Tag:Stanley Cup
Posted on: December 24, 2011 12:38 pm
Edited on: December 25, 2011 4:33 pm
 

Top NHL stories and moments in 2011

By Brian Stubits

There was a lot of good in 2011, but also a lot of bad. By bad, I really mean tragedy. It was an unforgettable yet forgettable year all at the same time.

As we hit the heart of the holiday season, here is a look back at the year that was in hockey with the top 10 moments/storylines of 2011.

10. Summer acquisitions -- This is when the magic happens in the NHL's salary cap world and franchises are made or destroyed.

It was over the summer that two teams in particular built the nucleus for their surprising starts this season, the Minnesota Wild and Florida Panthers. Minnesota was the host for this year's NHL Entry Draft and really did leave an impression. Not only did they come away from the draft with a few new prospects in their system but they also swung a deal to land Devin Setoguchi from the San Jose Sharks for Brent Burns. The Wild swung another deal with the Sharks that landed them Dany Heatley for Martin Havlat. Of course their biggest summer acquisition might have been the hiring of head coach Mike Yeo.

The Panthers meanwhile continued to use the draft to make their system better and also swung a big trade, taking on Brian Campbell's big salary from the Blackhawks in exchange for Rostislav Olesz. That kicked off a wild spending spree that lasted through free agency and the core of the team that's in first in the Southeast was built just like that. Like the Wild, they also found themselves a new coach who has returned big dividends early in Kevin Dineen.

The unrestricted free-agent class was led by the pursuit of Brad Richards, who eventually signed with the New York Rangers after a day of courting, including from the Maple Leafs while GM Brian Burke was in Afghanistan. But the most intrigue was on the restricted front where Steven Stamkos' future was wildly speculated before re-signing with the Lightning and Shea Weber stayed with the Predators after the biggest arbitration award ever.

A couple weeks in the middle of the year set up the last couple of months in the year and even with what was perceived as a weak free-agent class, this year was no different.

Look back: Free-agency tracker

9. Winter Classic -- As sad as it is to think about, games hardly ever are the top stories in sports any more. But in hockey, the Winter Classic will always matter, it's that big of a showcase and spectacle for the NHL.

As is the case with every Winter Classic -- as fans of all the less-fortunate teams will remind you -- it was a marquee matchup of two high-profile teams from the East with the Washington Capitals and Pittsburgh Penguins. The Caps eventually prevailed in a game that might be the most memorable Winter Classic thus far for a variety of reasons, one of them makes an appearance later on this list.

But first of all the lead up to the game featured the first 24/7: Road to the Winter Classic series on HBO and it was riveting. While technically most of it aired in 2010, it is tied in with the Winter Classic so it counts. It left fans anticipating the next version like a kid awaits Christmas, this year's version featuring the Flyers and Rangers.

Mother Nature also left her mark on the game. It was the first Winter Classic thus far that the weather was so uncooperative that they had to delay the start of the game. Unseasonably warm temperatures and rain in Pittsburgh led to the game being pushed to the night and it did provide a pretty memorable setting at Heinz Field. 

Look back: Caps win Winter Classic 3-1

8. Realignment -- While the fruit of this labor will be seen starting in 2012, it was a large conversation for the entire second half of the year, spurred by a development that appears further up this list.

I don't know if there was a person in hockey -- both within the game and covering it -- that didn't have their own idea for how the realignment should be done. In the end the six-division format was blown up, an effort that was from all accounts led by Gary Bettman himself.

The biggest drama in the whole saga revolved around the Detroit Red Wings' desire to move to the Eastern Conference. Well, without an Eastern Conference to move to any more, I guess you could say that was taken care of.

Look back: NHL announces realignment

7. Lokomotiv plane crash -- The KHL is to the NHL as the NHL is to ESPN. That is to say the only time we ever seem to hear about the KHL is when something bad happens.

Unfortunately, that was the case this summer when the airplane carrying the KHL's Yaroslavl Lokomotiv team barely got airborne before it crashed, killing everybody on board except a member of the flight crew.

