from 1997-2001. He was fired midseason in the 2000-01 campaign. But he's found success since moving on to Vancouver, winning the Jack Adams once and coming in as a finalist in 2011 (he was also a finalist in 2000 with the Habs). A return trip to Montreal will hopefully go better this time.

Goaltenders

Marc-Andre Fleury, Jean-Sebastien Giguere get the nod here. Now this is a position where I have a lot of choices. Fleury I think is a pretty clear starter based partly on his age, but for the second spot there are a lot of veterans: Giguere, Martin Brodeur, Jose Theodore, Martin Biron, Mathieu Garon and Jonathan Bernier. They can stop pucks in Quebec, that's pretty clear.

In terms of salary, Fleury takes up $5 million, Giguere only $1.25. So $6.25 million in goal is a decent price to pay, but not bad.

Robidas has spent time in Montreal already. (Getty Images)

Defensemen

I'm going with (in no particular pairing order) Kris Letang, Marc-Andre Bergeron, Francois Beauchemin, Marc-Edouard Vlasic, Stephane Robidas and Marc-Andre Gragnani. Letang leads the scoring punch while Bergeron, Beauchemin and to an extent Vlasic adding some more points. Defensively, Vlasic and Beauchemin highlight a pretty good two-way corps. But if anybody goes down, it gets thin after that.

As a whole, the defensemen don't cost that much. Beauchemin ($3.8 million), Letang ($3.5 million), Robidas ($3.3 million), Vlasic ($3.1 million), Bergeron ($1 million) and Gragnani (550,000) come in at a total of $15.25 million.

Center

Now this is a group of guys I like: Patrice Bergeron, Danny Briere, David Desharnais and Maxime Talbot. You'll notice one pretty big omission here and that's Vincent Lecavalier, but that $10 million per year is too big of a burden, I don't know how the Lightning do it. But I still have two guys who can score, arguably the best defensive center in the game, a young and promising player in Desharnais and a solid worker in Talbot.

Naturally this is costing me some cash here. Briere ($6.5 million) is costly, then add Bergeron ($5 million) before getting a little reprieve with Talbot ($1.75 million) and Desharnais ($850,000). In total, they take up $14.1 million.

Right wing

OK, I take it back about center. This is where my team is really loaded. Check out this lineup of Martin St. Louis, Jason Pominville, P.A. Parenteau and Alex Burrows. That's some serious scoring ability on the wing. I didn't have room for Maxim Lapierre or Pascal Dupuis at this position, but more on them later.

As you'd expect, this is the most expensive per-player corps on the team. St. Louis commands a cool $5.625 million, Pominville takes $5.3 million, Burrows costs $2 million and Parenteau a very reasonable $1.25 million. Total bill: $14.175 million.

Left wing

Here we have an Achilles' heel. The lineup we could toss out is Pierre-Marc Bouchard, Alex Tanguay, David Perron and Guillaume Latendresse, but that's an awfully risky group of players. Each of Bouchard, Perron and Latendresse have dealt with concussions while Tanguay has been suffering with a neck strain. So to add a little stability, I'm going to convert Dupuis to the left side and leave out Bouchard -- more expensive than Latendresse.

The good news is this group doesn't cost a whole lot. Tanguay ($3.5 million), Latendresse ($2.5 million), Perron ($2.15 million) and Dupuis ($1.5 million) run up a bill of $9.65 million.

Scratches

Since he didn't make the list at right wing, Lapierre is going to serve as our daily scratch. But really he's likely going to be playing a lot at left wing with the injury potential. What he also gives is a physical presence. He's at least not averse to dropping the gloves, having five fights this season for Vancouver. Maybe we could try and talk Georges Laraque to coming back and serving the enforcer role, but undoubtedly sitting in press row most nights.

Lapierre comes in at an even $1 million.

Overall

The total salary for this team checks in at $60.425 million, giving our GM (we'll just keep Pierre Gauthier) a little room to maneuver or sign maybe another defenseman that would likely sit in the press box most nights.

