Tag:John Carlson
Posted on: December 2, 2011 5:15 pm
 

Carlson likely to avoid punishment for elbow



By: Adam Gretz


Late in the third period of Pittsburgh's 2-1 victory over the Washington Capitals on Thursday night, Penguins forward Matt Cooke was on the receiving end of what appeared to be an elbow to the face from defenseman John Carlson, which you can see in the above video. It was a play that initially went under the radar during the game, and Penguins fans were not happy about it after the fact.

There was no penalty called on the play, and Cooke, it appears, was uninjured as a result of the hit. It also seems that Carlson will not recieve any supplemental discipline from the NHL.

Here's what the league said in a statement sent to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:
"The Department of Player Safety's view is that, with barely enough time for one last rush, Carlson was desperate to join that rush. He doesn't even see Cooke coming toward him until the last minute (his view of Cooke is obscured by Ovechkin until the last moment) and he actually cringes to avoid contact if you can pause it when they're a couple of feet apart.

"The worst-looking part of the play is when Carlson flares out his right arm. But he does that as he's past Cooke, in a "get out of my way, I have to get up ice" kind of way."
Of course, one can't help but wonder what the NHL's response would have been had the shoe been on the other foot and it were Cooke delivering a similar hit on Carlson, or any other player.

Penguins coach Dan Bylsma, however, insisted that Cooke's reputation did not influence the NHL's decision.

More NHL Discipline News Here

(H/T Pensblog for the video)

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: October 14, 2011 5:04 pm
Edited on: October 14, 2011 5:04 pm
 

Asham calls Ovechkin hypocrite, expects fireworks

By Brian Stubits

Nothing like a fight to get things riled up once again in the NHL.

Arron Asham's knockout of Jay Beagle in last night's Pittsburgh Penguins-Washington Capitals game has been the talk of the day, the soup de jour. The fight itself was noteworthy enough. After getting his right hand free, Asham threw two punches square to Beagle's face, dropping him to the ice a bloody mess.

Obviously what took it from there to a bigger story altogether were Asham's actions immediately after the fight. On his way to the penalty box, he motioned that it was over and then did a go-to-sleep sign. Very soon Asham realized the severity of the injury for Beagle and was seen tapping the glass in support. He was further apologetic after the game.

Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin, who was yelling at Asham from the penalty box while serving Beagle's two-minute minor, wasn't happy in the postgame.

“It’s a fight. It’s hockey game but again it was pretty tough. Beagle, like, he’s just first-year NHL,” Ovechkin said Thursday night. “Asham, I don’t know if he knows that or not, but just put him on the ice,” Ovechkin said. Beagle is “not a fighter, it’s not his job to fight. I don’t know, it looked kind of not respectful for players on different team. I don’t know what people think, but I think it’s not respectful.”

Well that got the attention of Asham. The Penguins tough guy, who reached outto the Caps' Mike Knuble to apologize to Beagle, wasn't willing to take that from the Ovie without a retort.

More Capitals-Penguins

“I don’t know what Ovie’s talking about, disrespectful,” Asham told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. “A guy who throws his stick down and warms his hands over it. He is being a hypocrite himself. The rivalry is back. I’m sure the next game is going to have a lot of fireworks.

"I woke up this morning feeling pretty stupid. Guys make mistakes. Mine could have been a lot worse than some of the mistakes that go on. I held him up at the end so he didn't smash his face up.

"I didn't know he was unconscious. I obviously want to win the fight but I don't want to hurt anyone. The thing is, I didn't go up and ask him to fight. I told him to settle down. He challenged me. He wanted to fight me."

I wasn't aware that the Penguins-Capitals rivalry had gone anywhere to the point that it's back, as Asham says, but this did solidify Dec. 1's rematch in Washington as must-see TV. After sitting out as a scratch the first three games of the season, it's probably safe to say D.J. King will be in the lineup for the Caps that day.

Meanwhile, Capitals defenseman John Carlson, only 21, took to Twitter to share some of his frustrations. After simply tweeting "#JayBeagle83", he was chirped back by a Penguins fan. Carlson's response? "Go screw yourself u mutant." Well, there's no doubting Twitter gets fans closer to athletes than every before.

