Tag:Ryan Strome
Posted on: October 13, 2011 1:28 pm
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Daily Skate: Sabres being careful with Hecht

By Brian Stubits

HECHT OUT: The Buffalo Sabres will be without Jochen Hecht, who suffered a concussion until at least next week as the team is being especially careful with him considering he has a history of concussions. He will be out at least through Saturday's game at Pittsburgh. (Sabres Edge)

GO FISH: Speak of concussions, Capitals GM George McPhee and member of the NHL and NHLPA concussion working group, talked about them recently. Noting that of course you have to be concerned about the players, a non-physical game just isn't as entertaining. “If you go to Europe … it’s not very entertaining. It’s highly skilled, but it’s like trying to watch two guys fish.” (Washington Times)

ROLOSON THANKS SNOW: Dwayne Roloson returns to Long Island to face the Islanders for the first time since he was traded to the Tampa Bay Lightning last season. And the 42-year-old took the time to say thanks to GM Garth Snow. "When I signed, Garth told me the situation and to his credit he stuck to his word, that when we were out of the playoffs, he would trade me. Very appreciative of what he did" (ESPN New York)

SERGE OF MOTIVATION: The boo birds have found a target of Sergei Gonchar in Ottawa. Unhappy with his performance, the Senators fans have let him know. His coach Paul MacLean suggests he uses it to his advantage. “I’ve been booed, so it’s something that you ... I think it’s a motivator. If your fans are unhappy with how you play, they should express that they’re unhappy with how you play. Conversely, if you play better, they should appreciate that you play better and to me, it’s just a signal that you need to be better.” (Senators Exra

THE UNTOUCHABLES: Here is a list compiled of the 10 most untradeable contracts in the NHL. Not surprisingly it starts with Rick DiPietro. But after seeing Brian Campbell change addresses this summer makes me think in this this era of a salary cap floor, no contract is untradeable. (The Hockey News)

FISHER STORY: Mike Fisher of the Nashville Predators is very open about his strong religious faith. He has said in the past one thing he likes about being in Nashville as opposed to Ottawa is the amount of churches. Last summer he came out with a book Defender of Faith about his story. Here's a little more from Fisher on how it came about. (Predators Insider)

BROTHER BOND: When the Toronto Maple Leafs headed to a military camp for a team-bonding retreat, it made defenseman John-Micheal Liles think of his brother stationed in Washington state with the U.S. Navy. Here's a good story on the strong relationship the brothers have. (Globe and Mail)

STROME SENT DOWN: It's about the time of the season where a lot of the rookies who were getting extended looks out of camp are going to be returned to their junior teams beore contracts kick in. That's what the Islanders did with their first pick in this summer's draft, Ryan Strome. (Islanders team site)

MURPHY TOO: The Carolina Hurricanes did the same with their top pick, sending diminutive Ryan Murphy back to Kitchener of the OHL. In Murphy's case, he had been a healthy scratch in the team's four regular-season games, so it seemed pointless to continue to leave him up. (Hurricanes team site)

GABRIEL'S GOAL: One first-round pick who won't be returning to his junior squad is Colorado Avalanche rookie Gabriel Landeskog. The No. 2 pick in the draft scored his first NHL goal (video below) on Wednesday night in a win over the Columbus Blue Jackets, and he talked to Adrian Dater about it afterward. (All Things Avs)

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: August 19, 2011 6:00 pm
Edited on: August 19, 2011 6:05 pm
 

Debating which 80s dynasty returns first

80sDynasty

By: Adam Gretz and Brian Stubits

Even though they've struggled in recent years, the Edmonton Oilers and New York Islanders were the two most dominant teams in the NHL during the 1980s. Adam Gretz and Brian Stubits debate which one of these franchises with promising young talent returns to glory first.

Adam Gretz: The Edmonton Oilers and the New York Islanders were the two most dominant teams of the 1980s. How dominant? Between 1980 and 1990 they combined to win nine of the 11 Stanley Cups, with Edmonton winning five (and owning the last half of the decade) and the Islanders winning four (and owning the first half of the decade). Recently the two teams have fallen on some tougher times. Both teams are looking for new buildings, and postseason success has been few and far between, as have actual trips to the postseason. The Islanders haven't won a playoff series since 1993 with only four playoff appearances since then, while Edmonton, outside of its Stanley Cup Final trip in 2005-06, hasn't advanced past the first round since 1998.