Moreover, the top prospect in the system would have to be Jonathan Huberdeau, the player who went third overall to Florida in the last NHL Draft. He's likely to be in the NHL next season and right now projects to be a center but he can also play on the wing, so he could help out with the weaker left side.

In the end, it's actually a much better team than I thought it could be. It might be a little lacking in the physical department, but the team has a lot of ingredients: It has some big-time scorers (seriously, a top two lines of Tanguay-Bergeron-St. Louis and Perron-Briere-Pominville isn't bad at all), it has some agitators (I'm looking at you, Burrows and Lapierre), is good defensively and I think it's solid in net.

And don't forget, everybody speaks French!

More from Eye on Hockey

Yes there were protesters in Montreal
Quebec group unhappy with Cunneyworth hire
Owner: Bilingual coach is important

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: January 20, 2012 5:08 pm
Edited on: January 20, 2012 5:25 pm
 

Ducks re-sign Beauchemin for three seasons

Beauchemin salutes his new three-year deal. (Getty Images)

By Brian Stubits

It wasn't long ago that Anaheim Ducks general manager Bob Murray declared that everybody on his roster save for Teemu Selanne and Saku Koivu could be had in trade conversation.

You can add defenseman Francois Beauchemin to that do not move list.

The Ducks announced they re-signed the 31-year-old defenseman to a three-year contract on Friday. The Ducks didn't release the salary numbers, but multiple outlets did, including Eric Stephen of the Orange County Register. The contract calls for $10.5 million spread evenly across the three seasons.

“Francois is a dedicated, versatile and hard-working defenseman who is committed to our organization,” Murray said. “We are extremely pleased to have him under contract for the next three years.”

Beauchemin came to Anaheim a little less than a year ago in a trade that is looking more and more lopsided by the day for the Ducks. Not to say that Beauchemin has been a bust in Anaheim -- clearly he hasn't if they are extending him -- but the return package of Joffrey Lupul and Jake Gardiner.

This season for the Ducks Beauchemin has six goals and 12 assists while carrying a plus-1 for a team that has struggled for virtually the entire season.

What's interesting is that this is Beauchemin's second stint in Anaheim and he left to Toronto via free agency. This time he was willing to ink a deal to remain with the Ducks.

It's all in all a pretty good contract for the Ducks, not a terrible cap hit to pay for Beauchemin. But more importantly it says a lot about the Ducks and what management thinks about them.

It gives you the impression that Murray is willing to chalk this one up to a fluky bad season and that the team's recent 6-0-1 record is indicative of how good they can be. Remember, most every saw them as a playoff team this season.

Still, it doesn't mean they are all out of the woods yet. Looking at the defense, Beauchemin might be under a new deal but Lubomir Visnovsky could still be available, if they can find any takers. He has seen his production take a major dive this year as he turned 35 while still under a $5.6 million per year contract through next season. Visnovsky has just 15 points this season after totalling 68 just last season.

Previously at Eye on Hockey

GM: All but Koivu, Selanne available
Remaining cap hits for Ducks in trades

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: January 9, 2012 9:52 pm
 

Ducks' Jacques gets three games; Beauchemin none

By Brian Stubits

Jean-Francois Jacques hasn't spent a lot of time with the Anaheim Ducks this season. WHen he has, he's caught the eye of Brendan Shanahan. Twice.

The Ducks forward was suspended for three games on Monday by Shanahan for his hit to the head of the Columbus Blue Jackets forward R.J. Umberger after the latter released a shot from the slot.

As usual, here's Shanahan's video explaining it.

This video has a lot of the same verbage we've heard from Shanny this season. Going into the slot, Umberger can expect a good check, but should not expect one to the head and in this case that was the principal point of contact.

"J.F. hit a player that was vulnerable after shooting the puck, and he needs to be more aware in those situations," Ducks GM Bob Murray said. "We accept the league's ruling and will move forward."

Leading to part of the three-game punishment is the fact that Jacques was handed a suspension in the preseason too.

That was just the first of two hearings on the day for Ducks players. The one a bit more concerning to Ducks fans was a hearing for defenseman Francois Beauchemin for his hit that left Jeff Carter with a separated shoulder.

