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Tag:Tyler Seguin
Posted on: October 12, 2011 10:12 am
Edited on: October 12, 2011 12:17 pm
 

Report: B's Krejci day to day with 'core' issue

By Brian Stubits

Uh oh, Boston. David Krejci will not play when the Bruins take on the Carolina Hurricanes on Wednesday night after going down in practice on Tuesday with what the team described as a "core injury."

Originally, Joe Haggerty of CSN New Enland reported that Krejci went down in a non-contact injury and was looking at a problem with his knee. In Haggerty's words, the best case scenario -- best case! -- was that he's out for a couple of weeks with a knee sprain. You can probably figure out the worst case scenario, but I imagine it would have three little letters.

But coach Claude Julien said that instead it's a core issue and Krejci is day to day. That's a minor crisis averted.

These are the exact types of perils that just seem to await teams after winning a Stanley Cup. As if starting slow out of the gate (two points, five goals in three games) wasn't enough, now the B's will be without their co-leading scorer from last season and top-line center as they try and wake up. Krejci was especially effective in the playoffs when he had 12 goals -- one shy of his regular-season total of 13 -- and 11 assists.

As a result, it looks like the Bruins will have to call on the kid -- Tyler Seguin -- to man the top center spot for the time being. It was only 20 games or so ago that Seguin was a healthy scratch and now he'll get a shot to play between Nathan Horton and Milan Lucic.

We know this much, he'll add some speed that can maybe jumpstart Boston's scorers. Because while the rest of the team might be hung over from the summer celebrations, we know Seguin isn't since he's under the American legal drinking age. (Ummmm, just play along.)

Or it could just be as simple as what Shawn Thornton thinks: The Bruins aren't playing hard enough.

Back to the issue at hand: They could also put Patrice Bergeron up on the first line and leave Seguin to center another group. Or Claude Julien could pull any other number of changes he fancies. Either way, it seems like the No. 2 overall draft pick in the summer of 2010 is going to get his shot and play in the middle.

With Buffalo in the division off to a great start and the Eastern Conference looking better as a whole, the Bruins can't really afford to take too much time getting going. As their local counterparts in baseball showed, poor starts to the season can haunt you in the end (and poor finishes).

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 21, 2011 12:05 pm
Edited on: September 21, 2011 12:11 pm
 

Step-back players: Can Columbus' Wiz keep it up?

By Brian Stubits

We see it over and over again in sports. Player has a career year, player gets a fat new contract with new team, said player fails to live up to the new deal.

After an offseason of numerous exorbitant contracts, this description will likely apply to plenty of players this upcoming year. That includes the guy who received the biggest bounty on the first day of free agency, James Wisniewski.

Signed by the Columbus Blue Jackets for a robust six-year, $33 million, Wisniewski is the second-highest paid player on an annual basis on a team that includes Rick Nash and Jeff Carter. That's a lot of coin for a player who has one season on his resume worthy of such. In his defense it was last season, so he picked a good time for his best season.

But surely you can see the red flags here. Wisniewski would appear to be a prime target for a step-back season. Now it's possible that last season was the Wiz actually stepping into his prime, after all he is 27 years old now, the magical age in all sports. But when a guy scores 21 more points in a season higher than his previous career high, it is only fair to wonder if it can be repeated. Such a jump indicates likelihood to regress to the mean a little bit.

Throw in the fact that Wisniewski is coming to a new environment, joining players he has never played with before and in an organization that has not had much success to talk about and you have the making for much quieter year.

What could help Wisniewski replicate his 51 points from a season ago with the Canadiens would be getting a lot of ice time, especially on the power play, with Rick Nash and Jeff Carter. Depending on how quickly they jell up front could impact Wisniewski's play and numbers. He'll certainly share the ice with the two high- scoring forwards a bit, but the more (probably) the better.

Now is as good a time as any to explain the rationale here, because it always gets misunderstood. This is no way to say that Wisniewski or any of the other players below will have bad years. That isn't the object one bit. It's simply players who might see a regression. Think of it this way: If a player is great and he regresses, he can still be very good. That fit Alexander Ovechkin last season, despite still being one of the best players in the league, it can't be argued he didn't have as strong a season last year. Now, on to the ...

