Tag:Shanaban
Posted on: January 5, 2012 11:58 am
Edited on: January 5, 2012 3:25 pm
 

Barch suspended one game for insensitive remarks

By Brian Stubits

Florida Panthers forward Krys Barch was given a game misconduct in the team's New Year's Eve victory over the Montreal Canadiens at the end of the first period. Why he was booted remained a mystery until after the game when it was revealed the reason for his ejection was his use of a racial slur toward Habs defenseman P.K. Subban.

After the hearing was delayed for a couple of days (the Panthers haven't played a game since then), the NHL announced on Thursday that Barch was suspended one game for insensitive remarks.

Notice the use of the language. Insensitive remarks instead of racial slur. Barch was adamant that what he said wasn't racist. Barch told Jesse Spector of the Sporting News that Colin Campbell didn't see it as racial.

"If there was any question that this was racial, you'd be done five to 10 games, and [the decision] would be done the day after," Barch said, quoting Campbell.

"I never would ever say anything unjust or racial toward somebody else," Barch told Sporting News.

As for what he said, we'll never know for sure. But Jeff Marek of Sportsnet reported that it was something along the lines of "did you slip on a banana peel?" after Subban fell to the ice following a scrum.

Here is the statement from Campbell regarding his decision.

"Mr. Barch has admitted making the remark, but denies that the comment was racially motivated,” Campbell said. “While we accept Mr. Barch’s assertion, as a player in the National Hockey League, he must be held accountable for making a comment that, in the context in which it was made, and in light of the entirety of the circumstances, was offensive and unacceptable.”

If that's what he said, I'm failing to get the logic of it all. If Campbell doesn't see that as a racial statement -- very much in the air, some will see it that way, some won't -- then why is it suspendable at all? What about using a Vaudeville-esque comedy bit in a chirp is seen as being worthy of a suspension if you don't believe it was a racial statement?

“There is no debate over what was said,” Panthers coach Kevin Dineen said. “The content or the context of the comment can and should be debated over what the intent of the comments were. I have a lot of respect for Krys Barch and how he’s handled himself the past five days. This has been extremely tough on him. At the end of the day, all the information was laid out there. We respect the league’s decision and move on.”

There are a lot of people that are going to be taken aback by the brevity of a one-game suspension for Barch's alleged actions. It seems to be a light sentence when compared to Sean Avery getting six games when talking about his ex-girlfriend and using the term sloppy seconds. Many are going to say it's another example of Campbell's old wheel of justice. Remember, it's still Campbell's duty to deal with player conduct cases, not Brendan Shanahan's.

This is in pretty stark contrast to Avery, who clear-as-day said his suspendable words to the gathered media. Plus, the intent of Barch's words is debateable, those of Avery were not.

It's worth noting that Barch called Subban personally and explained to him that there was no racial intent behind his comment at all and Subban understood.

To me it feels like the suspension is being given to Barch because the NHL feels there has to be a suspension. This was a much-discussed story when it happened. But I just can't understand how the NHL can view it as non-racial but still worthy of a suspension. It feels like an image decision more than anything.

More NHL Discipline News Here

Photo: Getty Images

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Posted on: January 4, 2012 8:37 pm
Edited on: January 4, 2012 8:41 pm
 

Dan Carcillo suspended 7 games



By: Adam Gretz

The NHL's disciplinary committee has been dropping the hammer all day on Wednesday, and the latest player to face its wrath is Chicago Blackhawks forward Dan Carcillo.

The league had already announced that Carcillo had received an indefinite suspension for his hit from behind on Edmonton defenseman Tom Gilbert on Tuesday night. Carcillo was ejected and given a five-minute major for boarding, a penalty that proved to be costly as Edmonton went on to score a pair of goals on the extended power play during its 4-3 win.

A lengthy suspension was obvious, and on Wednesday evening the league announced that Carcillo has been suspended seven games for the hit.

"Carcillo chips the puck behind Gilbert at the Edmonton blue line creating a race for the end boards," said Brendan Shanahan. "This is a 50/50 puck that either player can win, and in such cases a reasonable amount of physical contact is permissable as the the players jostle for position. However, on this play, Carcillo slows up and gets behind Gilbert, just as Gilbert begins slowing down and bracing himself for some contact, Carcillo explodes into him causing a violent crash into the boards. This is a clear violation of the boarding rule."

