Tag:Marty Turco
Posted on: March 7, 2012 11:58 am
Edited on: March 7, 2012 2:58 pm
 

Lightning G Garon out 3-4 weeks with torn groin

Garon is 23-16-3 with a 2.85 GAA, .901 save percentage. (Getty Images)

By Brian Stubits

The Tampa Bay Lightning announced on Wednesday that goaltender Mathieu Garon will miss the next 3-4 weeks after tearing a groin muscle in Tuesday's home loss to the Ottawa Senators.

Just when you thought the Lightning might have it in them to come roaring back (see what I did there?) this happens.

It's no secret the Lightning have been struggling with their goaltending this season. That would probably be an understatement, in fact. But Garon has given them a little more stability and good enough goaltending since taking over the reins from Dwayne Roloson. As a result -- and Steven Stamkos' 28 goals in the last 32 games, of course -- the Bolts re-entered the playoff conversation not only in the East but the Southeast Division.

That could all come to an end with this news.

The 42-year-old Roloson came to Tampa last season at the trade deadline and was a catalyst in the Lightning making it to the Eastern Conference finals. He hasn't been anywhere near as good this season. His vital stats? A 3.82 goals against average and .878 save percentage. I have one word for that: Yikes!

In relief of Garon on Tuesday, Roloson played 55 minutes and gave up five goals on 30 shots (the Senators had two more in the empty net).

As a result the Lightning have called up Dustin Tokarski from the AHL, who recently ran off eight consecutive wins for the Norfolk Admirals.

Now, why not put a claim in on Marty Turco before he can join the Bruins? Well it turns out that Turco wouldn't be able to play this season by a team that claims him since it's past the trade/acquisition deadline. So it's Boston or bust for Turco.

What the Lightning could do is sign a goalie from Europe like the Bruins did and then wait for him to clear waivers. The only question is if there's anybody they'd want.

Now I'm not going to say the Lightning are done with this news, I pretty much said that after they started selling at the trade deadline, but it certainly doesn't seem to help matters.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Posted on: March 6, 2012 10:46 pm
Edited on: March 6, 2012 11:00 pm
 

Milan Michalek's bizarre hat trick

SenatorsBy: Adam Gretz

Milan Michalek recorded his second career hat trick on Tuesday night during the Senators 7-3 win in Tampa Bay, and it was pretty much a gift from Lightning coach Guy Boucher.

All three goals were scored in succession during the third period, making it a natural hat trick, and it was also one of the more, let's say ... interesting, hat tricks that you will see, scoring his first goal on the power play, giving the Senators a 5-3 lead, and then completing the trick by adding not one, but two empty net goals as Tampa Bay coach Guy Boucher kept pulling his goalie in a desperate attempt to get his team back into the game.



You don't always see coaches pulling their goalie with a minute to play in a game their team is down by three goals, as the Lightning were when Boucher lifted Dwayne Roloson allowing Michalek to score his third goal, but Tampa Bay is in desperate need of points as it attempts to stay in the Eastern Conference playoff race (and, amazingly, the Southeast Division race) and it was a last ditch effort to spark a late rally.

And let's face it, whether they lose by three goals or 20 goals it's still two points they didn't get in the end.

The night really seemed to go off the rails for Tampa Bay in the first period when starting goalie Mathieu Garon had to leave the game due to injury. Roloson came in and almost instantly surrendered three straight goals, putting the Lightning in a hole they were never able to climb out of.

Given the overall mediocrity of the Southeast Division (and the bottom of the Eastern Conference playoff race) which has the Lightning still very much in the race, combined with their less than stellar goaltending situation, it probably wouldn't be a bad idea for the Lightning to put a waiver claim in on Marty Turco.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter and like us on Facebook.
Posted on: March 5, 2012 8:07 pm
Edited on: March 5, 2012 8:21 pm
 

Bruins sign Marty Turco after Rask injury

Turco spent 2010-11 in Chicago. (Getty Images)

By Brian Stubits

Not even an hour after the Boston Bruins announced that backup goaltender Tuukka Rask was going to miss the next 4-6 weeks with an abdomen strain/groin strain, they found their new (and temporary) backup by signing veteran Marty Turco.

Turco, who most recently played in the NHL with the Blackhawks last season, has spent time this year playing in Austria's First Division. In six postseason starts, he had a 3.16 GAA and .911 save percentage.

Pierre LeBrun of ESPN.com reports that it won't cost the Bruins much, the deal is just for one year and will cost $600,000, pro rated of course.