The tragedy was already tough enough for the hockey community in North America simply for the fact sheer sadness of the lethal error. But what made it really hit home in the NHL was the number of former NHL players who died in the crash.

Among those who died in the crash were Josef Vasicek, Karlis Skrastins, Ruslan Salei, Pavol Demitra and head coach Brad McCrimmon, all of who were in the NHL at some point in their careers. In the case of McCrimmon he was a member of the Detroit Red Wings coaching staff as recently as last season before he took the chance to be a head coach in Russia.

Nothing from the ordeal was more chilling than the sad, sad story from a professional driver in Dallas who was tasked with picking up the family of Skrastins to drive them to the airport hours after the tragedy. Honestly, I'm getting emotional just thinking about it again. It was truly a horrible day for hockey.

Look back: Lokomovit team plane crashes

6. Vancouver riot -- For the second time in as many Stanley Cup trips for the Vancouver Canucks, the hockey-crazed city erupted into a violent storm following its team's loss in the decisive Game 7. A similar eruption happened in 1994 after the Canucks fell to the New York Rangers.

The night began with a massive gathering in the streets of Vancouver for the fans to all watch the game together on a big screen. Many saw that as an ill-fated moment from the start and boy were they right. Soon after the game and season were finished, the hooligans of Vancouver were just getting started.

Looters took to the streets to cause mayhem, and cause mayhem they did. The result was a night full of rioting embarrassing to the city, a lot of videos to live on in YouTube glory (like this classic), at least 25 people being charged (including Miss Congeniality) and the romance, sports and maybe general photo of the year, the "riot kiss" seen up above.

The unfortunate part (OK, one of them) was the fact that the riot completely overshadowed what was really a great postseason and season for the Canucks. Vancouver was the best team all regular season long and as fine of a year as they ever have.

Look back: Riot erupts after Stanley Cup Finals

5. Brendan Shanahan takes over -- There has been no bigger overarching story in the second half of the year than what Shanahan has been doing as the new head of player safety having replaced Colin Campbell. His arrival on the job has coincided with the attempt to expand and clarify Rule 48.1, the one dealing with headshots. The focus has also been ramped up on boarding.

His impact has been felt from the get-go. In the preseason he was very busy and then really sent some shock waves through the league when he suspended Columbus Blue Jackets defenseman James Wisniewski for eight games.

It's at the point now that every questionable hit is immediately scrutinized and I'm still not sure if that's good or bad. Obviously the good is that it continues to put a microscope on bad hits in an attempt to rid the game of them. On the bad side, some clean hits get more attention than they should and the consistency of punishment applications has been a bit bedeviling, just ask the Sabres fans.

However Shanahan has done something that I've yet to find a person complain about and that's making videos for each and every suspension wherein he explains exactly what the thought process was that led to the decision. The first one he made in the preseason was a breath of fresh air and welcome transparency. All season he's been a busy, busy man.

You know you've watched a lot of Shanahan suspension videos when you can recall that he has done videos in front of three different backdrops and you can tell when he gets a haircut.

Look back: A look at Shanahan's handy work

4. Winnipeg Jets return -- At one point, it looked like the old Jets -- the Phoenix Coyotes -- were going to be the team to move to Winnipeg. Fans were elated as it seemed that with a clear potential ownership group and new, albeit small, arena, the NHL would be coming back to the 'Peg after 15 years.

Then they pulled a little switcheroo on everybody when the Coyotes announced they were staying in Phoenix for another year, so attention turned to the Atlanta Thrashers. A few transactions later and hockey was back in Manitoba (and the NHL had to realign -- Winnipeg in the Southeast?).

The push was one to rename the team the Jets like the old franchise in town and after much debate, the fans won out, although a new logo would be introduced. Not lacking in flair, the Jets showed off their new uniforms in an unveiling at a military base with the players wearing the new duds walking out of a cargo plane.