Rivalries make the world go round. And in hockey, this has become one of the best and most intense out there. Now we just have some logs for the fire.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 23, 2011 1:41 pm
Edited on: September 26, 2011 2:09 pm
 

Southeast Division preview: Still chasing Caps

By Brian Stubits

The days of the South-least Division are slowly fading away.

For the last half decade, the Southeast Division has been the Washington Capitals' playground with four teams chasing. Of course the Caps have been very good through that time, but fattening up on their division "rivals" undoubtedly helped them to four straight division championships.

Just take the 2009-10 season as an example. That year the Capitals had 18 more points than the next closest team in the East while no other team in the division finished even in the top nine of the conference standings. That's especially amazing when you consider there are only 15 teams in the East.

They stil finished atop the East despite a transformation. Head coach Bruce Boudreau changed the way the team plays, trying to lock down on defense. As a result, the league's highest-scoring team the past few years dipped all the way to 19th in scoring. Alex Ovechkin had a very good season by almost anybody's standards. Just not his own.

The trick for Boudreau is to find that happy medium. They showed defense is something they can and in the past they showed they can score. Now they need to show they can do both. If they don't, especially early, Boudreau will hear the calls for his firing. The most successful regular-season team hasn't done enough after it to satisfy the increasingly antsy and demanding fan base.

But the somewhat surprising emergence of the Lightning last year has beefed up the division's rep. Tampa Bay figured to be on its way back up the NHL ladder, but the boom that came out of last season seemed to be ahead of schedule. Now the division has two of the game's elite scorers in Steven Stamkos and Ovechkin. With the Bolts unceremoniously sweeping the Caps in the playoffs last year, we just might have the beginning of an actual division rival for Washington.

The division also features something new: the most amped up fan base in the league, at least for one season. The Winnipeg Jets are still stuck playing in a division that will have them being true fish out of water. To say the Jets will suffer from jet-lag isn't just a fun pun but a reality they face. With that said, what was one of the easiest road trips in the NHL just became one of the toughest, especially for the teams in the Southeast that should look into taking the Concord to Manitoba.

Southeast Division (in order of predicted finish)

Washington Capitals: The Caps have become one of the league's elite teams and have done a pretty remarkable job of keeping their core together. Well this offseason owner Ted Leonsis and crew decided it was time to shake up the roster a touch to try and find the missing recipe to move Washington deeper into the playoffs. Enter Joel Ward, Troy Brouwer and Tomas Vokoun among others. I don't think there was a bigger offseason addition in this division than the Caps getting Vokoun, especially when you factor in the salary he'll be getting. Vokoun's talents have been hidden in Florida in the past four seasons, but he's an excellent goaltender but he is (or at least was) prone to prolonged slumps. As for Ward and Brouwer, they considerably beef up the Caps' toughness up front along the boards who are very capable two-way players.

Strengths: They have shown they can do every facet of the game well. It is a challenge to find a more talented team in hockey, including on the blue line. That's not something you could say in the past, but John Carlson and Karl Alzner complement each other well enough to make one of the best young defenseman duos in the NHL.

Weaknesses: It is tough to pinpoint any with this team, it is very well-rounded. It will be interesting to see how they handle expectations and increased heat when they hit some rough patches. Also, from an organizational standpoint the team has very little room to maneuver under the salary cap. That could be worth monitoring if/when GM George McPhee decided to tweak the roster.

Tampa Bay Lightning: Everything came together for a great run to a seven-game series in the Eastern Conference finals last season under new coach Guy Boucher. He brought in the ol' 1-3-1 system that seemed to be a magic trick for the Bolts. Now the question becomes can they repeat or was last year lightning in a bottle (that pun really was not intended)? One thing strongly in their favor is that the return almost the entire roster intact from last season. They did lose a couple of players such as Simon Gagne, but not much in the way of being unable to repair. one player who is back is Eric Brewer, and he'll be better for having spent camp and beginning the season in Tampa Bay. It will be interesting to see how this team fares with expectations on their shoulders.

Strengths: They roll out two excellent lines at the top. The Ryan Malone-Stamkos-Martin St. Louis line is one of the best in the game and the second group of Nate Thompson-Vincent Lecavalier-Teddy Purcell isn't too shabby, especially if Purcell continues his growth. They also had excellent special teams last year, ranking in the top 8 of both power play (it helps to have Stamkos, who scores 17 on the PP last year) and penalty kill a season ago. I also love the man on their bench as Boucher is a star in the making among coaches.