Before we get too far, it's important to note that Turco has to clear waivers before anything else. Remember last year the Red Wings signed Evgeni Nabokov from Russia but the Islanders claimed him and he never made it to Detroit.

So that's the big question here. Will any team claim Turco and now allow him to join the Bruins? Just throwing it out there but what about the Tampa Bay Lightning? Dwayne Roloson has been usurped by Mathieu Garon and hardly plays any more. They are right in the thick of things in the East again. I could also see an argument for the Senators making a claim seeing as how they are chasing the Bruins in the Northeast right now and Alex Auld hasn't inspired a lot of confidence either.

Further, even if he does make it through waivers and ends up with the Bruins, he won't be eligible to play in the playoffs. The waiver deadline for playoff additions was last week.

Last season with the Blackhawks Turco was 11-11-3 with a 3.02 goals against average and save percentage of .897. He didn't have any offers from the NHL at the time so headed to Europe.

Turco was in Boston last year for the Stanley Cup Final, as an analyst on the NHL Network's coverage.

More from Eye on Hockey

Bruins annouce Rask out 4-6 weeks

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Posted on: November 10, 2011 3:10 pm
Edited on: November 10, 2011 3:23 pm
 

Reimer's mom concerned about son's health

Remimer1By Brian Stubits

One thing is becoming increasingly clear with each passing game in Toronto: the Maple Leafs miss James Reimer in net. What's becoming increasly unclear is when he will return and what he's even suffering from.

You know it's bad when his own mom isn't sure what exactly is going on. How do we know? Dave Feschuk of the Toronto Star asked her.

“We’re beginning to be a little more concerned than we were at first,” Reimer's mother told Feschuk. “At first, when (the Maple Leafs) said it was just going to be a day-to-day whiplash kind of thing, you just wait it out. But definitely our concerns are getting a little stronger as time that passes. We’re definitely hoping there are going to be some answers coming out of the team shortly, what they’re doing or what they’re planning to do.”

And more...

“That’s the frustrating part for us -- not knowing what it is, and why they’re not calling it a concussion when they say ‘concussion-like symptoms,’” Marlene Reimer said. “Like, how is that not a concussion? ... The initial test showed him to be clear of a concussion. But as it goes on, it’s kind of mystifying. He’s okay some days. And some days he’s definitely not okay.”

Read the full story for more.

Meanwhile, back at the ranch (or Toronto), Leafs coach Ron Wilson shared his displeasure with a member of the media calling Reimer's mom. But with how quiet they have been about the injury, the hungry Toronto media would find a way to get some answers.

On the ice, the fans are growing more and more anxious about Reimer's return. That's because Jonas Gustavsson has been ... not very good. He was booed mercilessly before being pulled in Toronto's 5-1 loss to Florida on Tuesday. There has been a lot of discussion about the Leafs trying to get a third goalie on the roster.

The belief is that GM Brian Burke, especially if Reimer continues to sit out, will look for another goalie. Either way, Reimer playing or not, it would be wise for Toronto to get a quality backup. Gustavsson has about worn out his welcome and Ben Scrivens hasn't inspired a lot of confidence either.

Among the names you are most likely to hear for possibilities in that backup spot are Marty Turco and the one I will continue to mention, Scott Clemmensen in Florida.

In the meantime, Mama Reimer will continue to wonder how exactly her son is doing.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 6, 2011 7:41 pm
Edited on: September 6, 2011 7:41 pm
 

Marty Turco not ready to retire



By: Adam Gretz

Training camps are set to begin next week and Marty Turco is still without a team. I wrote about Turco's situation, as well as a few other veteran goaltenders that were still looking for work, back in July and wondered where (or if) players like him could still fit in, seeing as how nearly every team in the league appeared to be set in the crease.

Now that we're into September, not much has changed, and Turco is still searching for a club.

To this point we haven't really heard much about Turco's plans, whether he intends to keep playing or if he will simply call it a career and announce his retirement. That changed on Tuesday when he spoke to Jesse Rogers of ESPN Chicago and confirmed that he still wants to, and thinks he still can, play in the NHL this season, and isn't quite ready to move into the broadcasting booth or any other post-hockey endeavor.

From Rogers:
Turco's hopes probably reside on a training camp injury or underwhelming performance either by a rookie or other veteran. "I want to play some more," Turco said. "I still think I can play in this league. I'm not ready for plans after hockey just yet."
And that's probably what it's going to take -- an injury or underwhelming performance by a goaltender that's considered a question mark headed into the season. Every team in the NHL has at least two goaltenders signed to an NHL contract for the upcoming season, and in recent weeks veterans like Ray Emery (Chicago) and Manny Legace (Vancouver) have accepted tryout contracts with no guarantees, and in the case of Legace, a seemingly slim chance of sticking with the NHL club.