Shanahan elected to come down with no additional punishment for Beauchemin, be it a suspension or a fine. That's the good news in it all for Anaheim.

More NHL Discipline News Here

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: January 7, 2012 3:07 pm
Edited on: January 7, 2012 3:10 pm
 

Remaining cap hits for Ducks players in trade

DucksBy: Adam Gretz

The Anaheim Ducks are struggling through a brutal season that's seen the team win just 11 of its first 39 games and, as of Saturday afternoon, get outscored by a larger margin than any other team in the league. Nothing is going right, and last week general manager Bob Murray made it known that just about every player on his roster not named Teemu Selanne or Saku Koivu is in play, which is definitely an intriguing start to the trading season.

Even though the team is lousy right now, and Selanne and Koivu are off the market, that still leaves quite a list of players that would be attractive to just about every other team in the league, including Ryan Getzlaf, Bobby Ryan and Corey Perry among others. Ryan's name was in trade rumors earlier this season, right around the team changed coaches, bringing in former Capitals coach Bruce Boudreau to replace Randy Carlyle, and nothing came of the rumors at that time. Who knows what's going to happen now that there's an "open for business" sign hanging on the front door.

For a team to complete a trade for one of Anaheim's many marketable players it's not only going to need an offer of players and draft picks that fits what the Ducks want and need, that team also needs enough salary cap space for the remainder of the season to make such a move, and a lot of these guys aren't cheap. When an in-season trade is made the team is responsible for a prorated portion of the players salary cap hit for that season, and it's determined by the number of days remaining in the season when the trade is completed.

To help figure out how much of a players cap hit a team is responsible for, the folks at CapGeek have a calculator that figures out the remaining value on each contract.

Below is a quick table for how much salary cap space a team would need to acquire one of Anaheim's top players this season on the following dates: January 7 (the present date), January 21, February 1, February 15 and the NHL's trade deadline, which falls on February 27 this season.

Does your team have the combination of players that can fill Anaheim's needs/wants as well as the available cap space?

Remaining Salary Cap Value: Anaheim Ducks, 2011-12 Season
Player 2011-12 Cap Value Jan. 7 Jan. 21 Feb. 1 Feb. 15 Feb. 27
Ryan Getzlaf $5.32 Million $2.61 Million $2.21 Million $1.89 Million $1.49 Million $1.15 Million
Corey Perry $5.32 Million $2.61 Million $2.21 Million $1.89 Million $1.49 Million $1.15 Million
Bobby Ryan $5.10 Million $2.50 Million $2.12 Million $1.81 Million $1.43 Million $1.10 Million
Lubomir Visnovsky $5.60 Million $2.75 Million $2.33 Million $1.99 Million $1.57 Million $1.21 Million
Jonas Hiller $4.50 Million $2.21 Million $1.87 Million $1.60 Million $1.26 Million $972,000
Francois Beauchemin $3.80 Million $1.86 Million $1.58 Million $1.35 Million $1.06 Million $821,000
Toni Lydman $3.00 Million $1.45 Million $1.24 Million $1.07 Million $843,243 $648,000

Getzlaf, Perry, Visnovsky, Beauchemin and Lydman are all signed through the end of next season. Hiller is signed through the 2013-14 season and Ryan is locked up through the 2014-15 season.

Photo: Getty Images


For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.
Posted on: December 13, 2011 12:54 pm
Edited on: December 13, 2011 5:19 pm
 

Lupul helping lift Leafs in early season run

By Brian Stubits

WASHINGTON -- When the Toronto Maple Leafs traded Francois Beauchemin to the Anaheim Ducks for Joffrey Lupul and Jake Gardiner, there was sort of a sense that the Leafs were getting the worse end of the deal. While it wouldn't be fair to call Lupul and Gardiner the equivalent of a bag of pucks and a zamboni, it didn't seem like the greatest return in the history of trades. Sure, the potential was there, but you never know.