Weaknesses: I am still not in love with the goaltending situation. Dwayne Roloson was very good after being picked up by GM Steve Yzerman (he would qualify as another strength), but he just doesn't inspire a lot of confidence in me to keep it up. The addition of Mathieu Garon to back him up is a good one, though. Moreover, consistency might be an issue, especially for Stamkos. He really slowed down last season, failing to score 50 goals when he appeared to be on his way to 60 midseason.

Carolina Hurricanes: If the playoffs were a night club, the Hurricanes have been the guy standing at the front of the line until the bouncer says they're full. Every year it seems they are squarely on the playoff bubble, including last season when it came down to Game 82, which was a sound defeat. This season figures to be more of the same for the 'Canes as they might just be the next-best thing to a playoff team the East has to offer. They had a very pleasant surprise in Calder Trophy winner Jeff Skinner last season and captain Eric Staal is still leading the show. Gone, though, is another Carolina long-timer in Erik Cole (now in Montreal). One thing you have to love about this franchise, though, is its consistency. GM Jim Rutherford has been there ever since they became the Hurricanes (and before). It seems like their best players don't leave the organization, either. Hopefully for them the consistency in their finishes doesn't stay the same, but instead they crack the postseason. But in a beefed up East, that will be tougher said than done.

Strengths: They have an excellent captain in Staal, both from a leadership standpoint and player quality. They also boast one of the better goalies in the league in Cam Ward, an All-Star last season. And there's that whole consitency thing they have going on, often helps in the old chemistry department.

Weaknesses: There is not much depth to talk about in Carolina. After Stall, Skinner, Jussi Jokinen and Tuomo Ruutu, they aren't likely going to find a whole lot of scoring. They also don't posses a ton of size among the forwards, hence the reason they brought in Anthony Stewert and Alex Ponikarovsky this offseason to help. There just doesn't seem to be enough to crack the postseason, but Rutherford admits to this being somewhat of a "rebuilding" phase. That's a pretty competitive team for one that's rebuilding.

Florida Panthers: The Panthers were incredibly active in the free-agent market in July, adding a slew of veterans to hold the tide while the youngsters develop. Undoubtedly the Panthers are better than they were last season, but how much better? They did lose arguably their best player in Vokoun and are replacing him with the combination of Jose Theodore and Scott Clemmensen, not exactly an exciting development. But it can't be denied that the Panthers now at least have NHL-quality players across their lines (and defensive pairings, led by Brian Campbell and Ed Jovanovski), but they still aren't high-quality players, not guys that you figure can get them into the playoffs, finally. The trick in Florida is not doing anything now to hinder the future, which is very bright as the system is loaded.

Strengths: I do like the defensive corps they are putting together, especially if 2010 No. 3 overall draft pick Erik Gudbranson makes the team as expected. It's very hard to say at this point with so many new faces coming together what kind of strenghts we're looking at, it's tough to predict how they will play together. But we do know something that isn't likely be a strength this year ...

Weaknesses: The aforementioned goaltender position. With Vokoun gone, the Panthers are relying on the combination of Jose Theodore and Scott Clemmensen. Now, both do have experience, Theodore more so than the Clemmer, but in no way do they make up for what Vokoun, Florida's best player in recent seasons, took with him. You also have to wonder about chemistry issues with this team having brought in so many new faces. We'll put new coach Kevin Dineen as an "unknown."

Winnipeg Jets: The virtue of such a home-ice advantage will likely make the Jets a little better than the Thrashers were last season, but not enough. Thankfully for them the new home crowd in Winnipeg will just be jacked to have hockey back. They will need to take advantage of the home crowd, especially with a stretch of 10 home games in 11 contests that stretches from the end of November through December. But they will need to find scoring punch, especially from the forward group. They have excellent point producers among the defensemen in Dustin Byfuglien and Tobias Enstrom, but Ladd needs more help. Hopefully, that's where Evander Kane will fit in. In his third year since being drafted in the first round (all of his time spent at the NHL level) this could be the year he steps up his game and becomes a franchise fixture. He is already a popular figure partly by virtue of his Twitter account and the way he has taken to Winnipeg.