I don't think, at this point, either one of these teams are a playoff team right now, but which one do you think returns to glory first? Or is closest?

Brian Stubits: I'm not convinced the Islanders aren't a playoff team this year. They will be in contention to the end is my guess at this point. I am really liking the nucleus they are putting together. As for Edmonton, I don't see a team that's ready to battle for the playoffs yet. In their rebuilding phases, I think the Isles are ahead of the Oilers, as you would expect considering they had a slight head start in the bad seasons department.

Gretz: I think the Islanders might be closer (or more likely) to simply earning a playoff spot this season because the Eastern Conference is probably a bit easier for them to potentially sneak in than the Western Conference is for Edmonton. But I still like Edmonton's group of forwards and think, at this point, they have a bit more upside, especially with back-to-back No. 1 overall picks in Taylor Hall and Ryan Nugent-Hopkins. Hall looks like he's on his way to being a player, and assuming Nugent-Hopkins becomes the player he's expected to become, that's quite a core. Add in players Jordan Eberle, Magnus Paajarvi and, heck, even an older (relatively speaking, as he's still only 28) player like Ales Hemsky who is close to a point-per-game player when he's healthy (and that always seems to be the key for him) and that's an impressive group. You win with impact players, and Edmonton has quite a few impact players up front.

Stubits: We think they have impact players. Hall and Nugent-Hopkins have a long way to go to get to that level. I agree, it looks like the Oilers are future impact players, but there are no guarantees of that, especially seeing as though Nugent-Hopkins hasn't skated in an NHL game yet. Don't forget the Islanders have been drafting high, including getting the No. 1 spot themselves in recent years. John Tavares is showing he too has a bright future ahead of him, leading the team in points last season with 67. The Isles had six players total more than any Oiler, who were led by Jordan Eberle at 43 points. But New York has a trio of 30-goal scorers now (well, 29-plus) in Tavares (29 last season), Michael Grabner (34 goals) and Matt Moulson (31). Plus, the organization feels like they drafted a winner in Ryan Strome earlier this summer. I know you remember his skills, Adam, considering this post you put up. There is impact on the island, too.

Gretz: Yes, potential impact, that's obviously what I meant. I mean, a lot of this is talking about upside and projection because both teams are dealing with potential and question marks. The one thing I will say is both teams seem to have some concerns on the back end with their defense and goaltending. The Islanders are locked into Rick DiPietro for what seems like forever, while the Oilers have Nikolai Khabibulin and a bunch of question marks behind him. Devan Dubynk was a first-round pick back in 2004, and had a solid sophomore campaign last season, but no matter which guy is between the pipes, the defense in front of them is going to struggle this year. It needs a serious upgrade.

Again, I don't expect the Oilers to be a playoff team this season (in fact, they'll probably be near the bottom of the conference again, which could lead to another potential impact player in the 2012 draft, which will only help the future -- and yes, eventually you want to stop picking at the top of the draft), but that's not really what I'm looking for here: I'm looking at which team becomes a true contender for the Stanley Cup, not just simply making the playoffs, and I just think their core group of forwards offers a bit more potential and upside and the ability to help turn a franchise around than the Islanders core.

Stubits: I think you might be underrating the Islanders' organizational depth. In July, puckprospectus.com proclaimed the Islanders the second best in talent in the system, highlighting Kiril Kabonov and Matt Donovan in addition to recent draft picks Strome and Scott Mayfield. I understand the concerns in net, but this is a team that has one luxury: it has three goaltenders on the payroll that there's a decent chance one of them can be good enough to play behind an improving and maturing defense.

The team's biggest obstacle right now isn't cultivating talent, it's being appealing to free agents. A team can usually build the core of it's franchise through the draft, but it's the final free-agent and trade pieces that put a team over the top. Until the Isles get their arena situation squared away, that won't happen. Nobody wants to make a commitment to an organization that they don't know its whereabouts in four years. The sooner they can resolve this issue, the better, because I believe they have a very nice foundation at this point to win. As already stated, I think the Islanders will be a borderline playoff team this year, and by following logic they grow from there. It's a very young roster. That's why I like them to get back to that elite level first, they should continue to grow together and I think there are some very talented prospects in there.