Step-back candidates

Michael Grabner/Taylor Hall/Logan Couture/Jeff Skinner/Tyler Seguin/Brad Marchand: We're just throwing all of last season's top rookies into one category and labeling this one the "sophomore slump" group. Chances are one of them won't continue to blossom or match their rookie outputs. If I had to pick one, it would be Grabner of the Islanders.

Teemu Selanne, Ducks: The guy is a wonder, recording more than a point per game last season with the Ducks at 40 years old. But his offseason knee surgery and subsequent wait to see if he'd be ready to go (and advanced age) would seem to indicate a player who doesn't seem likely to keep up his pace. Just playing the odds on this one. Then again, we are talking about Selanne here.


Danny Briere, Flyers: Somebody is likely going to suffer a setback in Philadelphia with the absence of Jeff Carter and Mike Richards, and Briere would be my best guess. He posted 34 goals and 34 assists last season, his highest point total in since 2007-08 and he's no spring chicken any more as he will turn 34 years old on the Flyers' opening day.


Christian Ehrhoff, Sabres: He is coming off a season where he posted 14 goals and 36 assists along with a plus-19. That in and of itself is tough to repeat. My colleague Adam Gretz wrote about the prospect of replacing Ehrhoff in Vancouver, noting that he was a bit protected. Now he will still be surrounded by a very good team in Buffalo, but it's looking like he will be paired with Jordan Leopold, the second defensive pairing behind Tyler Myers and Robyn Regehr. It's going to be very tough to replicate his excellent last two seasons.


Michal Neuvirth, Capitals: This is the gamble the Caps are taking by bringing in Tomas Vokoun. Neuvirth was very solid last season, posting a 27-12-4 record with a 2.45 GAA and .914 save percentage. They are risking him taking a step back in his growth as a player by relegating him to backup minutes, not to mention the possibility of a hit to the psyche of bringing in another goaltender and naming him the starter soon after the acquisition.


Sean Bergenheim, Panthers: He had the best season of his career with the Lightning a season ago, scoring 14 goals and 15 assists through 80 regular-season games. Where he drew plenty of attention for himself, though, was in the playoffs when he had nine goals for the Bolts. Coming up with the Islanders there had been plenty of hope and potential for Bergenheim, so perhaps he's just starting to break out. I'm expecting a point total in the low 20s, like his numbers in the days on the Island.


NHL season preview schedule
Wed., Sept. 21: Step-back players Tues., Sept. 27: Atlantic Division
Thur., Sept. 22: Breakout players Wed., Sept. 28: Central Division
Fri., Sept. 23: Southeast Division Thur. Sept. 29: Northeast Division
Mon., Sept. 26: Pacific Division Fri., Sept. 30: Northwest Division

Photo: Getty Images

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: September 20, 2011 9:52 am
Edited on: September 20, 2011 12:08 pm
 

Daily Skate: Second Stars suitor; Sid's bodyguard

By Brian Stubits

INTEREST IN BIG D: The Stars sale is actually moving along, with the team agreeing last week to sell the team to Vancouver businessman Tom Gagliardi. Now, enter former Texas Rangers owner Chuck Greenberg and we might actually have a bidding war for the debt-ridden franchise on our hands. (Biz Journal)

SID'S BODYGUARD: There is a new enforcer in Pittsburgh, and he knows exactly what he is supposed to do. Steve MacIntyre, one of the game's most feared, says "My job is to make sure [Sidney Crosby's] transition back to hockey goes smoothly." (Pittsburgh Tribune- Review)

BROTHERLY LOVE: Rangers defenseman Marc Staal is struggling with post-concussion symptoms and is sitting out the first three preseason games for precautionary reasons. He seems to be OK, but that isn't helping the man who caused the concussion, his own brother Eric Staal with the Hurricanes, to feel better. (News Observer)

PLAYING THE GOAT: Todd Bertuzzi has a new role this season with the Red Wings, dropping down to the more defensive-minded third line. There he joins Darren Helm and Justin Abdelkader, resulting in one of the better line names: the Two Kids and a Goat line. For Bertuzzi, it's a whole new world. (Detroit Free Press)