Carcillo is a repeat offender in the eyes of the league, and has been fined or suspended nine previous times throughout his NHL career, including a two-game suspension earlier in the season for a similar hit against Carolina defenseman Joni Pitkanen.

That prior history, combined with the violence of the play, as well as the fact that Gilbert was injured, earned Carcillo the second-longest suspension (in terms of regular season games lost) that's been handed out by Shanahan during his time in charge of player safety. Columbus' James Wisniewski missed the first eight games of the regular season for his preseason incident with Minnesota's Cal Clutterbuck.

He won't return to the Chicago lineup until Jan. 18 against the Buffalo Sabres

More NHL Discipline News Here

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Posted on: January 4, 2012 7:28 pm
 

Rene Bourque suspended 5 games



By: Adam Gretz

For the second time this season Calgary Flames forward Rene Bourque has been suspended by the NHL, and this time it's for his elbow to the head of Capitals forward Nicklas Backstrom during the third period of Washington's 3-1 win on Tuesday night.

He had a disciplinary hearing early on Wednesday, and later in the day it was announced by NHL discipline czar Brendan Shanahan that Bourque will miss Calgary's next five games. He was banished earlier in the season for two games for boarding Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Brent Seabrook.

Said Shanahan, "Backstrom is carrying the puck up the middle of the ice as Bourque pivots and pursues Backstrom, Backstrom makes a pass to Mike Knuble on his right. Bourque continues his path and throws an elbow, making principal of contact with Backstrom's jaw. This a hit to the head and a clear violation of rule 48."

Shanahan also added that he believed Bourque's argument that his elbow was an "instinctive" reflex as opposed to an attempt to injure. He also added that it was "reckless" and "indefensible." Bourque's two-game suspension for hitting Seabrook, which occurred less than a month ago making him a repeat offender, as well as the fact that Backstrom removed himself from the game after his condition became worse. He's currently listed as being day-to-day.

In 38 games this season Bourque has scored 13 goals to go with three assists. He will miss games against Boston, Minnesota, New Jersey, Anaheim and Los Angeles. He will be eligible to return to the Flames lineup on Tuesday, Jan. 17 when the Flames travel to San Jose to take on the Sharks.

More NHL Discipline News Here

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Posted on: January 4, 2012 10:23 am
Edited on: January 4, 2012 1:48 pm
 

Rene Bourque has hearing for elbowing Backstrom

By Brian Stubits

While we await Brendan Shanahan's verdict of one repeat offender's actions in Daniel Carcillo, he added another repeat offender to the list of pending suspensions on Tuesday.

Calgary Flames forward Rene Bourque seemed to go out of his way in Tuesday night's game against the Washington Capitals to hit Caps leading scorer Nicklas Backstrom. Despite the puck being up the ice already and it happening behind the play, Bourque gave Backstrom an elbow anyway. To the head. And it's all that he gave him.

The result was a two-minute minor for elbowing, Backstrom having to be evaluated after the game -- though he did play after the hit -- and a hearing being scheduled for Wednesday with Shanahan.

Here are some replays of the hit for you to judge for yourself.

It goes without saying that the Capitals are probably holding their breath right now regarding Backstrom's health. He has been their best and most consistent player this season, an easy pick to go to the All-Star Game representing the Capitals. He assisted on all three of Washington's goals in the 3-1 victory.

“We removed him from the game, it was precautionary,” coach Dale Hunter said on Tuesday night. “He was getting evaluated right now. We’ll know more tomorrow.”

On Wednesday, Hunter called Backstrom day to day.

As to the repeat offender status, Bourque was given a two-game suspension earlier this season from Shanahan for a boarding hit on Blackhawks defenseman Brent Seabrook.

After the game, Bourque told the Washington Post that he wasn't even really aware if anything had happened.

"Did it look really bad? Was he hurt? I didn't even know if I clipped him," Bourque said. "I didn't even know if I hit him in the head."

Well, he did hit him in the head. So now we all know what comes next. Bourque, who has 13 goals and three assists on the season, will be banished to the corner for a timeout for a couple of games.