Gretz: Yes, the Islanders certainly have a strong group, and you may be right that I'm underrating what they have, but I guess at the end of the day, for me, it simply comes down to thinking the Oilers players (particularly Hall and Nugent-Hopkins as top overall picks) have a bit more upside, and we've seen with other teams how much of an impact two young players like that can make. Granted, they need the complementary players around them and an upgrade on defense, but I still really like what Edmonton is building up front and the potential they have. Maybe not this year, but soon.

Stubits: Not that I have any reason to whatsoever, but I feel like Garth Snow has built himself a solid enough core. It's shocking to type that. I guess we'll find out in a couple of years.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey, @agretz and @brianstubitsNHL on Twitter.
Posted on: August 18, 2011 10:10 pm
 

Shootout skills on display at RDO Camp Day 2

By Brian Stubits

While the NHL Research and Development Camp is mostly about testing new ideas and changes to the game, it's also about getting a look at some of the top prospect for next summer's draft. And a chance for said prospects to show a thing or two.

When it came time for a skills competition, a few guys showed off some serious skills.

Check out Mathew Campagna go at the goalie with one hand and the puck off the ice.

There have some excellent displays, many of them this summer. There was Linus Omark. We saw one from Isles prospect Ryan Strome. And there was this from Israel's Eliezer Sherbatov. But this attempt in particular is as impressive as I have seen. I don't much care that it didn't go in the net, the ability that takes is tremendous.

These shootout attempts are quickly starting to rival the NBA's slam dunk contest for me. It's the sport's equivalent and I am finding it as entertaining to watch them as the outdated dunks.

But the prospects weren't done. Not to be out done, Andreas Athanasiou took his shot, getting the puck airborne and punching it over the goalie and into the cage between his legs.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: July 16, 2011 11:09 pm
Edited on: July 17, 2011 10:22 am
 

Ryan Strome shows off his shootout skill

By: Adam Gretz

The New York Islanders were one of the many teams holding prospect development camps this week, including Saturday nights Blue and White scrimmage. The night was capped off with a shootout that featured first-round pick Ryan Strome doing, well ... this.



Sure, it's a lot easier to try that in July during a shootout in a prospect camp than it is during a regular season shootout that actually matters in the standings, but come on, that's pretty awesome.

Strome was the 5th overall pick in last month's Entry Draft after putting up huge numbers (33 goals and 73 assists in 65 games) with the Niagara Ice Dogs of the Ontario Hockey League. He's another promising, talented young player added to the Islanders organization in recent years to go along with players like John Tavares, Kyle Okposo, Nino Niederreiter, Josh Bailey and Michael Grabner, just to name a few.

(Video via Puck Daddy's Sean Leahy on Twitter)

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnhl and @agretz on Twitter.
Category: NHL
Posted on: June 23, 2011 11:45 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 3:21 pm
 

NHL Draft Top 10: Nugent-Hopkins No. 1

Perhaps this year's draft doesn't have the same excitement as years past. Perhaps it might not have the true superstar potential others have had. Taylor vs. Tyler? No doubt about Stamkos? There just isn't the same kind of buzz.

It took until recently for the top prospect to really establish himself as such, and that's Ryan Nugent- Hopkins. Perhaps the reason the excitement about him as the top prospect isn't as high as it has been for others in recent years is the way in which he plays. You don't figure him to be a guy like Stamkos who comes out and by the time he's old enough to drink alcohol is one of the leading lamp-lighters in the NHL.

"I'm more of playmaker. I like to score and if I'm on my game, I can do that," Nugent-Hopkins told CBSSports.com in the middle of the Stanley Cup Finals. "I'm definitely more of a pass-first type of player."

So the guy might not play the game exactly like one of his heroes, Maurice "Rocket" Richard. So what? I'm stating the obvious here, but you don't have to score to be an impact player on offense.

The biggest knock he has had to overcome, though, has been his size and people wondering if he'll be durable enough to handle playing center in the NHL.

"I definitely need to gain some weight and put some muscle on," Nugent-Hopkins said. "Seeing these [NHL] guys in the hall, they’re all men. They are all big guys. I need to put some weight on and work on every aspect of my game."