Turco signed with the Chicago Blackhawks late last summer after the club walked away from Antti Niemi's arbitration ruling. He opened the season as the starter, struggled, and appeared in just 29 games, the second lowest number of his career (the lowest was his rookie season as a member of the Dallas Stars). By the middle of the season rookie Corey Crawford had taken over as the No. 1 goalie with the Blackhawks and not only held that spot through the playoffs, but also managed to get a three-year contract extension as a result of his promising play.

The one team that might stand out as a possible destination for Turco -- and this is nothing more than a guess at this point -- is the Columbus Blue Jackets. Steve Mason is entering his fourth season in the NHL and has regressed a bit from his standout rookie season, while the only player behind him on the NHL roster is 25-year-old Mark Dekanich, a minor league standout in the Nashville Predators organization that has appeared in just one NHL game. If things go poorly with that situation a player like Turco might be an option as a stop-gap.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.


Posted on: August 9, 2011 9:43 pm
Edited on: August 10, 2011 1:40 pm
 

A look at what's being tested at RDO Camp

rdoBy: Adam Gretz

The NHL will be holding its Research, Development and Orientation camp in Ontario next week, an event that helps the league test potential rule changes. They will be using 30 prospects, as well as head coaches Dan Bylsma (Pittsburgh) and Dave Tippett (Phoenix) to test the potential changes, ranging from no-touch icing, hybrid icing and no line changes for a team guilty of being offside, among many, many others.

Dan Rosen at NHL.com has a complete rundown of everything that will be tested (and there's a ton of stuff going on), as well as a schedule for each day.

A couple of the proposals that will be tested that stand out to me:

1) REMOVAL OF THE TRAPEZOID Yes. A thousand times yes. Implemented after the lockout as part of the effort to increase goal scoring across the league, it put a restriction on goaltenders leaving their crease and going into the corners to play the puck, limiting players that had spent years improving their puckhandling ability (guys like Martin Brodeur, Marty Turco, etc.). When I spoke with Phoenix's Mike Smith a couple of weeks ago, a goaltender that's regarded to be a strong puckhandler, we talked about this briefly and you can probably count him as somebody else that's probaby in favor of giving goaltenders more freedom. Limiting the movement of players on the ice (which this rule does) just seems to go against what the game is all about. And if your goaltender can't handle the puck effectively, well, he either needs to improve that aspect of his game or your team needs to find a goaltender that's capable of doing it.

2) NO ICING PERMITTED WHILE SHORTHANDED Now here's a way to potentially increase scoring, at least as far as the power play is concerned. By calling icing in shorthanded situations (you're currently allowed to ice the puck while on the penalty kill, which is the only advantage the shorthanded team has) you're going to increase the number of offensive zone faceoffs for teams on the power play, which is bad news for teams that are down a man. The dangers of defensive zone faceoffs are obvious -- the closer a team starts to the net it's trying to score on, the better chance it has of getting a shot on goal and scoring if it can win the faceoff (you can read more about the dangers of Defensive Zone Faceoffs by clicking here). And this is true in even-strength situations, let alone power play/penalty kill situations. Not a huge fan of this one as it gives teams on the power play yet another sizable advantange. Playing a man up (or two) is enough. A couple of years the NHL made it so every power play starts in the offensive zone, regardless of where the offending team gained control the puck to draw the whistle on a delayed penalty call.

3) OVERTIME VARIATIONS The current tiebreaking procedure in the NHL consists of five minutes of four-on-four sudden death overtime, followed by a shootout if the tie is not broken. The shootout has been a polarizing addition to the league, and last year the NHL took a small step toward reducing its impact by not including shootout wins as part of the tiebreaking procedure in the standings.

Another way to help reduce its impact (and the number of shootouts) is to give teams more overtime to play with, including several minutes with fewer players on the ice.

One idea that will be tested will be to switch ends, play four minutes of four-on-four hockey and then, if the tie is still not broken, switch ends again and play three minutes of three-on-three hockey. After seven minutes of four-on-four and three-on-three hockey it stands to reason that, given the amount of talent that will be on the ice and the additional room that will be out there, somebody will manage to get a goal and break the tie before a shootout is required. I like this idea quite a bit and would like to see it get some serious consideration, if for no other reason than the potential to see some of the three-on-three lineups teams like Pittsburgh, Detroit, Washington, Vancouver or Chicago could throw out there, and the type of back-and-forth hockey that would follow.