The first game of the Jets. 2.0 came in their new home at the MTS Centre and they fell in defeat to the Montreal Canadiens, but you couldn't tell. The great hockey city that is Winnipeg was happier than a pig in you-know-what just to have the NHL back. When Nik Antropov became the first player to score for the new Jets, the roar was deafening. Maybe the best way to measure the city's appreciation and love for having hockey back would have been with decibels.

After a slow start (again, they were the Thrashers) the Jets have really come to find a comfort on home ice, as many thought they would. With a 12-6-1 record at home this season, the Jets have the best home mark in the Eastern Conference next to Boston's 13-6-1. It seems that a little excitement really can go a long way.

Look back: Thrashers relocate to Winnipeg

3. Sidney Crosby's concussions -- This was the biggest development to come out of the aforementioned Winter Classic in Pittsburgh. Sidney Crosby caught an elbow to the head from the Capitals' David Steckel that rocked the game's best player pretty good. He certainly appeared out of sorts but was back in the lineup a few days later against the Tampa Bay Lightning.

A check from Victor Hedman led to Crosby experiencing another concussion and he didn't play again for the rest of the season. He finally did return to game action in November, playing eight games before being shut down again for post-concussion symptoms.

Before he went down, Crosby was on pace for one mammoth season. To illustrate how good he was playing before the injury, he still finished the season as the Penguins' leading scorer by a whopping 16 points despite playing only 41 games.

For literally almost a year, the hockey world sat and waited for word on Crosby returning. There was speculation he could come back for the Penguins' playoffs games. There was talk that he might retire. None of that happened, but what did do was bring another reminder of the seriousness that are concussions.

It's not good business for the NHL when the top players aren't on the ice, let alone the best player. I'd like to think it isn't the case, but you have to wonder if Crosby's absence didn't go a long way in facilitating the NHL's actions on trying to remove bad hits as well as enacting strong concussion protocols.

The way the Penguins have handled the Crosby situation has been one of the best parts of all -- or maybe the only good part, depending on your point of view. They have been incredibly patient the entire time, insisting they didn't want to do anything to jeopardize Crosby's health and future.

But because of his most recent setback, Crosby Watch 2011 will move on into Crosby Watch 2012.

Look back: Crosby's recovery efforts

2. Deaths of Derek Boogaard, Rick Rypien, Wade Belak -- The NHL's summer of sorrow began in late spring when the tragic news came down of New York Rangers and former Minnesota Wild enforcer Derek Boogaard's death. The autopsy concluded he died of a lethal mix of alcohol and Oxycodone.

Later in the offseason the NHL was then shook by the news of deaths of Rick Rypien and Wade Belak, separated by only two weeks. Both players were fighters themselves, each suffered from depression and both apparently committed suicide (Rypien's was classified as such, Belak's death treated as such by Toronto PD).

The news of their deaths was sad and shocking in their own right. These were all players 35 or younger who all shared a role in their hockey careers. It was also a catalyst for the discussion of fighting in hockey. No tie can be drawn between each of their deaths and fighting, but it at least begged the question.

Since the three players died, the conversation has picked up. It was really spurred along by the New York Times' in-depth piece that looked at the life of Boogaard and the study of his brain. The findings of the Boston University lab found Boogaard's brain was already showing signs of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a deterioration of the brain due to repeated blows to the head.

Look back: Boogaard | Rypien | Belak

1. Bruins win Stanley Cup -- If he didn't already have the designation by all before, Tim Thomas certainly earned it in the playoffs. He is the best goalie in the world.

Thomas pretty much put the Bruins on his shoulders and carried them past the Vancouver Canucks in a great seven-game series that led to the Bruins hoisting their first Stanley Cup in 39 years. Of course Thomas topped it off with a shutout in Game 7 and took home the Conn Smythe as the playoff MVP, an incredibly well-deserved award.

But in addition to Thomas, it was one heck of a series. The first six games were won by the home team. We had one game ending a few seconds into overtime. Who can forget the man that scored that goal, Alex Burrows, was caught biting Patrice Bergeron in a scrum and the resulting taunts at Burrows from the Bruins later on.

