Tag:Brendan Shanahan
Posted on: September 22, 2011 10:53 am
Edited on: September 26, 2011 7:33 pm
 

Shelley's hard hit on Boyce to test Shanahan

By Brian Stubits

It didn't take long for us to get a test case for new discipline chief Brendan Shanahan.

Last night in Philadelphia, Jody Shelley laid an ugly hit on the Maple Leafs' Darryl Boyce into the boards, receiving a major penalty, game misconduct and cut over his eye from a Jay Rosehill punch. See the play and ensuing fight for yourself.

This comes on the heels of Shanahan sending out changes to the boarding rules to all the teams. In particular, here is what it had to say that's in play here.

This season, a boarding penalty will be assessed to a player who checks or pushes a defenseless player in a manner that causes the player to have a potentially violent and/or dangerous impact with the boards. The word "pushes" was added to the rule and "defenseless" replaced the word "vulnerable."
The onus now is going to be on the player applying the check to ensure his opponent is not in a defenseless position. If he is, the player applying the hit must avoid or, at the very least, minimize the contact.

After the game Boyce talked about the hit, sporting a freshly broken nose.

“I think it was late for sure and my back was to the wall, so it definitely was not a clean hit,” Boyce said. “The game moves so fast out there that sometimes you think that it wasn’t late and it was clean. That’s just the speed of the game.”

Clearly Shelley is looking at some punishment from the league. The puck was long gone from Boyce's stick and the hit seems to fit the type of play the league is trying to rid to a T. Considering Shelley doesn't have the cleanest track record, I would expect to see Shelley sit out the remainder of the preseason, at least, and have to pay a fine.

In addition to being a perfect opportunity for Shanahan to show how serious he is about eradicating these hits from the game, it's an equally good chance to help clarify the rules. They have been changing so much in recent years that nobody really knows what it legal and what's not these days.

Your move, Shanny.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.


Posted on: September 20, 2011 11:27 am
 

NHL changes rules on hits to head, boarding

By Brian Stubits

Brendan Shanahan is now in control of the NHL's disciplinary actions in the NHL offices. Along with that comes the implementation/tweaking of rules, and he introduced a couple new items to teams with videos sent to preseason camps.

The rule changes come as no surprise to anybody as they are an attempt to help take out the dangerous hits from hockey, something the NHL has been working on for a few years.

The first rule specifically addresses hits to the head and tries to clarify the rule, make it simpler for the players to follow. Much like the NFL with their hits on defenseless receivers and to the head, there has been plenty of gray area as to what's legal and what's not.

Here's what the league posted on it's official website.

The NHL changed Rule 48 to render illegal all hits where the head is targeted in an intentional and/or reckless way and is the principal point of contact. A minor penalty will be assessed for infractions of this rule and the possibility of supplementary discipline exists.
The referee can use his judgment to determine if the player put himself in a vulnerable position immediately prior to or simultaneous with being hit, as well as if the contact with the head on an otherwise legal body check was avoidable.
"Now, the confusion some of the players have expressed in the past as to what direction they're approaching a player, what direction a player is facing, east, west, north, south, that has all been taken out," Shanahan said. "Anywhere on the ice, coming from any direction, you target the head and make it a principal point of contact, you'll be subject to a two-minute penalty. You'll also be -- as with all two-minute penalties or non-calls -- subject to supplementary discipline."

That does help remove the question marks. Defining it as straight as the head being the principal point of contact is pretty clear.

The other rule that Shanahan and Co. made some changes to are in boarding.

The boarding rule was amended in several ways in order to put the focus on the violent -- and possibly dangerous -- contact with the boards rather than the actual point of contact.
This season, a boarding penalty will be assessed to a player who checks or pushes a defenseless player in a manner that causes the player to have a potentially violent and/or dangerous impact with the boards. The word "pushes" was added to the rule and "defenseless" replaced the word "vulnerable."
The onus now is going to be on the player applying the check to ensure his opponent is not in a defenseless position. If he is, the player applying the hit must avoid or, at the very least, minimize the contact.
"What we did is we took the onus off the violence of the hit itself and added the word 'push' in there," Shanahan said. "It really has more to do with the violence in the collision with the boards. We don't necessarily think it has to be a violent hit to cause a violent crash, so we broadened the rule by putting in the word 'push.'"

