Posted on: July 12, 2011 11:35 am
Edited on: July 12, 2011 11:53 am
 

Oklahoma State to unveil new uniforms on July 28

Oklahoma Statewill have a new look this fall as the school will unveil new helmet and jersey combinations on July 28, a source said.

The Cowboys will have three different helmets - black, white and gray - and four different jerseys and pants - black, white, orange and gray - used in varying combinations throughout the season."

Last season, the Cowboys had white helmets with jerseys that were orange, white and black.







Category: NCAAF
Posted on: July 12, 2011 11:17 am
Edited on: July 12, 2011 11:36 am
 

BYU never approached by Big East

PROVO, Utah - Ever since schools began changing conferences, there have been a number of different scenarios floated around concerning what conferences schools might end up in. A couple of months ago, a BYU fan website reported that the Cougars had been approached by the Big East to gauge their interest in joining the Big East.

There was only one problem - it wasn't true.

"We've never been approached or talked with the Big East about membership in their league," BYU athletic director Tom Holmoe told CBSSports.com. "We never had an offer from the Big East.

"We haven't been invited to a BCS conference."

Two months ago, a BYU fan website - Deep Shades of Blue - reported that "the conference did indeed contact BYU about becoming a football-only member, but that the proposal was turned down by the BYU administration."

Holmoe and various Big East officials disputed that report.

BYU left the Mountain West to become an independent. I asked Holmoe would the school have been interested in a move to the Big East? 

"At the time, you never know, but it’s probably too far," Holmoe said. "A lot of things come into play with that, including missed school time. It didn’t happen, so it’s all speculative."



Category: NCAAF
Posted on: July 11, 2011 1:32 pm
Edited on: July 11, 2011 1:40 pm
 

Biggest winners after major infractions

In part III of CBSSports.com’s series on cheating in college football, I found out that the majority of schools that have committed major violations in the past 25 years actually have had a better record after the infractions.

So much for penalizing the guilty.

Anyway, in my report, I listed the 10 schools that have been hurt the most by the infractions since 1987.

Here’s a look at the 10 schools that fared the best after getting nailed by the NCAA. And if I’m California, I start committing some violations immediately. Because the last two times Cal committed major infractions the Golden Bears improved drastically over the next five years.

OK, so maybe it’s not that simple. But after Cal’s 1988 infractions, they won 18 more games in the next five years than the previous five seasons. The 2002 violations brought a five-year improvement of 27 wins – more than five per season compared to the previous five seasons.

Well, maybe, it had something to do with Cal’s coaching changes. Bruce Snyder replaced Joe Kapp in 1987 and Jeff Tedford replaced Tom Holmoe in 2002.

In the chart below, the year designates the year of the infraction. The improvement in wins is the number for the five seasons after compared to the five seasons before the violation.

Year School Improvement in wins

2002 California +27
2003 Rutgers +22
2001 USC +20
1988 California +18
1990 Florida +17
1997 UTEP +13
1997 Georgia +11
1996 Miss. State +9
1993 Auburn +8
1987 Texas Tech +8



Posted on: July 8, 2011 5:24 pm
 

Ohio State's penalties won't be financial

By playing in the Sugar Bowl, Ohio State earned the Big Ten Conference $6 million as the league’s second BCS bowl team. And Ohio State and the league will keep every penny since the BCS has no power to impose any financial penalties on the Buckeyes.

“The BCS is not a governance body nor an investigative body,” BCS executive director Bill Hancock told CBSSports.com. “Policy is that the BCS group would act only at the conclusion of the NCAA process, and only if the NCAA returns findings.”

On Friday, Ohio State vacated all of its 2010 victories, including the 31-26 win against Arkansas, and put itself on two years probation. Jim Tressel, who covered up and lied about multiple NCAA violations, left the school on May 30. A handful of players have been suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season (but were allowed by the NCAA to play in the Sugar Bowl).

Ohio State will go before the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions next month. Further penalties are possible – just not financial ones.

The NCAA Committee on Infractions cannot withhold bowl money from a football program for committing major NCAA violations.

"The key here is unlike NCAA championships, where if you have to vacate a Final Four [appearance], the Committee on Infractions and NCAA can mandate that you as an institution return monies to the NCAA,” said Joe D’Antonio, the Big East’s senior associate commissioner for compliance. “The BCS is not controlled by the NCAA. Consequently the Committee on Infractions cannot impose those types of [financial] penalties.”



Posted on: July 8, 2011 1:05 pm
Edited on: July 8, 2011 1:19 pm
 

Presenting NCAA's most frequent cheaters club

As our series on college football’s cheaters continues today, I looked at the most frequent cheaters – at least in terms of major infractions – since SMU received the Death Penalty in 1987.

It’s a neck-and-neck race between Alabama and Texas Tech, with three major infractions each.

There are also a dozen teams – Cal, Colorado, Florida International, Florida State, Illinois, Minnesota, Mississippi State, Oklahoma, SMU, Texas A&M, USC and Washington – with two infractions each

Here are the remaining 42 teams with one major infraction each: Arkansas, Arkansas State, Arizona State, Auburn, Ball State, Baylor, Central Florida, Cincinnati, Clemson, Florida, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Houston, Kansas, Kansas State, Kentucky, Louisiana Lafayette, Marshall, Maryland, Memphis, Miami, Michigan, Michigan State, Mississippi, New Mexico, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Oklahoma State, Oregon, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, San Diego State, South Carolina, Syracuse, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, UTEP, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Washington State and Wisconsin.

In all 56 of the 120 FBS programs have committed a major infraction in the past 25 years, including nearly two-thirds of the automatic qualifying BCS programs.