There was Nathan Horton getting leveled and concussed in Boston in a moment that some feel changed the series. The Bruins responded to that by running the Canucks out of their building in Games 3 and 4. Horton made another impression when he was seen pouring TD Garden ice on the rink in Vancouver before Game 7, a superstitious move that will live in Bruins lore.

We had Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo pumping Thomas' tires after critiquing his aggressive style in net. Then of course item No. 6 on this list, the post-series riot in Vancouver.

The series was about as memorable as it gets. The ratings were as good as they have been in decades, too. And the Bruins' post-championship romp back in New England became a legend with a reported $156,679.74 bar tab that included one Amstel Light. It kicked off a great summer tour with the Cup for the Bruins, Michael Ryder's Cup mishap included.

There is no disputing the Bruins earned the right to lift Lord Stanley's Cup after one great Final.

Look back: Bruins win Stanley Cup

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.


Posted on: November 1, 2011 3:23 pm
 

Tim Thomas, Patrick Kane star in credit card ads

By Brian Stubits

When you think of running commercial ad campaigns, it's a painful process to think of good ones. Think of how awful that Taco Bell dog was. In my mind, none are worse than the Progressive Insurance ones featuring Flo that inexplicably are still being played. I've never known of anybody who likes those ads.

But one campaign I haven't found bothersome at all, and in fact still sort of funny? The Discover Card ads with Peggy from USA Prime Credit. Apparently they were so in love with their ad featuring Keeper of the Cup Phil Pritchard that Discover made a pair of new hockey-personality ads.

The first also features a Stanley Cup tie in, meaning it Stars Conn Smythe and Stanley Cup winner Tim Thomas of the Boston Bruins.

Quality commercial, certainly good for a laugh. But I'm left with one question -- well OK, there are more such as why do these people only carry one card, but just one I want to bring up -- what kind of stalker doesn't recognize her obsession when he's right there?

On to the next ...

The second commercial stars Chicago Blackhawks star Patrick Kane. He is not in a taxi cab (fill in the joke here) but instead in a hotel trying to pay the bill.

Kane. Patrick. I love the James Bond name delivery. And the face on the stick hockey players? Good touch.

Not bad, Thomas and Kane. Now to hockey fans with NHL Center Ice at home, be prepared to be sick of these commercials by Thanksgiving. Then hopefully they will begin planning for future shoots. Who should be next?

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: October 27, 2011 11:05 am
 

Horton spreading TD Garden ice across New England

By Brian Stubits

Even though Nathan Horton didn't play a minute in the Boston Bruins' Game 7 win over the Canucks in last year's Stanley Cup Final, he still made his way into Bruins lore with one silly, superstitious little gesture.

Prior to the game, Horton stealthily walked to the bench and dumped some water on the ice. It was, as everybody presumed, water from TD Garden, where the Bruins had dominated the Canucks in each of the three games played in Boston.

Of course, the Bruins went on to win and this little moment became a fun little side story. Who knows, maybe one day this will be seen as a curse in Vancouver if they can't win a Cup.

In the meantime, Horton is continuing the practice, bringing TD Garden ice to rinks all across the Northeast.

My two favorite parts of this video? The first is how Horton dumps the water the same way as he did in Vancouver, squirting it out through the Gatorade bottle before just opening the cap and dumping the rest. It's almost like a religious practice.

Secondly, the simple things like one of the kids at the very end of the video saying "This is so cool!" It's always great to me to see how athletes can so easily give kids a moment they will cherish. Unlike those stupid autograph contracts ...

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 12, 2011 2:36 pm
Edited on: September 12, 2011 4:02 pm
 

Bruins' Savard will get name on Stanley Cup

By Brian Stubits

Here's some welcome good news for Marc Savard, who could possibly have played his last game in the NHL due to concussion issues: he's going to have his name etched into the Stanley Cup after all.

 General manager Peter Chiarelli said Monday at the team's charity golf tournament that Savard's name will be inscribed on the trophy with his teammates.

