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Tag:Ron Wilson
Posted on: October 6, 2011 10:03 am
 

Daily Skate: EA simulation picks Pens to win Cup

By Brian Stubits

Today is a very special edition of the Daily Skate. We don't have to tell you why, but we will anyway: the season begins tonight! There are three games on tap, including the champion Bruins opening vs. the Flyers Canadiens-Maple Leafs and Penguins-Canucks. Scoreboard

SIMULATION SEASON: Two seasons ago, EA Sports' simulation using their hockey video game picked the Blackhawks to win the Cup and they did. Last season it predicted the Canucks would win the Presidents' Trophy and the Finals would be Vancouver vs. Boston. It was. This season? The Penguins are their champ. Feeling good Pittsburgh? (EA.com)

OPTIMISTIC START: The negotiations are still a few months away, but if you're like me, you're really starting to fear losing another season to labor strife. But new NHLPA boss Donald Fehr isn't. He's optimistic as the season gets under way that they can get a deal done. There will be plenty of time to negotiate, likely beginning around the All-Star break. (Winnipeg Free Press)

THE HEAT WILL BE ON: The over/under (more on that later today) for the number of coaches to be fired mid-season is 1.5 from bodog. The first could be Ron Wilson of the Maple Leafs. He begins the season squarely on the hot seat as expectations are as high as they have been in a while in Toronto. (Toronto Star)

HE COULD BE BACK: That was supposed to be in a Schwarzenegger voice. Anyway, "he" is Sean Avery, the recently waived Rangers forward who many assumed played his last game not only for the Blueshirts, but in the NHL as no team claimed him. Not so fast. GM Glen Sather says if Avery has earned it, no doubt he could be recalled from the AHL, where he was relocated on Wednesday. (New York Post)

PEACE AND QUIET: It's assumed that most players would prefer to play for a rabid fan base in a hockey-crazy city. Considering that qualifies for each of the seven Canadian markets and a majority of players are Canadian, it seems to be a perfect fit. But former Senators star Mike Fisher is enjoying life outside the spotlight with the Predators in Nashville. (Senators Extra)

SKINNER FEVER PART II: Jeff Skinner was a breakout star for the Hurricanes last season, winning the Calder Trophy as the top rookie. He was also a local star, especially among the swooning young girls of Raleigh. He talks about the craziness he went through last year, expectations for the coming season and much more. (Puck Daddy)

UNDERDOGS, EH?: First-year Dallas Stars coach Glen Gulatzan doesn't mind one bit that his team is considered an underdog. With players like Jamie Benn, Mike Ribiero, Brenden Morrow and Loui Eriksson, I can see why he wouldn't mind being below the radar. Oh, and his Canadian accent is pretty thick (just sayin').

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @BrianStubitsNHL on Twitter.

Posted on: April 6, 2011 2:13 am
Edited on: April 6, 2011 2:14 am
 

Morning Skate: Leafs' skid officially extended



The Toronto Maple Leafs’ playoff drought officially reached six seasons on Tuesday, although most of Ontario saw that coming with club’s horrific start. 

The skid, the longest in franchise history, predates the NHL lockout. Two teams (Carolina Hurricanes and Anaheim Ducks) have seized Stanley Cup titles for the first time and two other Original Six franchises (Detroit Red Wings and Chicago Blackhawks) earned championships as the club at the center of the hockey universe has called it a season at 82 games.

Line Changes
  • Eye on Hockey: Vancouver's Torres ejected
  • Eye on Hockey: NYR's Callahan on shelf
  • Buffalo inches closer to playoff berth
  • CBSSports.com playoff tracker
  • So, where was the outrage Tuesday night? Imagine if baseball’s equivalent, the New York Yankees, or the NBA’s Los Angeles Lakes, went that long without a playoff berth. Heck, the fanbases for those franchises would be in an uproar if their teams didn’t secure a title or two. 

    The dependable Damien Cox of the Toronto Star for one wasn’t about to let the Leafs off the hook, understandably setting a good heap of the Leafs' lack of success on GM Brian Burke and coach Ron Wilson: 

    They’ve had their honeymoon period, and now this hockey town needs to demand answers and achievement.