These are all a work in progress. But the goal of eliminating the career-threatening hits that we've seen in the NHL is one they will continue to work toward while keeping the integrity of the game and a transparency for the players.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: August 17, 2011 10:01 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 10:09 pm
 

New OT, short-handed rules talk of RDO Camp Day 1

By Brian Stubits

Day 1 of the NHL Research and Development Camp, or Camp Shanny as everybody likes to call it, is in the books. It's a time testing, tweaking and experimentation while general managers also get an up-close look at some of next year's draft prospects -- where GMs came away impressed with the defensemen.

Brendan Shanahan, getting settled into his new role as the NHL's next master disciplinarian, is running the show again this year as the league tries out a few ideas, some that will hit, some that will miss.

"This is research and development, it's what many companies do, what many corporations do," Shanahan said after the session. "It's what we do. It's not a knee-jerk reaction to anything we feel is wrong with the game.

"One of the things, maybe a misconception, was that we had to go out and test 30 new things. Quite honestly there were about 20 things that were repeating because we needed to get more information, more data. We love the way the game is being played by our players. We think the game is an entertaining game for the fans and we think it's a great time to study it. If for any reason, a year, two years, three years, four years down the road we see some trend that we don't like, we're going to have many of information to back it up."

Perhaps the most talked-about testing item after the first day was the suggestion to the overtime rules. It's no secret that the shootout debate has divided fans, with many feeling it ruins the game while others enjoy games having a clear winner and loser. To try and alleviate the argument of shootouts, one proposal is to lengthen overtime to seven minutes, going to 3-on-3 after four minutes.

"A couple of years ago we thought too many games were being undecided in overtime," Shanahan said. "Without changing many of the rules, that seemed to straighten itself out last year. This isn't about any sort of knee-jerk reaction, this is about being pro-active."

"I think it's certainly interesting to get to the 3-on-3," Blues GM Doug Armstrong told NHL.com. "I think if we want less games ending in the shootout, it's certainly an avenue we should explore, going right to the 3-on-3 and eliminate the 4-on-4."

But Lightning GM Steve Yzerman was singing a different tune.

"I prefer 4-on-4," Yzerman told NHL.com. "I'd like to keep 4-on-4. If we're going to extend it, keep it at 4-on-4. Three-on-three is not enough players on the ice, in my opinion."

The other big-discussion piece involved the removal of icing during man-down situations. Penguins coach Dan Bylsma, on the bench, decided to take that as an opportunity to explore.

Knowing the other team couldn't launch the puck the length of the ice, he pulled his own goalie to create a 6-on-4 situation. I can't imagine you would see that during the season (unless it's late in the game) as the danger of the opposing team getting the puck out of the zone is at least slim. But in Camp Shanny? Why not?

Wouldn't you know it, Bylsma's team did surrender a goal at that time when a player fell down, allowing the other squad, coached by Phoenix Coyotes head man Dave Tippett, to score.

"I was really interested in this session that when a team is short-handed they can't ice the puck," Shanahan said. "I'd like to see more of that ... the coaches were curious about and wanted to play around with. That was a good one."

This is one of the proposed rules I am not a big fan of. I understand the concept of the penalty being something a team should suffer for, but I think it handicaps them too much. I would expect power play numbers to increase significantly and my feeling it's too strong of a change. But that's why they test it.

Finally, one of the other items under examination is the reduced goal and the use of a green line to detect if the puck completely crossed the goal line. Dan Craig takes a closer look at the smaller net in this video.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: June 1, 2011 1:08 pm
Edited on: June 1, 2011 3:06 pm
 

Report: Campbell out as NHL sheriff; Shanahan in?

It looks like there's going to be a new sheriff in town.

NHL Senior Vice President and chief disciplinarian Colin Campbell will relinquish his duties in the crime and punishment department, leaving the door open for Brendan Shanahan's role in the NHL offices to further grow and for him to take over, Darren Dreger of TSN reported Wednesday.

Campbell has held the role in the NHL offices since he was fired as coach of the New York Rangers in 1998. In his time, he's been a busy -- and controversial -- man. Let's face it, being in charge of fines and suspensions in the NHL is no piece of cake. In recent years he's really been under the microscope with the increased attention on hits to the head.

Then there was the big mess Campbell found himself in back in November of last year. Emails came to the surface that Campbell had sent, accusing Boston's Marc Savard of being "a little faker" after he drew a penalty from Campbell's son, Gregory, in a game. Ironically, Savard and the younger Campbell are now together with the Bruins, who are playing for the Stanley Cup.

Shanahan, meanwhile, has become a recognized rising star since joining the NHL in the role of Vice President of Hockey and Business Development.

-- Brian Stubits

Category: NHL
 
 
 
 
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