What that criticism fails to mention, however, is his great skating ability, elusiveness and defensive responsibility.

"His vision, his creativity, his intelligence and his understanding of the game, and the skill package that goes with it is what make him so special," said Jesse Wallin, his coach and VP of hockey operations for the WHL's Red Deer Rebels. "He's got tremendous hands and passing ability, he's got a great release, he's a great skater, he's got tremendous agility ... it's just a really special package and a personality and makeup that allows him to utilize that skill set."

Just because there hasn't been a headlining story for the draft doesn't mean it doesn't have a headliner. Nugent-Hopkins fits that bill, and he thinks he would be a pretty good fit with the team picking No. 1.

"I think I can help [the Oilers] in the rebuilding stage that they're in. If I got drafted there, I could definitely learn a lot from all of them."

And we'll learn a lot more about him.

(Shameless plug: Join A.J. Perez and I with our live draft chat on Friday evening. The draft begins at 7 ET from St. Paul, Minn.)

1. C Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, 6-0/177, Red Deer (WHL): Before the combine a couple weeks ago, there were doubts about Nugent-Hopkins as the best overall player because of his size. That was until he surprised scouts by coming in heavier than expected. "For the past few years, it's been tough to put weight on. I think I'm starting to mature more now. I'm filling out a little more. I put on six pounds this summer. I think I finally started putting some weight on," Nugent-Hopkins told CBSSports.com. He is the true definition of a play-making center, leading the WHL in assists last season with 75 while scoring 31 goals for the Rebels. NHL Central Scouting's Peter Sullivan had this to day: "A couple of people high up -- and not naming names -- said Hopkins has the best vision since No. 99." How about that for pressure? Oh, and he's really fast. Yes, there's a reason why he's everybody's No. 1. Player profile

2. C Jonathan Huberdeau, 6-1/170, Saint John (QMJHL): Has already been drafted once this year -- sixth overall in the KHL draft in May. Needless to say, he's not going to report. That's because Huberdeau is one of the elite prospects available. Understanding Nugent-Hopkins is the top prospect, I have a hunch Huberdeau could be the best player down the line. He's a player that is seen as a center, but could possibly play left wing at the next level. He became the face of Saint John's run to the Memorial Cup, setting new club records in points (105) and assists (62) that went along with 43 goals and a league-high plus-59. When asked by CBSSports.com what he has been focusing on, Huberdeau answered: "Consistency. I want to be more consistent in my game. My skating, my speed, I want to get better at. I have been working on that all season long. I work on everything. Nobody is perfect, so you have to work on all the areas." Player profile

3. LW Gabriel Landeskog, 6-0/207, Kitchener (OHL): It seems pretty clear Landeskog is the top winger available, and he might also be the most NHL-ready player in the draft. His upside might not be as high as some other skaters in the draft, but the ceiling is still great and he figures to be a very good scorer in little time. Playing for the Rangers of the OHL, Landeskog had 36 goals and 30 assists in 53 games. His leadership qualities stand out, too, as he was the youngest to be named captain for Kitchener in 30 years. He draws comparisons to Mike Richards, who also played for Kitchener. "I'm a hard-working two-way player. I think I can play on all situations on the ice. That's who I am," Landeskog told CBSSports.com. Player profile

4. D Adam Larsson, 6-3/200, Skelleftea (Sweden): The near-consensus top defenseman available, and we're not going to disagree. He has great size and moves very well, too. He isn't a guy guy who will give you a lot of scoring, but he does do a good job of moving the puck up top. In 37 games this season, he had just one goal and eight assists, but the team that picks him won't be looking for much offense. Not to say he can't develop more of an offensive game, but right now his strength lies in defense. Player highlights

5. C Sean Couturier, 6-4/197, Drummondville (QMJHL): He has fallen down the boards some since being the preseason favorite as the top prospect. He has faced criticism for his less-than ideal speed and explosiveness. Couturier was still good enough this season to be named the QMJHL's MVP over Huberdeau after a 36-goal, 60-assist campaign. One thing that scouts love in addition to his size is his defensive abilities as he is a true two-way player. He will still be a highly coveted player with a big frame already. Player profile