    “I’m not going to conduct an autopsy here,” said Wilson after Tuesday night’s loss to the Caps.
    No problem. We’ll do it for you, coach.

    There were clearly factors that injured the Leaf season, including the failure to identify the organization’s best goaltender earlier, a serious injury to captain Dion Phaneuf, a good but not great season from (Phil) Kessel, the struggles of Mike Komisarek and, of course, that nightmarish power play.

    But the overriding issue that made the first half of the season a disaster and the second half not good enough is that this hockey club still lacks a defining personality, an identity that explains what it wants to be night after night.

    Burke built a solid nucleus in Vacouver, which included drafting the Sedin twins. After his contract was not renewed and a little bit of TV work, Burke needed only two seasons to turn the Ducks into Stanley Cup champs.

    He’s now about to complete his second full season in Toronto without nearly the success despite more resources at his disposal. Burke recently reaffirmed his backing to Wilson, who will return for his fourth season behind Toronto’s bench. 

    Nobody can question the credentials of either Burke or Wilson, but time could be running out for each -- and it doesn’t help that the team has hung out the “for sale” sign and could soon have new ownership that might not be as patient. 

    There are some positives, but who knows if they carry into next season. The Leafs are tied with the Los Angeles Kings with the fifth-most points (41) since the All-Star break. Rookie James Reimer (pictured above) was solid in net down the stretch, oftentimes keeping the Leafs in games to make their late-season run possible. Even in Tuesday’s 3-2 shootout loss to the Washington Capitals, Reimer made 39 saves in regulation and overtime. 

    "We can hold our heads high," said Reimer told the CBC Sports. "We’ve gained a lot of confidence."

    This is the latest, as CBC points out, the Leafs have gone (third-to-last game of the season) before getting eliminated since 2006. I guess that is what is considered progress these days in Toronto. The Leafs were actually eliminated a few minutes before their game ended via Buffalo’s victory over Tampa Bay. 

    "Everybody’s going to be really excited to get back here," Leafs forward Joffery Lupul told the network.

    Maybe it’s odd that the Leafs have lapsed into the “wait ‘til next season” mentality, but it has been 44 years since their last championship. It's quite understandable. 

    TUESDAY'S RESULTS
    Buffalo 4, Tampa Bay 2
    Washington 3 , Toronto 2 (SO)
    Ottawa 5, Philadelphia 2
    Pittsburgh 4, New Jersey 2
    Montreal 2, Chicago 1 (OT)
    St. Louis 3, Colorado 1
    Nashville 6, Atlanta 3
    Dallas 3, Columbus 0
    Edmonton 2, Vancouver 0
     
    -- A.J. Perez

    Photo: Getty Images 

    Posted on: March 31, 2011 1:37 am
    Edited on: March 31, 2011 1:48 am
     

    Morning Skate: Does that seat feel a bit warm?

    Toronto Maple Leafs GM Brian Burke declared Wednesday that Ron Wilson would back next season, even if the club falls short of the playoffs for a sixth consecutive season.

    “I said back in the fall, we would not consider a change, even when all the hounds were baying,” Burke told The Globe and Mail. “I feel the same way now. Ron is coaching this team next year.”

    It's hardly a surprise. Burke and Wilson were teammates back at Providence College and their friendship extends decades. Even if Wilson was already coaching in Toronto when Burke was hired as GM in November 2008, Burke wouldn't have wanted anybody else for the job.

    Other coaches around the NHL may not be so lucky come season's end. Here's a roundup of coaches that may find themselves out of work not long after April 10, the final day of the regular season.

    Cory Clouston, Ottawa Senators: It's not only his position that is shaky. There are no guarantees GM Bryan Murray will back next season. The Sens, who surged into the playoffs and entered as the fifth seed a season ago, never found a rhythm this season -- and that's being charitable. Ottawa is in the basement in the East, so it's fair to say some changes are coming.