Just because these are being tested doesn't mean the rules will be changed or added to the league, it's simply a way to see them in action and take a test drive.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: July 27, 2011 7:46 pm
Edited on: July 27, 2011 8:07 pm
 

Ray Emery gets tryout with Blackhawks

Emery

By: Adam Gretz

Last week looked at the handful of veteran goaltenders still looking for work around the NHL, and how few options they had. One of those players was journeyman Ray Emery, who spent last season with the Anaheim Ducks. According to ESPN's Scott Burnside, Emery will take part in the Chicago Blackhawks training camp on a tryout basis, presumably in an effort to compete for the backup job (along with Alexander Salak) behind second-year starter Corey Crawford.

As I said last week, I think Emery has a shot to be the most productive of the goaltenders still remaining (the others are Marty Turco and Pascal Leclaire) and getting him on a tryout basis is the definition of a low-risk, high-reward move for the Blackhawks.

Worst case scenario for Chicago is Emery gives the 24-year-old Salak some healthy competition, while the possibility remains that he could steal the show and give the Blackhawks a solid veteran backup that's been a productive NHL goaltender at various times throughout his career.

The 28-year-old Emery appeared in 10 regular season games with the Ducks last season, and appeared in all six of their playoff games against the Nashville Predators.

Crawford signed a three-year contract with the Blackhawks earlier this summer worth $2.6 million per season. He wrestled the starting job away from Turco after the veteran was brought in to help replace Antti Niemi, who the Blackhawks walked away from due to last summer's salary cap crunch. The 26-year-old recored a .917 save percentage during the regular season and impressed in his first playoff appearance (.927 save percentage), even though the Blackhawks fell to the Vancouver Canucks in the opening round

Salak, 24, has appeared in just two NHL games in his career (both of which came with the Florida Panthers during the 2009-10 season), and spent last season in Sweden.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnhl and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: July 22, 2011 1:03 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:39 pm
 

Free-agent goalies running out of options

Goalies

By Adam Gretz

It's a bad time of year to be a goaltender still sitting on the free-agent market. A position that had limited opportunities at the start of the offseason (as we discussed with Phoenix's Mike Smith on Thursday) is now even thinner when it comes to potential job openings, especially after Detroit's signing of Ty Conklin on Wednesday and the Sabres' re-signing of Jhonas Enroth on Thursday.

With those two players signed, every team in the NHL now has at least two goalies under contract for the 2011-12 season, and as James Mirtle of the Globe and Mail pointed out, many of them are on one-way deals that all but settles the goaltending spots around the league.  Even though all of the spots have have been filled, there are still some players that could help a team looking for work.

The three biggest names still available: Marty Turco, Pascal Leclaire and Ray Emery. Unless somebody is willing to take a minor-league deal, or perhaps look overseas, it could be a lengthy wait for a spot to open up this season.

Here's a quick look at the three top goalies still available.

Marty Turco: This is nothing more than a guess at this point, but could Turco be the next goalie to call it a career? At the age 35, he's coming off what was statistically the worst season of his 10-year NHL career, and simply isn't the player he once was during his days in Dallas when he was one of the better goaltenders in the league. He spent last season with the Blackhawks where he ended up backing up rookie Corey Crawford for much of the regular season and all of the playoffs. It's true he remained unsigned until early August last offseason, but it's unlikely another job will open up the same way Chicago's did when it walked away from Antti Niemi's arbitration ruling.

Pascal Leclaire: A top-10 pick by the Blue Jackets back in 2001, Leclaire showed flashes of potential early in his career with Columbus, including the 2007-08 season where he won 24 games and recorded six shutouts, but he has struggled in the years since. He was relegated to backup duty with the Jackets in 2008 because of the emergence of Steve Mason before eventually being traded to Ottawa, where he also served as a backup the past two seasons. Injuries, as well as inconsistent play on the ice, have also helped to derail his development. He's still only 28 years old.

Ray Emery: Of the goalies still available, Emery is the one that can probably offer the most help to a team this season, assuming there was one that still needed a goalie at this point. He's bounced around between Ottawa, Philadelphia and Anaheim throughout his seven-year career, as well as making a brief stop in Russia during the 2008-09 season. He ended up being nominated for the Masterson Trophy last season after helping lead the Ducks into the postseason and started all six of their playoff games. He's around the same age as Leclaire but has had more success in recent years, including in the postseason where he started for the Senators team that made it to the Stanley Cup Finals in 2006, as well as last year's appearance with Anaheim.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnhl and @agretz on Twitter.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com