Tag:David Krejci
Posted on: October 12, 2011 10:12 am
Edited on: October 12, 2011 12:17 pm
 

Report: B's Krejci day to day with 'core' issue

By Brian Stubits

Uh oh, Boston. David Krejci will not play when the Bruins take on the Carolina Hurricanes on Wednesday night after going down in practice on Tuesday with what the team described as a "core injury."

Originally, Joe Haggerty of CSN New Enland reported that Krejci went down in a non-contact injury and was looking at a problem with his knee. In Haggerty's words, the best case scenario -- best case! -- was that he's out for a couple of weeks with a knee sprain. You can probably figure out the worst case scenario, but I imagine it would have three little letters.

But coach Claude Julien said that instead it's a core issue and Krejci is day to day. That's a minor crisis averted.

These are the exact types of perils that just seem to await teams after winning a Stanley Cup. As if starting slow out of the gate (two points, five goals in three games) wasn't enough, now the B's will be without their co-leading scorer from last season and top-line center as they try and wake up. Krejci was especially effective in the playoffs when he had 12 goals -- one shy of his regular-season total of 13 -- and 11 assists.

As a result, it looks like the Bruins will have to call on the kid -- Tyler Seguin -- to man the top center spot for the time being. It was only 20 games or so ago that Seguin was a healthy scratch and now he'll get a shot to play between Nathan Horton and Milan Lucic.

We know this much, he'll add some speed that can maybe jumpstart Boston's scorers. Because while the rest of the team might be hung over from the summer celebrations, we know Seguin isn't since he's under the American legal drinking age. (Ummmm, just play along.)

Or it could just be as simple as what Shawn Thornton thinks: The Bruins aren't playing hard enough.

Back to the issue at hand: They could also put Patrice Bergeron up on the first line and leave Seguin to center another group. Or Claude Julien could pull any other number of changes he fancies. Either way, it seems like the No. 2 overall draft pick in the summer of 2010 is going to get his shot and play in the middle.

With Buffalo in the division off to a great start and the Eastern Conference looking better as a whole, the Bruins can't really afford to take too much time getting going. As their local counterparts in baseball showed, poor starts to the season can haunt you in the end (and poor finishes).

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: October 11, 2011 12:43 pm
 

Bruins ink speedster Rich Peverley to 3-year deal

By Brian Stubits

The Bruins have a lot of players to try and re-sign before next season, so GM Peter Chiarelli got started early with Rich Peverley. The B's inked the 29-year-old forward to a three-year contract on Tuesday, giving him a healthy raise to #3.25 million annually.

Peverley, set to become an unrestricted free agent after this season, will make $1.325 million this season before the new deal kicks in.

Peverley was acquired by the Bruins before the trade deadline last season in a deal with Atlanta/Winnipeg. along with Boris Valabik for Blake Wheeler and Mark Stuart. In 23 games with Boston, he had four goals and three assists. He picks up the numbers a little in the postseason when he had four goals and eight assists in 25 games. This season he is off to a nice start, scoring two goals in the first three games for Boston.

Chiarelli had a nice luxury last offseason, being able to largely sit back and enjoy his team's championship. There was little to do with almost every under contract except re-sign Brad Marchand. Next summer will be a different story though as David Krejci, Chris Kelly, Gregory Campbell, Benoit Pouliot, Daniel Paille, Shawn Thornton, Joe Corvo, Johnny Boychuk and Tuukka Rask all are in the final years of their contracts.

Peverley has proven to be a quality addition to Boston's second line. He brings a lot of speed to a team that could benefit from some. That has helped him to establish himself as a guy capable of routinely putting up 20 goals per season or more. His career high was 22 with the Thrashers.

It's a nice deal for Peverley, who is getting a raise he deserves and is probably the biggest unrestricted free agent the Bruins have.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: October 6, 2011 12:55 am
Edited on: October 6, 2011 1:38 pm
 

Boston will be first team to repeat in 14 years

ZC1

By: Adam Gretz

Recent history suggests it's a terrible, pointless idea to pick the defending Stanley Cup champions to repeat. It hasn't been done since 1997-98 when the Detroit Red Wings swept the Washington Capitals, and only three times since then has a defending champion even managed to return to the finals (the Dallas Stars in 2000, the New Jersey Devils in 2001 and the Red Wings in 2009).

Winning the cup one time is hard enough. But to come back following a shortened offseason, after going through a grueling 82-game regular season and four best-of-seven playoff series just to do it all over again has to take a tremendous toll on the body.

Despite all of that, I'm still picking the Bruins to repeat anyway.

2011-12 NHL Season Preview
They have a great 1-2 punch in net, balanced scoring depth through all four lines and one of the best defenseman in the NHL. What's not to like about their chances to repeat?