Lupul 's time in Anaheim was anything but spectacular. After a couple of very solid seasons in Philadelphia, he wasn't finding the grass greener on the West Coast. Over a season and a half with the Ducks, Lupul played in only 49 games and had 15 goals with 12 assists. Injuries were as much a concern as anything.

As for Gardiner, well, he hadn't played a single minute in the NHL, so he was pretty much an unknown commodity.

But now, not even a year later, it's looking like one sweet deal for the Leafs and GM Brian Burke. That's because Lupul is scoring at a rate he never has before and has formed one dynamic duo alongside Phil Kessel, the sniper the Leafs have long been looking for.

As of this point, Lupul already has 33 points in just 29 games. That's good enough for the fourth-most points in the league, tied with Henrik Sedin and one ahead of Jonathan Toews. His 13 goals are almost halfway to his career high of 28, which he posted in his first go-round with the Ducks. More impressively, his 20 assists are just six behind his career high he set with the Flyers in 2007-08.

It's been partly a matter of fitting in, partly a matter of health. Despite having made two stops in his career in Anaheim, Lupul said that his comfort level playing with the Leafs this season is at an all-time high.

"Oh definitely. I feel probably the best I've ever felt," Lupul said. "Partially health wise and partially just because when you're getting results and things are going your way you get some confidence. Right now I feel like every game I can be a difference-maker whereas in the past sometimes your confidence is going back and forth. It's definitely a good situation for me, playing first-line minutes."

That's like the old idea some women try to use on men. Treat him the way you want him to act and watch him become that guy. Or something like that. The point is now that Lupul is getting first-line time, he's giving first-line production.

A lot of that has to do with the psyche, too. Confidence can go a long way for a player, not only confidence in himself, but also confidence from the coaches. It can be like a security blanket, a reassurance that allows a player to play looser. Lupul has that going on, too.

"When you make mistakes, which we've made lots of this year, it's good to know the coach trusts you and you're going to be back and you're going to be given a chance to make amends for it," Lupul said.

It becomes a chicken or the egg argument. Lupul is playing better because the coach trusts him while coach Ron Wilson trusts Lupul because he is playing better. Whichever came first, the result is one quality chicken.

Of course, we'd be remiss if we didn't mention more about the pairing with Kessel. Even including the NHL's superstar twin brothers of Daniel Sedin and Henrik Sedin, there has been no better two-person tandem this season than Lupul and Kessel.

We all knew what Kessel was capable of, but this season he is taking things to a higher level.

"Phil's taking the next step in his development as a player," Lupul said. "I think you can see that game in, game out he's better this year than he was last year. I mean last year he'd have the big games where he would be really dominant. Now it seems they are happening more often."

At 24, Kessel is really taking his game to new heights. With his league-best 18 goals, he's well on his way to smashing his career best of 36, which he set in 2008-09, his final season with the Bruins.

But Lupul knows they won't continue to enjoy this kind of success without more hard work.

"We realize things are going to get tougher on us as the season goes, especially on the road, matching up against other teams' best D and checkers," Lupul said. "That's a challenge we both have to be up to."

As for Gardiner, he is blossoming into a very good defenseman for a rather full corps in Toronto. The rookie has worked his way into the rotation in a big way, logging more than 20 minutes in a game on 16 occasions this season. The former first-round pick by the Ducks is finding his own niche in Toronto.

It's not like Francois Beauchemin has been bad for the Ducks. He hasn't. But this is sure looking like one hell of a deal for Burke.

Now if he could only figure out how to fix that atrocious penalty kill, they'd really be on to something in Toronto.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: November 3, 2011 3:52 pm
Edited on: November 3, 2011 3:56 pm
 

Shanahan on suspensions and non-suspensions

By: Adam Gretz

When Brendan Shanahan handed out nine suspensions during the preseason the biggest question on our minds was whether or not that torrid pace would continue in the regular season, or if that was simply the message sending and adjustment phase.

A month into the regular season and, as of Thursday morning, Shanahan has issued just four suspensions that have totaled 11 games, while also issuing just two fines. For a comparison, on the same date last season under former NHL disciplinary czar Colin Campbell, the NHL had issued seven suspensions during the regular season that totaled 17 games, along with six fines.