Strengths: They were above average on the power play last season, finishing 12th in the league thanks to Byfuglien and Enstrom. Thrown in the potential of Zach Bogosian as an offensive weapon and that's a lunch of firepower coming back the blue line. I like Ondrej Pavelec in net if he can get a little better support from his teammates. I will put one more in this category, and that's the patience of the front office. They have a lot of first-round talent on the roster and they don't seem willing to abandon the long-term plan for a quick fix to appease the riled up fans.

Weaknesses: The forwards need to show more. Outside of Ladd, nobody up front cracked the 20-goal barrier last season in Atlanta. They need to find a way to tighten down defensively after giving up the second-most goals per game in hockey last year at 3.20. The forwards doing a better job of creating scoring chances and possessing the puck will certainly contribute. The penalty kill was almost equally bad last year, clocking in at 27th in the NHL. Like the Panthers, we'll put new coach Claude Noel as an "unknown."

NHL season preview schedule
Wed., Sept. 21: Step-back players Tues., Sept. 27: Atlantic Division
Thur., Sept. 22: Breakout players Wed., Sept. 28: Central Division
Fri., Sept. 23: Southeast Division Thur. Sept. 29: Northeast Division
Mon., Sept. 26: Pacific Division Fri., Sept. 30: Northwest Division

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.



Posted on: September 22, 2011 4:16 pm
Edited on: September 26, 2011 5:48 pm
 

Breakout players: JVR ready to shine in Philly

Vanr1

By: Adam Gretz

There are plenty of new faces in the Philadelphia Flyers locker room this season, and they are going to have the difficult task of replacing the offensive production that belonged to several of last season's top-scorers that are no longer with the team, including Mike Richards (traded), Jeff Carter (traded) and Ville Leino (free agency). Players like Danny Briere and Claude Giroux are still there to help lead the charge, and big things are expected from 2007 No. 2 overall pick James van Riemsdyk.

The 22-year-old van Riemsdyk is entering his third season in the league and signed a brand new six-year, $26.5 million contract extension earlier this summer, coming off a 21-goal, 19-assist season for the Flyers in 2010-11. Solid numbers for a second-year pro, but it was during the playoffs where he really started to excel. Considering the expensive new deal he signed a couple of months ago, it's pretty obvious the Flyers expect him to continue his development and become a top player in a suddenly re-tooled Flyers lineup. And it's something he should be able to do.

Van Riemsdyk's breakout started during last year's playoffs when he played top-line minutes against Buffalo and Boston, typically against their best players, and finished tied for the team lead in playoff goals with seven. Along with the goals he was arguably the Flyers' best overall forward in the playoffs, making an impact every time he stepped on the ice, even with star players like Richards and Carter still on the roster.

That should continue to be the case in 2011.

He's going to be asked to take on a larger role for the Flyers this season, and as he showed in last year's playoffs, when the game becomes a little faster and goals a little harder to come by, he is more than capable of handling that assignment. Thirty-or-more goals shouldn't be out of the question.

Four more players, in no particular order, that could be on the verge of a breakout season…

OshieT.J. Oshie, Blues A former first-round pick by the Blues in 2005, Oshie has had his ups and downs in St. Louis, including a suspension last season following an unexcused absence. He's reportedly shown up to Blues camp in top shape and has apparently dedicated himself to becoming more of a pro. Talent has never been an issue for the 24-year-old Oshie, and now that he appears to be in great shape and committed to becoming a top player, a breakout season could be right around the corner.


SubbanP.K. Subban, Canadiens With Andrei Markov's status for the start of the season up in the air due to a setback in his recovery from a knee injury, as well as the departure of Roman Hamrlik and James Wisniewski, Subban could quickly become the top offensive option for the Canadiens along the blue line. And the flashy 22-year-old definitely has the tools to make a huge impact. He's kind of a polarizing player at this point in his career -- among both fans and players -- and seems to have that "love him or hate him" attraction, but there's no denying the ability and upside. As a rookie he scored 14 goals to go with 24 assists, which is impressive enough, but he's capable of doing even more damage to opponents.