6. D Dougie Hamilton, 6-4/187, Niagara (OHL): Impressed folks at the combine with his stature, Hamilton is a guy with a ton of potential to help a blue line for a long time. He is very capable of handling the puck and according to his OHL coach Marty Williamson: "When he sees those opportunities to jump into the rush or lead the rush, I believe it's untapped what he can do." His 12 goals and 46 assists in 67 games show he would bring a lot of value to a power-play unit. "I think I'm a complete guy, so I don't really have any weaknesses that stand out. I just want to improve on everything. At this point, I want to get stronger," Hamilton told CBSSports.com. Player profile

7. C Ryan Strome, 6-1/175, Niagara (OHL): Along the line of Nugent-Hopkins and Huberdeau, he is a playmaker, as he displayed by posting 33 goals and 73 assists in 65 games for Niagara, and being named the OHL East's best playmaker by coaches. Strome is also a guy willing to get physical and into the tough spots, showing a nice ability to wield the stick on tip-in opportunities. To further see how well he can handle the hockey stick, just watch this sick goal -- he just might be the best scorer of all the centers available. Player profile

8. D Ryan Murphy, 5-10/166, Kitchener (OHL): There are people worried about his small stature, but he's a guy who can play. He's probably the best offensive defenseman available, as evidenced by his 26 goals and 53 assists in 63 games for the Rangers. He is very good with the puck, but perhaps has the ability to be too creative as he has to watch the turnovers. Regardless, he would fit nicely at the point with the man up. Skates very well too, always a plus to have on the blue line. Player profile

9. LW Sven Baertschi, 5-10/181, Portland (WHL): Put up great numbers as a rookie in the WHL, leading the league's freshmen with 85 points -- 34 goals and 51 assists -- while demonstrating great vision on the ice. He's the kind of guy teams love because of his work ethic. Per Portland coach Mike Johnston: "Quick, skilled, very fast type of player. ... I don't think anyone can stay on the ice as long as he does. We have to tell him to get off the ice 45 minutes after practice ends. He stays out there forever to work on his game. He works on inside-outside moves, quick shots and little foot movement."

10. D Nathan Beaulieu, 6-2/174, St. John (QMJHL): Beaulieu is enjoying a rise as the draft draws near thanks largely to the Sea Dogs winning the Memorial Cup with his plus-44 on the year. In 21 postseason games, he had 16 points (4G, 12A) after a 12-33-35 regular season. He is a defenseman that thinks offense, so he does have some improving to do on the defensive end. According to his QMJHL coach Gerard Gallant: "He's gotten better, bigger and stronger, he's playing a lot better defensively." Player profile

-- Brian Stubits

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnhl on Twitter or @BrianStubitsNHL

Posted on: June 22, 2011 12:32 pm
 

NHL Draft positional rankings: Centers

If your favorite team is in the market for a good young center (and who isn't?) then this year is for you. The cream of the NHL Draft crop can be spotted in dotted spots.

Everybody has pretty much settled on Ryan Nugent-Hopkins being the best player in the draft, but it took a long time to come to that conclusion because there are more than a couple of guys who were in that conversation, two of the others also being centers.

Point is, if you aren't picking first (and unless you are Edmonton -- or possibly Florida as, trade rumors speculate -- you aren't) don't worry, there is plenty of talent to be had up the middle.

1. Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, 6'0/177, Red Deer (WHL): Before the combine a couple weeks ago, there were doubts about Nugent-Hopkins as the best overall player because of his size. That was until he surprised scouts by coming in 13 pounds heavier than expected. He is the true definition of a play-making center, leading the WHL in assists last season with 75 while scoring 31 goals for the Rebels. NHL Central Scouting's Peter Sullivan had this to day: "A couple of people high up -- and not naming names -- said Hopkins has the best vision since No. 99." How about that for pressure? Oh, and he's really fast. Yes, there's a reason why he's everybody's No. 1.

2. Jonathan Huberdeau, 6'1/170, Saint John (QMJHL): Has already been drafted once this year, being selected sixth overall in the KHL draft in May. Needless to say, he's not going to report. That's because Huberdeau is one of the elite prospects available. He's a player that is seen as a center, but could possibly play left wing at the next level. He became the face of Saint John's run to the Memorial Cup, setting new club records in points (105) and assists (62) that went along with 43 goals and a league-high plus-59. Central Scouting's Chris Bordeleau says "He definitely has NHL hands and playmaking ability." Sounds about right.