SOPHOMORE STEP UP: In the playoffs, the Bruins had to turn to rookie Tyler Seguin in the playoffs after Nathan Horton's injury sidelined him. The former No. 2 pick responded immediately but then went quiet. After an offseason of heavy work, the B's might be ready to count on Seguin more. (Boston Herald)

SUPER HUBER: The Florida Panthers' No. 3 pick in this summer's draft isn't likely to make the team as a rookie. But he's doing all he can to make the roster instead of going back to the junior level, scoring a goal and an assist in the Panthers' doubleheader game against the Predators on Monday. (Sun- Sentinel)

READY FOR MORE: Shea Weber took the role of captain last season and the Predators went further than they ever have before in the postseason. Now, armed with a huge new contract for this season, he's excited about Year 2 wearing the C having learned a lot already. (Hockey Night in Nashville)

HOCKEY CRAZE: Throw this under less-than surprising tid-bits: sports fans in Toronto chose the Maple Leafs' first preseason game over one of the Blue Jays' final home games of the season. More than 18,000 showed up to see the Leafs while just over 11,000 were on hand to see the Jays. (The Canadian Press)

CAPS GM DEFENDS SEMIN: Washington Capitals general manager took his chance to defend forward Alexander Semin after he took heat this summer from former teammate Matt Bradley, saying Semin is just a quiet kid and Bradley regrets having said it. You can watch the whole interview on NHL Live! below.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: June 21, 2011 2:54 pm
Edited on: June 21, 2011 5:45 pm
 

Cup keep up: Bruins rack up one massive bar tab

$156,679.74.

That is the bar tab the Bruins racked up the night of their Stanley Cup parade in Boston. After being feted in the streets of Beantown, the team trekked to Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut and Shrine nightclub where they partied like a franchise that hadn't won the Stanley Cup in 39 years. Oh, that's right ...

I know alcohol is expensive, but how do you rack up a bill that big and not have half the roster getting alcohol poisoning? It's pretty easy; just buy a $100,000 bottle of champagne. The 30-liter bottle -- one of only six in existence -- was twice the size of the bottle the NBA's Mavericks famously got for their club celebration. It was so big, even Zdeno Chara had a hard time opening it. Afterward, the B's all signed the bottle and it will eventually be raffled off with benefits going to the Bruins foundation.

And how exactly does one drink from a bottle that big? Pour it into the Stanley Cup, of course. It's times like this I actually don't envy the Keeper of the Cup. I'd rather have a problem with my credit card than clean that.

In case you were wondering, the tip on a bill like that comes out to $24,869.80 ... as a mandatory gratuity. Danielle (the server's name on the receipt) and staff probably took home more than that. Plus, there's the $7,500 in taxes, too. Can't forget the 136 bottles of Bud Light and all the water.

You can see the whole bill here (courtesy of Boston Globe).

How the players were standing and not hung over -- or at least appearing so -- on Sunday afternoon when they all threw out the first pitch at Fenway Park is amazing. If it were me, I'd probably still have a headache.

-- Brian Stubits

Video courtesy of Boston Globe

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnhl on Twitter

Posted on: June 8, 2011 1:20 pm
Edited on: June 8, 2011 8:19 pm
 

Replacing Horton's production no easy task

BOSTON --- Rookie Tyler Seguin replaced injured Nathan Horton in the lineup for Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Final on Wednesday night, but Boston Bruins coach Claude Julien said it’s not easy to supplant the lost production

“It's going to take everybody to play well again, not just because Nathan is out of our lineup,” Julien said. ‘That's what it's going to take to beat this team. We've known that from the start.”

Seven different Bruins scored in Monday’s 8-1 victory and all the goals were tallied after Horton was knocked from the game --- and the series --- with a severe concussion early in the first period after a check from Vancouver defenseman Aaron Rome. Horton is tied for the second-most playoff points (17) among the Bruins.

“Obviously, you can’t replace a guy like Horts,” Seguin said “Everyone just has to step up, just like when Bergy [Patrice Bergeron] was out. All the guys had to step up even more and that’s just what everyone is going to ask out of each other for tonight’s game.”