More NHL Discipline News Here

Photo: Getty Images

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Posted on: January 3, 2012 11:05 am
Edited on: January 3, 2012 3:55 pm
 

Carcillo suspended indefinitely for Gilbert hit

By Brian Stubits

Daniel Carcillo is going to know Brendan Shanahan pretty well soon. At this rate he'll know Shanny's favorite food, his anniversary and exactly how hard Shanahan can lay the hammer down.

The Chicago Blackhawks forward earned himself an indefinite suspension from Shanahan over his hit Monday night on Tom Gilbert of the Edmonton Oilers. It was brutally impressive, an ugly yet eye-popping hit that sent Gilbert careening through the air like a Frisbee.

Holy smokes.

In this era of homer announcers, you know it's bad when the play by play guy's first word after the hit by one of his team's players is "Oh! That's going to be a suspension."

It is, the question remains how many games. That fits a dirty hit by about any definition you want to use. Not to mention boarding -- and interference if you felt so inclined.

"I knew who it was and you have to be aware," Gilbert said. "I should have been more ready for a guy whose made those kind of hits before."

Gilbert, not surprisingly, left the game with an injury from the hit. The kicker? Carcillo did, too. So not only did his hit likely cost him some games and salary from the NHL, it could also cost him some additional time if the injury is bad. Talk about a double whammy.

I admit to getting a little gun-shy on guessing the length of Shanahan suspension calls recently. I thought he let Raffi Torres go too long before suspending him for a third questionable hit in three games and also felt that he missed the boat on the Tomas Kopecky, Michael Del Zotto incident.

But there's no way there's not a hefty suspension for Carcillo here, right? After all, he has already been smacked by the Shanahammer once this season for boarding and has been suspended a somewhat remarkable five times already in his career.

That makes for the Shanahan trifecta: A bad hit that resulted in an injury from a player with a history of supplemental discipline. If there is no suspension from this mix, then I'm left wondering all over again like it's the Colin Campbell era.

I'd guess Carcillo gets an in-person hearing for this, opening up the possibility of five games or more. How many games do you think he should get?

More NHL Discipline News Here

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Posted on: January 2, 2012 9:56 pm
Edited on: January 2, 2012 9:59 pm
 

Raffi Torres suspended 2 games



By: Adam Gretz

Not even a day dominated by the Winter Classic can stop NHL discipline from sneaking into the news.

The NHL announced on Monday evening that Phoenix Coyotes forward Raffi Torres has been suspended two games for a charging incident that took place during their 4-2 win over the Minnesota Wild on Saturday night, not long after he was fined for a hit in his previous game. There was no penalty called on the play, but Brendan Shanahan determined that it was worth him missing the next two games against St. Louis and Los Angeles.

He'll be eligible to return to the lineup on January 7 when the Coyotes host the New York Islanders.

The hit took place midway through the first period when he hit Minnesota's Nate Prosser.

"As the video shows, Torres approaches Prosser just inside the Minnesota blue line as Prosser is making a pass up the ice," said Shanahan. 'Torres is in position to make a clean, full body check. However, rather than drive through his opponents chest or shoulder, Torres rises up and leaves his feet prior to contact, launching himself into Prosser and making significant contact with Prosser's head. While players skates often come off the ice after impact on clean body checks, that is not the case here."

Along with that description, Shanahan also made it known that this was the third game in a row that a hit from Torres has drawn the attention of NHL player safety. Earlier in the week he was fined $2,500 (the maximum fine allowed) for elbowing Colorado's Jan Hejda, a hit that many felt should have resulted in a suspension of its own.

"It is important to note that this is the third game in a row that Torres has gotten the attention of the department of player safety for contact to the head," said Shanahan. "In fact, only hours before the Minnesota game Torres was fined and warned against such actions. In addition, Torres has been fined twice before and was suspended nine months ago for a similar play."

More NHL Discipline News Here

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Posted on: January 1, 2012 10:06 pm
Edited on: January 1, 2012 10:13 pm
 

Blues' Ian Cole suspended three games

By Brian Stubits

Brendan Shanahan began the New Year pretty much the same way he ended the last year: handing out suspensions.

On Sunday night the NHL announced it was suspending St. Louis Blues forward Ian Cole three games for his Saturday night hit on Justin Abdelkader of the Detroit Red Wings.

Here's the video of the hit and Shanahan's explanation.

