Tag:Saku Koivu
Posted on: February 16, 2012 2:26 pm
Edited on: February 16, 2012 2:32 pm
 

Can Ducks complete comeback and make playoffs?

Selanne and Anaheim can see the eighth spot now. (Getty Images)

By Brian Stubits

This is shaping up just like a Disney movie. They could call this one The Mighty Ducks. Oh, wait ...

Go back about two months and you'd find the Anaheim Ducks left for dead. They were playing the Columbus Blue Jackets with the loser taking the lead in the Fail for Nail (Yukupov, top draft prospect this year) race. That's how far in the dumps they were.

A look at the standings today after their 2-1 win in Pittsburgh Wednesday night reveals the Ducks are only six measly points out of a playoff position with 25 games to go. Meanwhile, they are now 17 points up on the Jackets, having passed six other teams on the way up.

It has people wondering if they can do the unthinkable, pull of a remarkable comeback and sneak into the playoffs. In looking at the bubble teams earlier this week, colleague Adam Gretz estimated the Ducks will roughly have to finish the season 20-6-0. That could possibly come down. Perhaps an 18-7-1 record could be enough. Those three fewer points make it seem a lot less daunting, don't they?

The point is, the odds are still long. But are they too long for the Ducks?

Remember how they finished last season, on a tear that took them to the playoffs and Corey Perry to the Hart Trophy as league MVP. Anaheim closed out the season going 15-5-0. Considering it's mostly the same group of guys just with their No. 1 goaltender actually on the ice this time, why couldn't they put together a similar record this year?

I don't have a good reason for you other than it would mean stretching this strong run out for much longer and the odds of a team staying that hot for that long aren't good. Then again, they did stay so cold for so long earlier this season.

With Perry, Bobby Ryan, Ryan Getzlaf, Teemu Selanne and the rest of the crew scoring goals again -- something they weren't doing earlier this season -- it's possible. When they are on, that's one of the most talented group of players you'll find in the game.

You'd think the road-heavy schedule might be the big obstacle, and it well could be. But right now they are halfway through an eight-game road trip and have picked up seven of the eight possible points so far.

If it happens that the Ducks do find themselves sneaking into the playoffs, I can't imagine there will be a team that would want that first-round matchup. Also, you can anticipate hearing some calls for Bruce Boudreau to win the Jack Adams Award as the league's top coach. A turnaround like that would put him in the conversation with Ken Hitchcock, John Tortorella, Kevin Dineen and more. Imagine that, a coach winning the Jack Adams in the same season he was fired.

Personally, I wouldn't say Boudreau would be deserving of the Adams. No, I'd vote Bob Murray for general manager of the year over Florida's Dale Tallon. Remember, it wasn't the hiring of Boudreau that was the impetus for this surge, it was Murray threatening to trade everybody but Selanne and Saku Koivu. Talk about a kick in the pants.

I'm going to go out on the limb and say I think the Ducks will get it done and make the playoffs. Unfathomable two months ago, I'm going to say I'm one of the believers now. What's your call?

More from Eye on Hockey

Ducks believe in miracles
Murray says players available
NHL's playoff race

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: February 2, 2012 4:37 pm
Edited on: February 2, 2012 4:38 pm
 

Ducks believe in miracles, their shirts show it

It would certainly be a miracle for Anaheim to make the playoffs. (Twitpic)

By Brian Stubits

Do you believe in miracles?

The Anaheim Ducks' answer is Yes!

Not long ago, the Ducks were playing so poorly that their general manager Bob Murray first fired well-respected head coach Randy Carlyle then threatened to trade anybody not named Saku Koivu or Teemu Selanne. The most discussed player was Bobby Ryan.

Since then, the Ducks have been one of the hottest teams in the league. They recently went through an 8-1-1 stretch. Still, they are 10 points behind the Minnesota Wild for the last playoff spot with four more teams between them.

