Tag:Tomas Plekanec
Posted on: February 16, 2012 12:40 am
Edited on: February 16, 2012 2:22 pm
 

Habs fans cheer Chara being hit by puck

By Brian Stubits

Boston Bruins captain Zdeno Chara just doesn't seem to have a whole lot of luck playing in Montreal.

You don't really need a reminder of what happened last season, but just remember how he checked Max Pacioretty and sent the Canadiens forward into the stanchion, resulting in a broken neck. It got so ugly that Montreal police debated for a long while whether or not to press charges on Chara or not. Eventually the answer was no.

As a result -- and being the Bruins captain -- they aren't fond of Chara in Montreal, the Habs fans aren't. So it shouldn't surprise that the Habs fans at the Bell Centre on Wednesday night experienced a little schadenfreude when Chara took a puck to the face.

It was an errant clearing attempt from Tomas Plekanec that caught Chara up high and left him bloodied. While Plekanec was checking up on Chara, the crowd was releasing some pent-up frustration.

Some are going to call it Montreal Typical of the fans to cheer an injury, no matter the player and trash the Habs fans. I've already seen plenty of it. But it's a bit understandable. Fans take it personally when players are injured on their favorite teams and they feel like the offender got away with it. It doesn't quite sit right with me to cheer an injury, but it's understandable.

Chara did return in the game, but his luck didn't get much better. He made an awfully careless play in his own end that led to Erik Cole's equalizer before the Bruins eventually won in a shootout.

H/t to Backhand Shelf

More from Eye On Hockey

Pacioretty carted off the ice
Chara not charged for hit
Marchand called for clipping Wednesday

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Posted on: October 27, 2011 9:04 pm
Edited on: October 27, 2011 9:06 pm
 

Video: Plekanec scores on his own net

By: Adam Gretz

Bruins forward Patrice Bergeron was credited with a goal during the first period of Boston's home game with Montreal on Thursday night, and he did so without having to touch the puck. How does that happen? Well, like this: The Canadiens, specifically center Tomas Plekanec and goaltender Carey Price, did all of the work for him.

With a faceoff in the defensive zone to the right of Price, Plekanec won the draw against Bergeron, which would have normally been a positive play. Unfortunately, on this occassion, the puck went directly on his own goal -- before Price was ready to play the puck. This is the comical result.



When things are going bad, as they have been in Montreal this season, those are the kind of breaks that seem to always be going against you.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: October 9, 2011 7:57 pm
Edited on: October 9, 2011 9:07 pm
 

Jets loss can't dampen party mood in Winnipeg

By Brian Stubits

Hockey is back in Winnipeg. On Sunday, that's all that mattered as the Jets were outworked and beaten by the Montreal Canadiens 5-1 in their first official game as the Jets since 1996.

But that's hardly enough to damped the mood in the 'Peg. For now it's still the honeymoon. But when the joy of the pregame celebrations wore off, it was clear that this is still the Thrashers team that only made the playoffs once in franchise history. There will be more growing pains. But these will be the most pleasant pains I think any fan base has ever gone through.

The game was particularly tough on Jets defenseman Johnny Oduya. There's no doubt that he gets the status as the goat for the first game back in Manitoba. He turned the puck over not once but twice in his own defensive zone, leading to the Habs' first two goals of the night.

More on Canadiens-Jets

Again, though, that was an afterthought. The Canadiens could have won 17-1, the fans would have loved every second of it. The place got especially buzzing after Nik Antropov put himself in Winnipeg lore by scoring the first goal for the "new" Jets. For a minutes after, it was as good as it got all game. The Jets were buzzing, the electricity was back in the building and hit a high after Winnipeg's Mark Stuart lit up Canadiens captain Brian Gionta.

On Thanksgiving weekend in Canada, there were plenty of thanks being given. Get this: Commissioner Gary Bettman, who once ripped a franchise away from the 'Peg and shipped it to Phoenix, wasn't even booed.