    "A lot of things happened this year that put us in a situation where it didn't allow us to get into the playoffs,” Clouston told the Ottawa Citizen last week. "No one feels worse about that than I do, or more responsible for it than I do."

    Pete DeBoer, Florida Panthers: He told reporters that he doesn't know if he'll be back. At least, he's honest. This is his third full season behind the bench in Florida and he has a 102-108-34 record through Wednesday. Dale Tallon, in his first full season as GM ,may have seen enough.

    “I don't worry about next year. I sleep easy at night. I know how hard we have worked as a staff,'' DeBoer told The Miami Herald recently. “I think our team plays with structure and plays hard every night. They have all year. If that's not good enough, that's for other people to decide.’’

    Line Changes

    Todd Richards, Minnesota Wild: This seat got hot in a mere few weeks. The Wild were up to fifth in the West just a month ago before dropping to 11th and all but mathematically out of the playoff contention. (Minnesota also missed the playoffs last season, the first season with Richards was at the helm.)

    "I knew this coming in when I took the job," Richards told the Minnesota Star-Tribune last week. "Are there some things that I would change? Maybe. That's all in hindsight. For the most part, I'm comfortable and happy with the job I've done. It's not the results I want, by any means. It's not the way I want the team playing, by any means. But the opinions, the (hot seat), it goes with the job."

    Then there's probably the only coach among the 16 playoff teams on the hot seat: Washington Capitals coach Bruce Boudreau.

    Back at my previous stop, I piped up and asked questions to Boudreau and principal owner Ted Leonsis if a coaching change was afoot as the Caps were on an eight-game skid before Christmas. Boudreau bristled and said in so many words he doesn't worry about it and Leonsis preached patience.

    That patience may have a limit and we'll put that at an entry into the second round -- and that could be generous. Boudreau could be let go if the Caps don't make it to the conference finals. They have made it past the first round only once in since Boudreau took over in Nov. 2007, including last year's first round exit after the Caps won the Presidents' Trophy. His departure would be a downer for local advertisers in the Washington area since Boudreau pitches everything from rug cleaning services to cars. 

    The hot seat that isn't: Jacques LeMaire, New Jersey Devils. LeMaire's impressive turnaround of the Devils should result in some Jack Adams Award talk. Still, he had to be persuaded out of retirement and was non-committal last week about a return.

    “No. I don't think so. Why not? Because it's not how the team is, how the team plays. It's not about the players, not about the organization. It will be only about myself at that point," Lemaire told The Star Ledger. "What will be good for me."

    Finally, there’s the lukewarm sect. These coaches will likely be back next season, although they may not have much room to do wrong in 2011-12: Joe Sacco (Colorado Avalanche), Scott Arniel (Columbus Blue Jackets), Brent Sutter (Calgary Flames)  Davis Payne (St. Louis Blues) and Jack Capuano (New York Islanders ). 

    Is there anybody else you’d want to nominate?

    DETROIT LOSES BIG: A couple guys named Wayne Gretzky and Mark Messier were teammates on the Edmonton Oilers that last time the Detroit Red Wings allowed eight goals in two periods. 

    Vladimir Sobotka and Chris Stewart don’t quite have the cachet, but they were part of St. Louis Blues team that accomplished the same thing in a 10-3 victory over Detroit on Wednesday. 

    “Thank God it’s over,” Detroit coach Mike Babcock told The Detroit Free Press. “It looked like it was never going to end there for a while. It was unacceptable. Any way you look at it — more than a touchdown — it’s ugly.”

    Ugly and historic. The Red Wings lost 12-3 to the Oilers in March 14, 1986, the game they allowed those eight goals in two periods. The last time they allowed 10 goals in a game was also via a Gretzky-led team, the Los Angeles Kings who won 10-3 in Oct. 9, 1993. 

    WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
    New Jersey 3, NY Islanders 2
    Buffalo 1, NY Rangers 0
    Carolina 6, Montreal 2
    St. Louis 10, Detroit 3
    Anaheim 4, Calgary 2

    -- A.J. Perez
    Photo: Getty Images
     
     
     
     
    The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com