After four suspensions for an illegal hit to the head during a one-week stretch in the preseason, we didn't see our first suspension for a similar play until this week when Edmonton's Andy Sutton received a five-game banishment for his hit to the head of Colorado Avalanche rookie Gabriel Landeskog. Are the players getting the message that was sent out during the preseason and starting to figure out what they are and aren't allowed to do? Or has Shanahan simply softened on what's worthy of a suspension? I think it's a combination of the two, and according to players like Nashville's Mike Fisher, who was on the receiving end of a questionable hit this past week, there is still some confusion from the players perspective.

I do think, simply based on nothing other than my own observations, that we have probably seen a bit of decrease in the number of blatant hits to the head. Whether or not that's because of the run of suspensions during the preseason, combined with the steady stream of video's breaking down each punishment, as well as the videos sent to each team demonstrating legal and illegal hits, is certainly up for debate. There just doesn't seem to be quite as many questionable hits as there were in recent seasons that have left us asking, "is this guy going to get suspended?"

But while they don't seem to be as frequent, they do still exist. Over the past week, for example, there have been a couple that drew some attention that resulted in no punishment from the league, including a play that involved Fisher getting hit by Francois Beauchemin, as well as Rangers forward Wojtek Wolski and his hit on Senators forward Daniel Alfredsson.

Shanahan appeared on NHL Live on Wednesday afternoon and addressed them.

"The first thing players want to know is what can't I do," said Shanahan. "And then the next, maybe just as important question is what can I do. And so we worked really hard in the offseason, players wanted us to get rid of illegal head shots, general managers wanted us to get rid of illegal head shots and I think the fans do to. And I think it's going to trickle down into minor hockey as well, so we talked a lot about this and we worked with the NHLPA, and players contributed to this, we talked about making a full body check."

At that point Shanahan went into a full description of why there was no discipline for Beauchemin:
"We felt that Beauchemin worked hard, right here he's blowing snow, he actually gets in front of Fisher, and he's blowing snow and digging in and he's hitting him in the chest, shoulder and unfortunately there is some incidental contact to the head, but we feel that's a full body check. We've asked the players to do hat, Beauchemin worked really hard to get in front of Fisher, maybe a year ago he doesn't and he hits him from the blindside. Even though he approached from the blindside he didn't deliver the hit, you saw the snow blowing, he got in front of him, stopped, dug in, kept his elbow down, kept his feet on the ice and delivered a hard hit."
And then on the on the Wolski/Alfredsson hit:
"Wolski's not a dirty player, and has no history of being a dirty player. There are collisions that occur on the ice where, unfortunately, one player sees it just prior. On this play here, Wolski has got to get out to his point. You see here, Gaborik, the left winger, has to come all the way to Wolski's point on the right side because Wolski's not there. He ran into Alfredsson trying to get there."

"We've seen enough of these now, and I don't like these, but we've seen enough of them where when one player sees the hit just prior, he tenses up. And sometimes he even leans in because he's bracing for an impact. When both guys see it, it's two guys tensing up and they bounce off each other and everybody's fine. It's really unfortunate here, when one player doesn't see it and the other guy does."

"Now, if I felt this was intentional, or if it wasn't at the last instant, just prior. If I might have felt there was any kind of sneakiness or history of these types of offenses for Wolski, he would have been suspended."
Shanahan's emphasis on prior history, and whether or not a player has a reputation for being a dirty player or a track record of illegal hits has sparked some discussion as well as the concern that there is still way too much inconsistency when it comes to player discipline. Should it really matter if a player has or has not been guilty of an illegal hit in the past when he does eventually commit one? Of course not. An illegal play is an illegal play whether or not it's delivered by Wojtek Wolski, a player with no prior history, or Daniel Carcillo, a player with a lengthy history. Not suspending a player like Wolski because he's never done it before almost seems as if it's giving players one free pass before they get punished.

It's either legal or it's not.