WilsonColin Wilson, Predators There is perhaps no team in the NHL that relies on its farm system more than the Nashville Predators. This year's team has a couple of interesting youngsters including Nashville native Blake Geoffrion, who scored six goals in 20 gameas last year, and Craig Smith, a fourth-round pick in 2009 that had a sensational summer at the World Championships and the recent prospects tournament. There's also former first-round pick Colin Wilson who has a ton of talent but has yet to fully realize it at the NHL level. Entering the final year of his entry level contract, this could be the season the 21-year-old forward becomes the player the Predators anticipated when they selected him at the top of the 2008 draft.


CarlsonJohn Carlson, Capitals Like Subban, Carlson is coming off an excellent rookie season with the Capitals and has All-Star level potential. He already has experience playing top-pairing minutes -- he also saw time in every situation, including the power play and the penalty kill  as a rookie -- and is loaded with offensive ability. One of the top young defensemen in the NHL and figures to be a core player for one of the best teams in the NHL.

NHL season preview schedule
Wed., Sept. 21: Step-back players Tues., Sept. 27: Atlantic Division
Thur., Sept. 22: Breakout players Wed., Sept. 28: Central Division
Fri., Sept. 23: Southeast Division Thur. Sept. 29: Northeast Division
Mon., Sept. 26: Pacific Division Fri., Sept. 30: Northwest Division

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.


Posted on: September 9, 2011 10:12 am
Edited on: September 9, 2011 10:14 am
 

Daily Skate: Varlamov to attend Yaroslavl service

By Brian Stubits

UNFORTUNATE TRIP: Avalanche goalie Semyon Varlamov is a local hero in Yaroslavl, Russia. He is a product of the Lokomotiv team. Ironically enough, if the Avs didn't acquire him from the Capitals this offseason, he very well could have been on the Lokomotiv roster again this season. Naturally, the Russian tragedy has hit close to home for Varly and he'll be heading back for the memorial services. Adrian Dater at the Denver Post has more.

PTERODACTLY AIR: Much has been made of the flying conditions in Russia since the crash, and rightfully so. To get a further understanding, just read Coyotes assistant coach Dave King's take on Russian air service from his book King of Russia: "The charter craft have, for the most part, featured modern, up-to-date planes, but today we’re in a time warp, flying on a twin-propeller plane the players call Pterodactyl Air — for reasons that are self-explanatory." Here's the full section at the Edmonton Journal.

FIRST ACCOUNT: When the airline went down just after takeoff and landed in the water, there just happened to be a boat a few hundred yards away. Here's the harrowing account (Alex Ovetjkin) of their first response on the scene including their interactions with the crash's two survivors.

NEW ADDRESS, NEW NUMBER: After spending more than 11 seasons in Toronto to begin his career, Tomas Kaberle is now with his third team in a year, joining the Carolina Hurricanes in the offseason. And it's going to be a new start in more ways than one. With his number 15 already snagged by Tuomo Ruutu, Kaberle is going with the inverted look and will wear No. 51 (News Observer).

HOCKEY ON THE BOARDWALK: Despite not having an AHL team based in Atlantic City, the league will have its All-Star Game in the historic Boardwalk Hall (The Hockey News) next season. On a related note, next year's AHL All-Star Game will be one of the most attended and covered in the league's history.

NOT FINNISHED YET: Remember the name Jarkko Ruutu? The former Canucks, Penguins, Senators and most recently Ducks forward and brother of the aforementioned Tuomo Ruutu (two Ruutus in one post?) couldn't find a suitable offer in the NHL, so he's headed back to Europe, joining Jokerit of the Finnish league. Slava Malamud says Ruutu did have offers from the KHL worth more, but instead chose Finland.

THE NHL'S TIM TEBOW? That's the connection being drawn at PredGold between Predators defenseman Ryan Ellis and the former Florida Gators now Denver Broncos QB. Have a look at the list of similarities and see if you agree.

PERFECT PITCH: It's still the offseason, but camp is right around the corner so players are almost all on their way to the cities they play in, but still need a way to stay busy. John Carlson of the Capitals recently found something to do for a day, go to a Nationals game and throw out the first pitch. That's a nice arm on Carlson. Too bad nobody was in attendance to see it.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
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