You'd have better odds fielding an Olympic hockey team from Brazil than you would the Ducks do of making the playoffs. Too extreme? OK, I'll just go with what Orange County Register columnist Jeff Miller who compared the Ducks' chances of making the playoffs to Ron Paul earning the Republican presidential nomination.

But don't tell the players who, as plainly seen above, still believe.

Don't get your hopes up, fans. Oh sure, you can hope all you want they pull of a miracle down there in Disney land that could inspire the next Mighty Ducks movie. I'm referring to the getting your hands on the shirt. Sorry, it's only for the players. Because, you know, they have to make sure everybody knows they believe, maybe they'll convince themselves it can happen.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: January 7, 2012 3:07 pm
Edited on: January 7, 2012 3:10 pm
 

Remaining cap hits for Ducks players in trade

DucksBy: Adam Gretz

The Anaheim Ducks are struggling through a brutal season that's seen the team win just 11 of its first 39 games and, as of Saturday afternoon, get outscored by a larger margin than any other team in the league. Nothing is going right, and last week general manager Bob Murray made it known that just about every player on his roster not named Teemu Selanne or Saku Koivu is in play, which is definitely an intriguing start to the trading season.

Even though the team is lousy right now, and Selanne and Koivu are off the market, that still leaves quite a list of players that would be attractive to just about every other team in the league, including Ryan Getzlaf, Bobby Ryan and Corey Perry among others. Ryan's name was in trade rumors earlier this season, right around the team changed coaches, bringing in former Capitals coach Bruce Boudreau to replace Randy Carlyle, and nothing came of the rumors at that time. Who knows what's going to happen now that there's an "open for business" sign hanging on the front door.

For a team to complete a trade for one of Anaheim's many marketable players it's not only going to need an offer of players and draft picks that fits what the Ducks want and need, that team also needs enough salary cap space for the remainder of the season to make such a move, and a lot of these guys aren't cheap. When an in-season trade is made the team is responsible for a prorated portion of the players salary cap hit for that season, and it's determined by the number of days remaining in the season when the trade is completed.

To help figure out how much of a players cap hit a team is responsible for, the folks at CapGeek have a calculator that figures out the remaining value on each contract.

Below is a quick table for how much salary cap space a team would need to acquire one of Anaheim's top players this season on the following dates: January 7 (the present date), January 21, February 1, February 15 and the NHL's trade deadline, which falls on February 27 this season.

Does your team have the combination of players that can fill Anaheim's needs/wants as well as the available cap space?

Remaining Salary Cap Value: Anaheim Ducks, 2011-12 Season
Player 2011-12 Cap Value Jan. 7 Jan. 21 Feb. 1 Feb. 15 Feb. 27
Ryan Getzlaf $5.32 Million $2.61 Million $2.21 Million $1.89 Million $1.49 Million $1.15 Million
Corey Perry $5.32 Million $2.61 Million $2.21 Million $1.89 Million $1.49 Million $1.15 Million
Bobby Ryan $5.10 Million $2.50 Million $2.12 Million $1.81 Million $1.43 Million $1.10 Million
Lubomir Visnovsky $5.60 Million $2.75 Million $2.33 Million $1.99 Million $1.57 Million $1.21 Million
Jonas Hiller $4.50 Million $2.21 Million $1.87 Million $1.60 Million $1.26 Million $972,000
Francois Beauchemin $3.80 Million $1.86 Million $1.58 Million $1.35 Million $1.06 Million $821,000
Toni Lydman $3.00 Million $1.45 Million $1.24 Million $1.07 Million $843,243 $648,000

Getzlaf, Perry, Visnovsky, Beauchemin and Lydman are all signed through the end of next season. Hiller is signed through the 2013-14 season and Ryan is locked up through the 2014-15 season.

Photo: Getty Images


For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.
Posted on: January 5, 2012 10:50 am
Edited on: February 2, 2012 3:53 pm
 

Ducks GM says all but Selanne, Koivu available

By Brian Stubits

Pick a Duck, any Duck. You can have him if the price is right.

