Tag:Nick Foligno
Posted on: December 22, 2011 9:25 pm
Edited on: December 22, 2011 9:27 pm
 

Nick Foligno ejected; Should he have been?

By: Adam Gretz

Senators forward Nick Foligno was ejected early in the second period of his team's game against the Florida Panthers on Thursday night for charging Keaton Ellerby.



Is that a good call? I think it's tough, and at first glance that appears to be more of a nasty collision than a dirty hit, especially when you watch the second and third angles in slow motion.

Foligno has found himself in the middle of a few controverial plays this season, most of which he was on the receivin end of, including the elbow from Sidney Crosby that sparked a near month-long debate, as well as a recent knee-on-knee hit from Boston's Adam McQuaid.

In a game against Vancouver earlier this month he delivered a pair of huge hits, one of which resulted in a boarding call and a game misconduct.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: December 15, 2011 3:48 pm
Edited on: December 15, 2011 5:48 pm
 

Bruins' McQuaid avoids suspension for kneeing

By Brian Stubits

Adam McQuaid of the Boston Bruins was given a five-minute major and game misconduct in the Bruins' win in Ottawa on Wednesday for kneeing Nick Foligno.

Immediately people wondered what sort of additional punishment McQuaid Would face for the hit. It had to be coming from Brendan Shanahan, right? The hit sure looked pretty similar to Kevin Porter's kneeing of David Booth, which earned Porter a four-game suspension.

Well McQuaid won't be suspended, but it was announced by the NHL on Thursday that he has been fined $2,500.

After the game, McQuaid wanted it known that it wasn't intentional and he's a clean player (from CSN New England).

“If I could take it back, I definitely would,” said McQuaid, who blocked a pair of shots and registered three hits in. “It was one of those things where you go, ‘Oh, crap’, right after it happened.

"The penalty was deserved. That’s not me at all. I think that’s actually my first major penalty in my career outside of the fighting calls, and I don’t plan on getting any more.”

Foligno, who wasn't badly injured from the hit and did return to the game, stood up for McQuaid after the game. The two have a history with each other stretching back to their days in juniors.

"He was just trying to slow down my progress. It was a hockey play and I don't think there was any attempt to injure," Foligno said. "I've known Quaider a long time and I know he's not that type of player."

I must say, I'm surprised at the ruling. Even with a contrite McQuaid and an uninjured Foligno, I thought this would warrant something from Shanahan. I didn't expect it to be as tough as the suspension Porter received, but I thought it would be at least one game for McQuaid. It was a bad play.

I find judging the intent of the players to be a very tough and horribly mitigating factor. While I would tend to agree that McQuaid didn't intend to injure Foligno, I also don't think most all of the bad hits that are delivered are done with the intent to injure. Most of the players I have spoken to about this all talk about respect they have for their fellow players and they never want to see a guy go down injured.

People are punished all the time for the results of their actions and not their intent. When a person who has too much to drink gets behind the wheel and causes an accident, they will face the consequences of driving drunk even though their intention was likely just to get to where they were going.

I'll turn it over to you. Was this the right call or not?

More NHL Discipline News Here

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: December 14, 2011 9:44 pm
Edited on: December 14, 2011 9:52 pm
 

Adam McQuaid ejected for kneeing Nick Foligno

By: Adam Gretz

Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid was ejected late in the second period of their game in Ottawa on Wednesday night for kneeing Senators forward Nick Foligno with less than five minutes to play in the period. Along with the game misconduct he was also issued a five-minute major for kneeing, and always, there's a good chance it's going to get additional review from the NHL.

Foligno was able to return to the game.



Just last week the NHL issued a four-game suspension to Colorado's Kevin Porter for his knee-on-knee hit against Vancouver's David Booth. Booth is expected to miss four-to-six weeks with a sprained MCL. Prior to that incident Edmonton's Ryan Whitney avoided any discipline for his knee-on-knee collision with Minnesota's Cal Clutterbuck.

What do you say, hockey fans? Is the major and a game misconduct enough of a punishment, or does McQuaid sit for a couple of games?

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: November 26, 2011 10:37 pm
Edited on: November 27, 2011 11:38 am
 

Pacioretty, Letang and controversy in Montreal

By: Adam Gretz

How do you know when a game has questionable (or, let's be honest about it, bad) officiating? When both teams have a legitimate gripe that they were robbed, which is kind of what unfolded in Montreal on Saturday night.