Savard, who played just 25 games because of post-concussion syndrome, didn't meet the minimum requirement of 41 games played to appear on the Cup, but Chiarelli insisted he would petition the league to have Savard's name added. Apparently he was convincing.

He did get the greatest perk in sports already despite not being on the Cup, getting a day all to himself to spend with the prized trophy.

Chiarelli announced two weeks ago that Savard is unlikely to play at all next season, so he won't be able to help the B's defend the Cup. Moreover, Chiarelli says the team isn't counting on Savard ever playing again.

If the Bruins GM is correct and Savard is finished, he'll go out a champion, and he'll be able to point to the Cup to prove it.

Also Monday, Bruins forward Nathan Horton, who was injured during the Stanley Cup finals against Vancouver, said he is skating again and ready for the start of training camp this week.

Photo: Getty Images

The Associated Press contributed to this report

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 6, 2011 10:43 am
Edited on: September 6, 2011 10:45 am
 

Daily Skate: Ference's Cup day includes flash mob

By Brian Stubits

FLASH IN THE PAN: Andrew Ference recently took his time with the Stanley Cup and had said that his time would one-up everybody else's. Boy did it. In Boston's North End at the celebration, a flash mob busts out dancing and the show ends with a triumphant Ference standing amid the dancers holding the chalice high above his head (h/t to Puck Daddy). No word if this guy made it in the routine (I still love this).

CAN'T CUT IT: The Washington Capitals made a small move on Monday, waiving one-time hot prospect Dmitry Kugryshev (via DC Pro Sports Report), who will soon be on his way to NHL free agency. The Russian prospect had shown tremendous promise in lighting up the QMJHL, tallying 87 points in 66 games his last season there. But life in the AHL was a lot tougher and apparently the Caps have seen enough. You can surely expect some team to try and take a flyer on Kugryshev.

TESTING TIME: A few Carolina Hurricanes are taking part in an experiment from Nike, requiring the players to wear goggles while they train and setting them back in the disco era. From Chip Alexander at the News Observer: "use of the glasses can improve peripheral vision, reaction time, perception and focus. The disco reference? To the strobe effect of the glasses. Ah, the things people do for scienece.

REMEMBERING BELAK: Wade Belak's memorial service was held over the weekend and among those on hand were his former teammates with the Predators to honor the fallen player. “He was happy to be retired," Ryan Suter said. "He was happy to be moving on, because he had played for so long. He was going to finally be able to relax and enjoy it.” Josh Cooper at the Tennesseean has the full story.

IRONWOMEN: In Burnaby, Britich Columbia, a group of women finished playing the longest hockey game in history, going 243 hours and five minutes of consecutive (minus occasional zamboni appearances) of action to break the Guiness world record (via CTV news). The reason? To raise money for cystic fibrosis. The game that stretched 10 days had almost 2,500 goals scored. I guess nobody will complain about hockey being low scoring after that.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: August 30, 2011 12:14 pm
Edited on: August 30, 2011 12:16 pm
 

Cup keep up: Stanley takes a tumble with Ryder

By Brian Stubits

The Stanley Cup is still making its summer rounds with the Bruins organization as each member spends their day with the Cup. Tuesday was Michael Ryder's time and it didn't exactly get off to a good start.

Before taking the greatest trophy in sports on a helicopter ride to his hometown of St. John, Newfoundland, the Cup took another sort of trip. Some combination of a gust of wind and a bad table leg sent the Cup tumbling to the ground. In the background you can hear somebody say "first dent of the day!"

Thankfully for Ryder, he won't be playing in Boston next season after signing with the Stars, so he won't have to hear about it from all his teammates who helped earn the Cup. But there are certainly a lot worse places it could have fallen, including the helicopter ride.

This isn't the first time the Cup has fallen, of course. The thing used to get so beat up they hired the keepers of the Cup just to watch after it. And you thought the job was all glitz and glamour.