That was pretty much the message that Anaheim Ducks GM Bob Murray sent to the NHL on Wednesday. The only difference? There are two untouchables: Teemu Selanne and Saku Koivu, two of the Ducks' three players over the age of 36. They each have no-trade clauses. But if Selanne were asked to be traded, then even he'd be available.

The rest; Corey Perry, Bobby Ryan, Ryan Getzlaf, Cam Fowler and the others? Hey, make an offer.

"And the rest of the players in that locker room, I thought they'd figure out when we changed coaches that time was running, the clock was running quickly here. And I don't care who you talked about," Murray said after the Ducks' 3-1 loss to the Sharks on Wednesday.

"But we will not go to draft picks. It's not my intention."

So it has come to this. I don't think many saw this happening in Anaheim this season. Was it a team with flaws coming into the year? Of course. There's not a lot of depth at the forward position and the defense could be better as a unit.

But who saw Jonas Hiller struggling this much after dealing with vertigo last season? Who saw a team with Perry, Ryan, Getzlaf and Selanne struggling so much to score goals? Who saw the Ducks having only 10 wins though 38 games?

Not many, if any. A coaching change didn't work. Letting the players try and work through it hasn't gone so well. What's left then but to head to the trade market with some amazing assets?

So let the rebuilding begin, right? Well we're going to play a little semantics game and say no. Let the retooling begin.

"We're going to get ready for next year," Murray said.

"I think this team can be turned around to make the playoffs next year. I think it's going to be hard to do it this year but I do want them to make a run. But it's got to happen quick. Everybody knows that. ... Let's start playing better hockey."

Honestly, at this point the last thing I'd hope for if I'm Murray is false hope. This hole is pretty much insurmountable. My colleague Adam Gretz detailed that in a recent edition of Pucks and Numbers.

Murray is in a better place than most GMs trying to do the same. He has a lot of desirable players at relatively cheap prices to move. It's pretty easy to get talented players to help you compete now when dealing from such a position of strength.

The hottest name for most of the season, of course, has been Bobby Ryan. Just before Randy Carlyle was fired, there was a lot of speculation that Ryan was going to be the one hitting the road, not Carlyle. Instead, Carlyle was replaced by Bruce Boudreau and Ryan was seemingly pulled off the block. That didn't last long.

It's a really tough spot for Murray. On one hand, the need for change is obvious. This roster just isn't getting it done. On the other hand his trio of Ryan, Getzlaf and Perry is incredibly talented, young and reasonably priced. That's a great mix, who would actually want to get rid of that? Hence, rock and a hard place. How many of the available players do you trade? All of them? Just one?

"I still believe we have some core players. Now, whether we have to change a few core players, so be it," Murray said. "They're deciding who's staying and who's not staying at this point."

I'd anticipate Murray being pelted with offer after offer for any one of these guys. Of course the price will be high. Murray has made it clear that he wants proven NHL talent in return. What team wouldn't want to get its hands on any of Anaheim's top players?

And I'll just throw this out there: The Anaheim Ducks and Toronto Maple Leafs have done business with one another plenty of times in the past.

Now have fun playing with Cap Geek's trade calculator. See if your favorite team can swing a deal.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: November 2, 2011 1:02 pm
Edited on: November 2, 2011 7:53 pm
 

Slumping Ducks finding 'a way to lose right now'

By Brian Stubits

WASHINGTON -- This was going to be a story about the ageless wonder that is Teemu Selanne when the game was 4-2. If you had to name the best player on the ice in D.C. on Tuesday night, it would be the 41-year-old Finn. He had two goals. He assisted on Anaheim's other two. Simply put, he is still sensational.

After his four-point game, he now has 14 points in 12 games. Again, he is 41. I was getting my "Teemu Selanne is so awesome ..." jokes warmed up. Seriously, we haven't seen this type of production from somebody over 40 since Gordie Howe.

But then his team lost its lead and, well, it sort of changed the feeling in the room. (Good thing, my jokes sucked anyway.)