Late in the third period of Pittsburgh's 4-3 overtime win over the Canadiens, and just minutes after Jordan Staal tied the game, scoring on a breakaway off the bench, Montreal's Max Pacioretty hit Kris Letang coming across the middle of the ice with what appeared to be an elbow to the face, resulting in a pool of blood on the ice.

There was no penalty called on the play, though Pacioretty will be hearing from the NHL on Monday for this hit.




If that wasn't enough controversy for one night, Letang managed to return to the game for the overtime period and scored the game-winning goal. It was one that left the Canadiens and their fans absolutely livid.

As Pittsburgh's James Neal drove to the net and managed to get a backhand shot on goal, Montreal goaltender Carey Price appeared to have the puck secured underneath his leg, only to have the Penguins continue to dig and poke at the puck while the referees didn't blow the whistle, even though it easily could have been (and perhaps should have been) stopped given how Price had the puck secured.

It was eventually worked free and Letang was there waiting to deposit it into the empty cage. Price responded by breaking his stick off the goal post and then launching it across the ice. It had to be a frustrating moment, given how well he played throughout the game, stopping 38 shots, some of them in spectacular fashion.



And that's the kind of night it was in Montreal.

The fact it was Pacioretty that delivered the hit on Letang instantly resulted in a discussion about last season's incident involving him and Boston's Zdeno Chara, and how critical the Montreal forward was of the league for not suspending Chara for driving him into the turnbuckle along the benches at the Bell Centre. (It should be pointed out that Pacioretty apologized to Letang after the game for Saturday's hit). And that comes just one day after Pittsburgh's Sidney Crosby was criticized by Ottawa's Nick Foligno for elbowing him in the head during a scrum around the net after Crosby called for the banishment of head shots over the summer as he recovered from a concussion.

Crosby spent most of his post-game interview on Saturday answering questions about Foligno's comments the night before, while he defended his actions the night before and pointed to the Pacioretty hit on Letang as the type of play the NHL should be looking to eliminate.

Chaos.

There are so many questions that, at this point, remain unanswered: Why was Paciorrety not penalized? Will the league step in and offer punishment after the fact in the form of a fine or suspension? Why did the refs not stop the play that Letang ultimately scored on? What game were referee's Mike Hasenfratz and Dan O'Rourke watching, and was it as good as the one taking place on the ice in Montreal?

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: November 26, 2011 9:44 am
Edited on: November 26, 2011 9:59 am
 

Foligno 'disappointed' with Crosby

crosby1By: Adam Gretz

In his return to the lineup against the New York Islanders on Monday night, Sidney Crosby wasn't really on the receiving end of any major contact, with Travis Hamonic getting credit for the only hit on him over the course of the game. Over the past two games against the St. Louis Blues and Ottawa Senators it's been a bit of a different story, as not only has Crosby been had more physical contact come his way, he's also finding ways to get involved in it.

Not only is Crosby quickly climbing up the NHL's scoring leaderboard with seven points in his return to the Penguins' lineup, he's also quickly racking up the penalty minutes. In three games this season he's already been assessed eight penalty minutes, which is as many as his controversial teammate, Matt Cooke, has managed to rack up in 23 games.

Early in the third period of Pittsburgh's 6-3 win over the Ottawa Senators on Friday night, Crosby was issued a two-minute minor for elbowing Senators forward Nick Foligno following some contact between Foligno and Pittsburgh's goaltender, Marc-Andre Fleury (poor video quality here).

Foligno was also sent off for roughing.

Following the game Foligno spoke out about he was "disappointed" that Crosby would do that.

"I just said you've been talking about it all summer, and then you go and do that," said Foligno. "I was just disappointed that he would do that. I fell over Fleury and Crosby is hitting me, so I look up, I see it's him, and I'm not going to do anything, and then he elbows me in the head. I just kind of got a little frustrated that he would do something like that, so I went back at him. It's not a big deal, but it is something he preached all summer about that we should limit that, and then he goes and does it, so I was just a little disappointed. But, you know, that's a small part of the game and it's over now."

As he recovered from his concussion, Crosby was outspoken about eliminating hits to the head. During his first press conference back in September he was asked if the NHL should have a complete banishment on all head shots, and he responded with, "I don't think there's a reason not to take them out," before pointing out that probably only 50-60 hits that happen over the course of an NHL season are a hit to the head, and that the NHL would not miss such a small number of plays.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
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