Photo: Getty Images

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Posted on: October 30, 2011 8:01 pm
Edited on: October 30, 2011 8:03 pm
 

Wolski, Beauchemin won't face punishment for hits

By Brian Stubits

Wojtek Wolski and Francois Beauchemin? You are safe. Neither player will face further discipline for their hits on Daniel Alfredsson and Mike Fisher respectively over the weekend.

Wolski's hit in question came in Saturday's tilt with the Senators in New York. In the play, Wolski hits Alfredsson high on the play away from the puck and drew a minor penalty for the hit that left Alfredsson down on the ice.

Alfredsson missed Sunday night's game against the Maple Leafs because of the hit.

So what was the reasoning the league isn't acting further on the hit? Here's the explanation from Kevin Allen at USA Today: "The league view on the Wolski hit was that Wolski was bracing for impact when Alfredsson skated into him."

Plays like this one not getting more discipline will likely only confuse people as to what is and is not a bad hit. The line seemed to be coming into clarity, but this will only blur it once again. This seemed like a textbook suspension hit at first glance.

The Beauchemin hit on Fisher is much easier to see as not being worthy of discipline.

Here is the hit for your digestion.

Here is the reasoning from Allen in Beauchemin's case: "The league's view was that Beauchemin's hit was a full body check with incidental head contact."

Now this one I can agree with. It is a vicious-looking hit, especially with Beauchemin going airborne on the hit. However, the main contact definitely looks to be on the body, not the head.

For his two cents, Beauchemin said after the game he wasn't concerned about a suspension.

“I’m only concerned about his health," Beauchemin said. "I’m just hoping he’s OK because I think that was just a clean hit shoulder to shoulder. Looking at the replay myself, I think his head might have hit the ice when he fell down. And that’s probably how he got hurt.”

Like Alfredsson, Fisher is going to miss some time after taking the blow.

More NHL Discipline News Here

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Posted on: October 24, 2011 8:29 pm
Edited on: October 25, 2011 10:19 am
 

Pronger takes stick to face, out 2-3 weeks

By Brian Stubits

The first period of the Flyers and Maple Leafs tilt in Philadelphia on Monday night featured three high-sticking incidents, the most disturbing of them was the one Chris Pronger took. Coincidentally, it was the only one of the three that wasn't called a penalty.

Have a look.

Pronger scrambled to the bench and didn't return in the first period. Between periods, GM Paul Holmgren said Pronger would not return against Toronto. No more information about the injury was given from the team, but Tim Panaccio of CSN Philadelphia said Pronger remained in the arena and wasn't hospitalized.

The reaction from Pronger makes you shiver. On the video you can hear Pronger screaming as he lay on the ice and then rushed off as fast as he could.

TSN's Bob McKenzie later reported more. "He is seeing an eye specialist but because of swelling, more time will be required for an evaluation. No further details."

After the game, Holmgren addressed the situation further. Pronger will be bed-ridden for the next three days with swelling around his right eye.

“He’s got a little bit of an issue with his eye," Holmgren said. "Over the next three or four days, no real concern other than swelling or something behind the eye. He’s going to be on bed rest for the next three days.
 
“The hope is he’ll be fine in a few weeks here.  He will see the eye doctor for the next four days.”

Holmgren said it will be 10 days-2 weeks until Pronger is able to return to the team. That doesn't necessarily mean a return to the lineup, just to team activities.

"It's scary, obviously, to see him clutching his eye," teammate Scott Hartnell said in an interview after the second period. Yes, Scott, yes it is.

Earlier this season, Francois Beauchemin of the Anaheim Ducks had a similarly terrifying moment when he took a slap shot square to the face. Luckily for him, he was wearing a visor and he came out of the incident with just a few stitches above his eye from the cut. If he hadn't been wearing a visor, it would have -- not could have, but would have -- been much worse.

“To me, it’s not an issue, players should wear them,” Holmgren said. “Some of these guys have been around a long time and for whatever reason don’t want to wear them. When Chris comes back, he’ll be wearing a visor.”

This will only reopen the conversation on mandatory visors in hockey again.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com