It was a game the Ducks had in their grasp. It was right there for the taking, all they had to do was hold off Washington's third line from scoring in the final minute. Instead they ended up losing 5-4 in OT, their sixth loss in seven outings.

"We began to self-destruct," coach Randy Carlyle said after the game.

That's just how things are going for the Ducks right now. They finally get some offensive production but the defense doesn't hold up its end of the bargain.

"We just seem to find a way to lose right now," goaltender Jonas Hiller said after the game. "We definitely have to forget about it and concentrate on the good things and I know everybody can play better. I have to start first with myself."

After Tuesday night, that was certainly a fair starting point. This was the second time in his last five starts that Hiller gave up five goals. The time, against Phoenix on Oct. 23, he was pulled.

"He's paid to stop the puck," an angry Carlyle said. "Simple as that."

The play in particular that was most egregious -- or most telling of Anaheim's recent "luck" -- came in the second period with the Ducks up 3-1. In what looked like a breakaway for the offense turned into a push from Caps goalie Tomas Vokoun the length of the ice, stopping just behind the goal line next to his crease. A few seconds later, Dennis Wideman was firing a laser shot into the net.

"What I think what happened was he was indecisive to go," Carlyle said. "I thought he should have played the puck above the goal line, get out of the net and just stop it."

"I thought when our guys were coming back ... I thought one of our guys was coming back because it was an icing," Hiller explained. "I thought 'well, we'll take that icing call' and then I was surprised nobody was there. But that's what I'm saying. Being in the wrong position at the wrong time."

So that was the problem on Tuesday night, goaltending. But it hid one other problem, the lack of offense. Let me explain.

Here are some numbers from the game that really drew my attention: 6-5-4. No, those weren't the daily pick-em lotto numbers, those were the number of shots per period by the Ducks. Add a bagel for the two-plus minutes of overtime and you have 15 shots in 62 minutes.

Entering Tuesday's game, the Ducks were tied with the Islanders for the lowest goals per game at 2.00. Through 12 games now, the Ducks are the third-lowest in the league with 24.8 shots per game. Only three times have they outshot their opponent. On Tuesday, Washington outshot them 40-15. None of those are recipes to winning.

Look at the production from this team, Tuesday included. As a whole, the Ducks have 25 goals on the season. Exactly one of those have come from a forward not on the top two lines on Tuesday; that was Maxime Macenauer's tally. Every other goal has come from a top-six forward of defenseman.

Obviously the top two lines are supposed to do the bulk of the scoring, but there needs to be balance in there.

Andrew Cogliano was just moved off the center position to the wing and bumped up to join Selanne and Saku Koivu on the second line. It looked like a perfect fit, it was clearly Anaheim's best group of forwards on Tuesday. They also have a pretty darn good top line in Corey Perry, Bobby Ryan and Ryan Getzlaf.

"We were playing our game for the first half of the game and we were up 3-0," Perry said when I asked if they were creating enough offense. "We were scoring on our chances. It says a lot right there. When we're skating and moving the puck -- chipping it in, chipping it out, no turnovers -- it's effective.

"We got to look at what we're doing right and take the positives out of the game. A little down right now, but if we bounce back and play the way we did in the first half of the game, we'll be OK."

"All you can do is work harder and battle a little more," Hiller added. "At some point those bounces will go your way but it seems like we aren't trying. Everything seems to bounce against us and that's definitely tough but you can't blame whoever, whatever for that. At the end it's us who are playing out there and it's up to us to work harder to get those bounces.

Maybe they can just double Selanne's shifts?

"He's done his part and he continues to," Carlyle said of the ageless wonder. "Other people have got to step up. Simple situation is we can't accept that from this group."

OK, here is one of those bad Selanne jokes: Teemu Selanne is so awesome, that he made a metal wall cry. (Or maybe that was just from the water bottle he threw at the wall after the game. But I'll choose to believe he made that wall cry. I told you they were bad. Sigh.)

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com