The review on this one probably didn't take long for the league. It was very evident that the head was the principle point of contact on the play. Cole's shoulder connected square on the jaw of Abdelkader as he entered the offensive zone.

To illustrate how clear-cut of a call this was for him to make, Shanahan referred to this as a "quintessential" example of a bad hit. He went on to say that the hit might not have been intentional, it was reckless -- another word he used multiple times.

The good news is that Abdelkader didn't appear to sustain an injury on the hit. He was a bit wobbly immediately after but did return in the game. It could have easily been much worse.

Also, there was no punishment history to speak of with Cole, so three games is somewhat stiff, it shows how egregious Shanahan saw this hit to be.

I thought Shanahan might have missed on his final few tests of last year -- specifically the Tomas Kopecky/Michael Del Zotto incident as well as the Raffi Torres hit -- but he laid down a fair and just punishment in this case as far as I'm concerned.

More NHL Discipline News Here

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Posted on: December 31, 2011 9:55 pm
Edited on: December 31, 2011 10:56 pm
 

Panthers' Barch ejected for alleged racial slur

By Brian Stubits

It's been an eventful end to the year in Florida. On Friday there was the scrum in the closing seconds of the game that saw Tomas Kopecky punch the Rangers' Michael Del Zotto after being hit in the head with Del Zotto's stick. After the game Florida's Krys Barch talked about there would be scores to settle when the teams meet again next week.

After Saturday night's game against the Montreal Canadiens, Barch might not be there to take part in the settling.

The enforcer the Panthers acquired earlier this season in a trade from the Dallas Stars was given a game misconduct at the end of the first period when the teams had a fracas in front of the net. At first it wasn't immediately clear as to why.

Then George Richards of the Miami Herald reported that the word from the linesman Darren Gibbs was that the reason for the ejection was the fact that Barch hurled a racial slur in the direction of Canadiens defenseman P.K. Subban, who is black.

Renaud P. Lavoie of RDS in Quebec confirmed after the game that Barch was ejected for using a racial slur. He reported that Subban didn't hear the insult but the linesman did.

Panthers general manager Dale Tallon had no comment at the end of the second period but team general partner Cliff Viner shared his disappointment over the incident with the Herald.

“This is not what the character of this organization is about. Period. I'm devastated by that kind of behavior. That is not what we're about as an organization, a team, coaching staff, hockey operations.

"Dale, I'm sure, will be very critical of this. I hope they talk to the team and let them know this is unacceptable. You play hard, you fight hard. But that's not part of any competition."

After the game, Panthers coach Kevin Dineen addressed the Barch incident (also from the Herald).

Said coach Kevin Dinnen: “We have a broken up player back there. He feels extremely bad that there was an insinuation that something inappropriate was said. Now it's a league matter. Obviously the Florida Panthers and Krys Barch are really shoken up about this."

Subban told the Montreal media that he didn't hear a slur and that no one else on his team did either. Erik Cole added that he heard something but wasn't sure what. To paraphrase, he said it could have been something related to Subban's parents.

As Dineen said, now it becomes a league matter. That means it will fall to the league offices, but not Brendan Shanahan's desk. Instead, player conduct issues fall under the jurisdiction of Colin Campbell, the former discipline czar.

Barch's agent, Scott Norton, said he spoke to his client after the game and defended Barch.

"Spoke to client Krys Barch and I 100% stand behind him that there was no racial motivation at all involved! Truth will come out. I have known Krys Barch since he was 15 yrs old, and he is a quality, character human being. He did not, nor would ever, make a racial slur."

Unfortunately, this is something that is still seen around hockey. Even infrequent cases are still too often. Remember in a preseason game between the Detroit Red Wings and Philadelphia Flyers in London, Ontario, Philly's Wayne Simmonds, also black, was moving in on net in the shootout when a fan threw a banana peel on the ice.

Nor is it the first time that Subban has had to deal with some racial insensitivity, if it did happen here. Last season some fans thought it would be a good idea to wear blackface to a game while wearing "Subbanator" shirts.

You don't need me to tell you there is no place for discrimination in the game. When you start to think that it is no longer a problem in the sport, something like this happens. I'm not here to call Barch a racist, I don't know him personally. But if he did use a racial slur he is going to be viewed as such by many.

More NHL Discipline News Here

Photo: Getty Images

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com