All in all, though, the Bruins have done a pretty gob job on their Cup tour this offseason, so it has seemed. Outside of the time when it was the VIP at a special post-title party, Lord Stanley's Cup has been kept out of harm's way for the most part. Well, there was also the case of the missing Cup on Nathan Horton's day, it's been pretty smooth. So it's not bad to take this long for a real bump.

Video from St. John Telegram. Hat tip to Mike Harrington, Puck Daddy.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: August 12, 2011 10:14 am
 

Daily Skate: Lucic Cup day muted; injury updates

By Brian Stubits

LOUSY FOR LUCIC: The Stanley Cup continues to make the rounds among the Bruins, and now it's Milan Lucic's turn. He was the player that had the honor of raising the Cup in his hometown, being met with a mixture of cheers and boos. As we have seen already this summer, a lot of players like to bring the Cup home and share it with the public, but Lucic won't be doing that seeing as how rough some in Vancouver took the Canucks' Finals loss. There was even a party slated for a beach that was scrapped due to fear of hooligans ruining the day. Instead he will have a low-key affair (The Bruins Blog) at his Vancouver home with some family and friends. It's the smart move, but that doesn't make it any less sad to hear.

INJURY ISSUES: When the Maple Leafs traded for Cody Franson and Matthew Lombardi, there was some trepidation considering Lombardi missed almost the entirety of last season after suffering the second concussion of his career. Kevin Allen at USA Today says the Leafs and Lombardi are expecting him to be present when camp begins. Allen also goes on to offer updates on a bunch of other injured players such as David Perron, Sidney Crosby and Jonas Hiller.

REWRITING HISTORY: The Minneapolis Star-Tribune is doing a summer series on a bunch of what-if scenarios in Minnesota sports, the latest being on if the North Stars never left the Land of 10,000 Lakes. Sure, the city would have a championship to boast about in the last 20 years, but it wouldn't have the Wild and the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul. Worth the robbing of the team?

DOUGHTY SPECULATION: The negotiations go on and on and on in the Drew Doughty talks with the Kings, the possibility growing that they will continue well into September. So while we all wait, Red Light District decided to take a gander at what Doughty's contract should be worth, which should put him at the top of the Kings payroll.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: July 25, 2011 10:32 am
Edited on: July 25, 2011 3:13 pm
 

Daily Skate: Jets donate to Air Force; Sir Chara

By Brian Stubits

CO-PILOTS: When the Winnipeg Jets released their long-awaited new logo, it was met with plenty of mixed reactions with a lot of people pointing out how similar the design is to the Canadian Air Force's design. Turns out, that was part of the plan. The CBC shared that the Jets and the Air Force struck a partnership in which the Jets will donate $1 million over 10 years to Air Force family charities.

JUST CALL HIM SIR: Zdeno Chara got not one, but two days with the Stanley Cup when his turn came. Spending the weekend back in his home country of Slovakia, Chara was very busy signing autographs, snapping photos, arm wrestling (where he lies down) and even being knighted. What I want to know is if they could find armor big enough for him to fit in. After visiting the Czech Republic (Thomas Kaberle and David Krejci) Slovakia and Finland (with Tuukka Rask), the Cup comes back to North America for some visits in Ontario.

OH, OVIE: Alex Ovechkin didn't exactly get knighted in his recent trip back to Russia, he was awarded in another way. The Russian Machine Never Breaks has photos of Ovechkin being feted at halftime of a soccer match where he was bestowed with the traditional Dagestani burka and papakha, which is a wool hat. Just take a look at the pictures. Ovechkin looks more like Cher from the 70s than anything else. Nonetheless, it's an honor for the Capitals star.

GETTING OUT THE VOTE: As we have shared, August 1 will be a monumental day in New York Islanders history as that's when the proposal for a new arena goes to the public for vote. If the vote passes, the team will stick on Long Island, if it fails then the relocation talk will get real. Chris Botta of Islanders Point Blank shares what some displaced Islanders fans are doing to contribute to the effort, starting chain emails encouraging people to go out and vote yes.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnhl and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com