3. Sean Couturier, 6'4/197, Drummondville (QMJHL): He has fallen down the boards some since being the preseason favorite as the top prospect, facing criticism for his less-than ideal speed and explosiveness. Couturier was still good enough this season to be named the QMJHL's MVP over Huberdeau after a 36-goal, 60-assist campaign. One thing that scouts love in addition to his size is his defensive abilities as he is a true two-way player. He will still be a highly coveted player with a big frame already. Player profile

4. Ryan Strome, 6'1/175, Niagara (OHL): Along the line of Nugent-Hopkins and Huberdeau, he is a playmaker, posting 33 goals and 73 assists in 65 games for Niagara, being named the OHL East's best playmaker by coaches. Strome is also a guy willing to get physical and into the tough spots, showing a nice ability to wield the stick on tip-in opportunities. To further see how well he can handle the hockey stick, just watch this sick goal -- he just might be the best scorer of all the centers available. Player profile

5. Mika Zibanejad, 6'2/190, Djurgarden (Sweden): Already possessing the size many teams look for in a center, Zibanejad is a physical force who is hard to knock off the puck and is a big-time hitter (see!). His production in the Swedish Elite League wasn't much (five goals, four assists in 26 games) -- but that's good for a teenager in that league. He popped onto many radars with his five goals and four assists in just six games at the World U-17s. He's the type of player about whom you will hear such superlatives as "high-motor guy" and "plays the right way." Player highlights

6. Mark McNeill, 6'2/201, Prince Albert (WHL): McNeill is not the most physically gifted center available, but he is one of the centers who plays tough at both ends of the ice. He saw a massive jump in his numbers from last season to this, when he scored 32 goals with 49 assists in 70 games, up from 24 points the season before. But that can easily be chalked up to maturing more as a player. One intriguing aspect is that he's a right-handed center, something a lot of teams could use. Player highlights

7. Zack Phillips, 6'1/178, Saint John (QMJHL): Yet another Sea Dog to make it on one of the prospect lists, is it any wonder Saint John won the Memorial Cup? A linemate of Huberdeau, Phillips has enough skills to have distinguished himself on a stacked team. According to coach Gerard Gallant: "Zack has great vision and is strong on the puck. He's a solid center and has come a long way in a short time. He kind of reminds me of an Adam Oates-type of player." Not bad. Stats wise, he had 38 goals and 57 assists in 67 regular-season games. Player highlights

8. Vladislav Namestnikov, 6'0/166, London (OHL): The Russian native led the way for the Knights with 30 goals this season, his first in the OHL. He projects at a center but could end up playing on the outside. At this point, he doesn't quite have the size you'd look for out of a centerman. According to Central Scouting's Jack Edwards: "Vlad plays a high-energy, two-way game he's very aggressive on the forecheck and backcheck and has the ability to beat defenders outside and cut back to the net. He has an excellent wrist shot that he can release with accuracy on the rush." Player profile

9. Boone Jenner, 6'1/204, Oshawa (OHL): Jenner is one of those players that doesn't really do anything great but does everything well. He does the stuff that earns him the labels like gritty -- forechecking and backchecking well, blocking shots, going into heavy traffic, etc. Leading a line featuring two other draft prospects, he scored 25 goals and had 41 assists in 63 games. He might not be a top-line center in the NHL, but that doesn't mean he won't be a reliable and good player for a long time. Player highlights

10. Shane Prince, 5'10/174, Ottawa (OHL): Hailing from Upstate New York, Prince hardly passes the sniff test with his smaller stature. But what he lacks there he makes up for in his speed as he flies on the ice. He clearly has good vision and knows what to do with the puck, racking up 63 assists and 25 goals in 59 games this season. “I've been doubted my whole life, from day one. I was either too small -- I was a bit of a late-bloomer -- and I've seemed to prove those people wrong my whole life," Prince says. Not exactly Rudy, but he's got a bit of American bulldog in him (just watch the highlights, fights and all). Player highlights

-- Brian Stubits

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnhl on Twitter or @BrianStubitsNHL

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com