Seguin, 19, first cracked the Bruins' postseason lineup in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals against the Tampa Bay Lightning as Bergeron recovered from a concussion. Seguin scored six points (three goals, three assists) in the first two games of that series, but has failed to net a point since. Shawn Thornton replaced Seguin in the lineup for Monday’s game.

Seguin said he tried to absorb as much from coaches and others as he sat for Game 3.

“I think you kind of can figure it out and know what you are doing wrong, what you are doing right and what you need to stay consistent,” Seguin said.

The Canucks inserted Keith Ballard in place of Rome, who was suspended for the duration of the Finals by the league on Tuesday for the hit on Horton.

-- A.J. Perez
Posted on: May 12, 2011 6:37 pm
 

Bergeron still sitting for B's, Seguin to fill in

As the Bruins get ready to take on Tampa Bay starting this weekend, they know they won't have Patrice Bergeron and will instead turn to a rookie.

Bergeron has been out since suffering a concussion in Game 4 against Philadelphia and has yet to assume physical activities.

"All I can say is he keeps progressing on a daily basis," coach Claude Julien said after practice on Thursday. "He hasn't been on the ice, hasn't done any of that stuff yet. We're keeping our fingers crossed that things will start being clear and more optimistic here as we keep moving forward."

He won't be back for Boston right now, but GM Peter Chiarelli admits the team will keep Bergeron's status close to the vest.

So who will fill his spot? That would be rookie Tyler Seguin. The No. 2 overall pick in last year's draft has been a healthy scratch for every game so far this postseason, but that's about to come to an end. From the Bruins blog:

“I mean, Seguin goes into a spot here right now, and we all know he’s capable of making plays, and it’s going to be his first playoff game. We’ve got to give him that opportunity to get his feet wet. And understand, when we say getting his feet wet, you’ve got to give him that opportunity,” Julien said. “He’s also got to show that he deserves to be there and deserves to stay there. And he’s well aware of that.

Now don't expect to see Seguin taking Bergeron's place on the second line, but he will get some ice time for the first time in the playoffs, a little baptism by fire being thrown in the mix starting with the conference finals. No, it's likely he'll play on the third line alongside Rich Peverley and Michael Ryder.

“I think it’s going to go well,” Peverley said. “We’ve played well together in the past and it’s about using our speed and using our assets. I think if we do a good job of getting in on the forecheck and bring a little bit of energy try to be good defensively, hopefully we can help the team a lot.”

The Bruins have had the luxury this year of bringing along Seguin at a slower pace. It was a very unique situation for a player that high in the draft to go to a team like Boston that's prepared to win now. They can thank the Maple Leafs for that. But either way, Seguin will be pushed into action now.

In 74 games this year with the Bruins, Seguin scored 11 goals and had 11 assists.

-- Brian Stubits

Posted on: March 18, 2011 3:05 pm
Edited on: March 18, 2011 3:07 pm
 

Nashville's Hornqvist escapes suspension, fined

Nashville Predators forward Patric Hornqvist received a $2,000 fine, the maximum allowable under the collective bargaining agreement, for the elbow he landed to the head of Boston Bruins forward Tyler Seguin on Thursday night.

An official with the Predators confirmed the fine to CBSSports.com on Friday, which means Hornqvist won’t be suspended like two other players this week for hits to the head. Hornqvist received a five-minute major for elblowing and a game misconduct. 

Seguin required seven stitches to close the gash to his ear lobe. 

The suspension vs. fine delineation may have come down to whether Hornqvist actually used his elbow, which longtime Predators coach Barry Trotz said isn’t so clear on the replays. 

"The referee said, 'I saw his elbow out and make contact with the head,'” Trotz told The Tennessean. "When I watched the replay, Hornqvist had his elbow out, and then as he goes into Seguin he brings his elbow in and actually puts the brakes on and sort of turns. When I looked at it, I really didn't think it was a penalty.""

Here’s the video of the hit, which takes place about 45 seconds into the clip:



-- A.J. Perez
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com