"It wasn't personal then and while frankly I'm happy to have been a part of the equation that restored the team, the credit goes to the people in Winnipeg without whom this wouldn't be happening," Bettman said.

They were raucous before the game began. The only thing that could quiet the crowd was a touching tribute to the late Rick Rypien, who played with the Manitoba Moose and signed with the Jets in the offseason before committing suicide this summer. His mother came onto the ice to drop the ceremonial first puck. The emotion was oozing from the arena.

After that it was mostly all joy. However you couldn't help but feel for the fans back in Atlanta.

That, of course, is the byproduct here, that fans of the Thrashers -- and there were fans of the Thrashers -- are left in the dark. If they had the stomach to watch the game, it had to be gut-wrenching. Jets fans know the feeling, though, and can empathize. It's just that now that's over, and "Go Jets Go" chants fill the arena once again.

They were so appreciative in Winnipeg for this game and the return of hockey, every soul stayed in their seats and gave a standing ovation for the final minute. Of a 5-1 loss.

The official three Stars of the night were listed as Tomas Plekanec, Carey Price and Antropov. But if you polled everybody in the arena on Sunday, the obvious answer for the first star is Mark Chipman, the man most responsible for bringing the NHL back to Winnipeg.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: August 10, 2011 10:11 pm
Edited on: August 10, 2011 10:27 pm
 

Can Jagr be top scoring Czech player in NHL?

JagrBy: Adam Gretz

It's been over 10 years since the Czech Republic was one of the top hockey powers on the planet, winning Gold at the 1998 Winter Olympics and boasting an impressive list of NHL players. Over the years their numbers across the NHL have dropped significantly. Last season there were just 42 players from the Czech Republic to appear in the NHL, down from their peak of 78 during the 2001-02 season.

Perhaps the best Czech player ever, Jaromir Jagr, (I say perhaps because you can make an argument for Dominik Hasek in that discussion) will be returning to the NHL this season as a member of the Philadelphia Flyers after spending the past three seasons playing in Russia. And also after what was a highly entertaining and, at the same time, maddening free agency courtship earlier this summer.

Between 1997 and 2008, which was Jagr's last year in the NHL, he was the top scoring player from the Czech Republic in the NHL in eight of those seasons, and the two years he wasn't (2002-03 and 2003-04, also two of the worst seasons of his career) he finished third and fourth respectively.

Can he return to the top of the list in 2011 after a three-year stop in the KHL?

The top-scoring Czech player last season was a three-way tie between Martin Havlat, David Krejci and Patrik Elias with 62 points, and 2009-10 it was Tomas Plekanec with 70. In Jagr's last NHL appearance three years ago he scored 71 with the Rangers, which led the team .

I guess the question becomes whether or not Jagr can still be a 60-70 point player at the age of 39. During his stay in the KHL he was nearly a point-per-game player over the three-year stretch, and finished in the top-10 in scoring twice, including this past season. It's obviously a different style of play on a different playing surface and in what seems to be lower-scoring league, so it's not exactly easy to see how the production would translate.

We've seen elite players like Teemu Selanne and Nicklas Lidstrom continue to put up huge numbers in the NHL at the age of 39 and beyond (Selanne, for example, recorded 80 points last season as a 40-year-old), and Jagr was certainly an elite player during his time in the NHL. And even though he wasn't in the league the past three years, he was still playing hockey in what is probably the second-best league in the world. He also showed he can still play against a high level of competition during the 2010 Olympics, as well as the most recent World Championships.

This season he's going to have a chance to be one of the top offensive weapons (along with Claude Giroux and youngsters like James vanRiemsdyk) on a retooled Flyers team that should still score its share of goals, even if they don't look anywhere near as dangerous -- on paper, anyway -- as they did before trading Mike Richards and Jeff Carter.

It's a bit of a mystery for sure, and it's hard to figure out what to expect. He's certainly not as explosive or fast as he was during his prime, but it's hard to believe his hands and offensive skill have deteriorated to the point that he won't still able to put in between 50 and 60 points, and perhaps more, assuming he stays injury free.

Photo: Getty Images

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