Three reasons to like the Bruins:

1) Tim Thomas and Tuukka Rask: You can probably count on one hand -- and have fingers remaining -- the number of goalies in the league that are capable of carrying a team all the way to the Stanley Cup, and Boston has one of them in Tim Thomas. A former ninth-round pick that had to bounce around the minor leagues and Europe before finally getting his shot in the NHL, Thomas has become the best goaltender in the league and won two of the past three Vezina Trophies, leading the league in save percentage each year, and is one of the few true game-changers at his position. His margin of victory in the save percentage race last season (.008 points) was the largest in the NHL in over 12 years.

If Thomas isn't enough, his backup, Tuukka Rask, has proven that he's capable of being a No. 1 goaltender as well, and sandwiched between Thomas' two Vezina seasons he ended up getting the starting job in Boston and had the best save percentage in the NHL himself. That, of course, means the Bruins have had the goaltender with the top save percentage in the league three years running. There's not many teams that can say that.

2) Depth down the middle: Unfortunately, Marc Savard's career appears to be in jeopardy due to his ongoing concussion problems, but even without him the Bruins boast impressive depth down the middle with Patrice Bergeron and David Krejci leading the way. They may not put up huge numbers offensively, but they're excellent two-way players that can control the puck and shut down whoever is on the ice against them.

Bergeron finished fourth in Selke Trophy voting last season and is my pick to win it this year.

The Bruins may not have had a single player finish higher than 40th in the NHL scoring race last year, but they still managed to finish fifth as a team in goals scored due to their depth, and even with the losses of Michael Ryder and Mark Recchi this offseason, they're still able to go four lines deep.

3) Zdeno Chara: Of course, any time you have one of the best defenseman in the NHL it's always a boost to your chances, and Chara has become a regular in the yearly discussion for the Norris Trophy thanks to his ability to match up with the other teams top line and also provide offense from the blue line with his booming slap shot. Along with Chara, Dennis Seidenberg is an underrated player on the blue line that is a fearless shot-blocker and can also provide some offense. There's not a ton of depth on the blue line after that, but Chara and Seidenberg are a pair of workhorses that can carry the load, and when you combine their goaltending with the relentless defensive play of their forwards they should able to overcome whatever shortcomings their bottom two defensive pairings might have.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Posted on: August 10, 2011 10:11 pm
Edited on: August 10, 2011 10:27 pm
 

Can Jagr be top scoring Czech player in NHL?

JagrBy: Adam Gretz

It's been over 10 years since the Czech Republic was one of the top hockey powers on the planet, winning Gold at the 1998 Winter Olympics and boasting an impressive list of NHL players. Over the years their numbers across the NHL have dropped significantly. Last season there were just 42 players from the Czech Republic to appear in the NHL, down from their peak of 78 during the 2001-02 season.

Perhaps the best Czech player ever, Jaromir Jagr, (I say perhaps because you can make an argument for Dominik Hasek in that discussion) will be returning to the NHL this season as a member of the Philadelphia Flyers after spending the past three seasons playing in Russia. And also after what was a highly entertaining and, at the same time, maddening free agency courtship earlier this summer.

Between 1997 and 2008, which was Jagr's last year in the NHL, he was the top scoring player from the Czech Republic in the NHL in eight of those seasons, and the two years he wasn't (2002-03 and 2003-04, also two of the worst seasons of his career) he finished third and fourth respectively.

Can he return to the top of the list in 2011 after a three-year stop in the KHL?

The top-scoring Czech player last season was a three-way tie between Martin Havlat, David Krejci and Patrik Elias with 62 points, and 2009-10 it was Tomas Plekanec with 70. In Jagr's last NHL appearance three years ago he scored 71 with the Rangers, which led the team .

I guess the question becomes whether or not Jagr can still be a 60-70 point player at the age of 39. During his stay in the KHL he was nearly a point-per-game player over the three-year stretch, and finished in the top-10 in scoring twice, including this past season. It's obviously a different style of play on a different playing surface and in what seems to be lower-scoring league, so it's not exactly easy to see how the production would translate.

We've seen elite players like Teemu Selanne and Nicklas Lidstrom continue to put up huge numbers in the NHL at the age of 39 and beyond (Selanne, for example, recorded 80 points last season as a 40-year-old), and Jagr was certainly an elite player during his time in the NHL. And even though he wasn't in the league the past three years, he was still playing hockey in what is probably the second-best league in the world. He also showed he can still play against a high level of competition during the 2010 Olympics, as well as the most recent World Championships.

This season he's going to have a chance to be one of the top offensive weapons (along with Claude Giroux and youngsters like James vanRiemsdyk) on a retooled Flyers team that should still score its share of goals, even if they don't look anywhere near as dangerous -- on paper, anyway -- as they did before trading Mike Richards and Jeff Carter.

It's a bit of a mystery for sure, and it's hard to figure out what to expect. He's certainly not as explosive or fast as he was during his prime, but it's hard to believe his hands and offensive skill have deteriorated to the point that he won't still able to put in between 50 and 60 points, and perhaps more, assuming he stays injury free.

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com