By the way, I loved a response on Twitter from @FGrimes1 – listed as Forrest Grimes – defending Texas Tech’s three major infractions. He wrote: “Most of Techs major infractions came around the same time, way to make Tech look like a contuinously dirty program a--hole."

For Mr. Grimes’ information, Tech’s violations were not at the same time – but spaced more than 10 years apart in 1987, 1998 and on Jan. 7, 2011 – during Grimes’ current semester as a journalism major at Tech

While our two-week series is looking at whether schools can win without cheating, I think it’s important to recognize the 23 AQ BCS programs that have not committed a major infraction since 1987 … so far.

ACC–Boston College, Duke, North Carolina, N.C. State, Wake Forest.
Big East–UConn, Louisville, South Florida, West Virginia.
Big Ten–Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, Purdue.
Big 12–Iowa State, Missouri.
Pac-12–Arizona, Oregon State, Stanford, UCLA.
SEC–LSU, Vanderbilt


Posted on: June 23, 2011 5:01 pm
Edited on: June 24, 2011 12:13 pm
 

Who survives among the not so Fab 5?

CBSSports.com’s Dennis Dodd unveiled his annual Hot Seat Ratings for all 120 FBS coaches today. Here’s a look at his complete ratings, with coaches rated from 0 (untouchable) to 5 (scorching).

We have good news for 115 coaches: you received lower than a 4-rating on Dodd’s hot scale and while that’s not a guarantee you’ll be coaching next fall, your odds are a lot better than the remaining five.

Those other five coaches – Washington State’s Paul Wulff, New Mexico’s Mike Locksley, UCLA’s Rick Neuheisel, Tulane’s Bob Toledo and Illinois’ Ron Zook – might want to turn up their AC units. They received between a 4 or 5 rating: 4-4.5 is “Warm seat – feeling the pressure” and 5 is “On the hot seat – it’s time to win now.”

Looking back at Dodd’s Hot Seat Ratings for the past three seasons, he has given 19 coaches between a 4 and 5 rating. Of those coaches, 13 of 19 – or 68.4 percent – were fired before the next season.

Dodd also has only handed out the dreaded 5 rating to five coaches and four of the five were fired that season – Louisville’s Steve Kragthorpe (2009), North Texas’ Todd Dodge (2010), Colorado’s Dan Hawkins (2010) and Michigan’s Rich Rodriguez (2010). 

Only Wulff, who received a 5 rating in 2010, survived. But now Dodd has stuck Wulff with another 5 this season.

Based on Dodd’s ratings the past three seasons, at least three, maybe four, coaches among Wulff, Locksley, Neuheisel, Toledo and Zook will not be back in 2012.

Which coach of the not so Fab 5 will survive and who did Dodd totally miss the boat on and not give a 4 or 5 rating that deserved one?

2011 Hot Seat Rating
5 Paul Wulff, Washington State
4.5 Mike Locksley, New Mexico
4 Rick Neuheisel, UCLA
4 Bob Toledo, Tulane
4 Ron Zook, Illinois

2010 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
5 Todd Dodge, North Texas
5 Dan Hawkins, Colorado
5 Rich Rodriguez, Michigan
4.5 Ralph Friedgen, Maryland
4 Tim Brewster, Minnesota
4 Bill Lynch, Indiana

Survived
5 Paul Wulff, Washington State
4.5 Mike Locksley, New Mexico
4.5 Ron Zook, Illinois

2009 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
5 Steve Kragthorpe, Louisville
4 Al Groh, Virginia
4 Mark Snyder, Marshall
4 Charlie Weis, Notre Dame

Survived
4 Todd Dodge, North Texas

2008 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
4.95 Ty Willingham, Washington
4.5 Greg Robinson, Syracuse
4 Brent Guy, Utah State

Survived
4 Mike Sanford, UNLV
4 Mike Stoops, Arizona


Posted on: June 21, 2011 3:26 pm
Edited on: June 22, 2011 8:51 am
 

Rutgers snares 5th highest per year stadium deal

High Point Solution Stadium. Not exactly the most tradition rich name in college sports, but, hey, it is the newest. Tuesday, Rutgers announced a 10-year naming rights deal with High Points Solution worth $6.5 million.

The initial reaction on my Twitter feed to a corporation naming a college stadium was "Ugh." But if you haven't figured out by now how vital big bucks are in college football these days, then it's time for you to take off your leather helmet and put it in storage.

Remember a time when bowl games were actually named after fruits and not dot.com businesses or car muffler stores? Yeah, me neither. Now it's a rarity if a bowl game isn't named after a corporation. Years from now, the same - unfortunately - will be said about college football stadiums.

Anyway, Rutgers' deal is the fifth-highest per year amount for a college stadium named after a corporation/business. This list does not include stadiums named after individuals who may have contributed several gazillion dollars (i.e. Oklahoma State's Boone Pickens Stadium). This list also does not include college teams that play in NFL stadiums, such as Pittsburgh's Heinz Field or South Florida's Raymond James Stadium.

Here are the 11 college stadiums named after corporations and I'm sure this list will double within the next five years. For what it's worth the breakdown of corporation named college stadiums by conference: Big East (3), ACC (2), Sun Belt (2), Big Ten (1), Big 12 (1), C-USA (1) and MAC (1). (1).

School (Year) Stadium Name; Terms

Minnesota (2005) TCF Bank Stadium; 25 years, $35 million
Per year average: $1.4 million

UCF (2006) Bright House Networks Stadium; 15 yrs, $15 million
Per year average: $1 million

Maryland (2006) Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Texas Tech (2006) Jones AT&T Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Rutgers (2011) High Point Solutions Stadium; 10 years, $6.5 million
Per year average: $650,000

Louisville (1998) Papa John's Cardinal Stadium; 10 years, $5 million
Per year average: $500,000

Louisville (2004) Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium; 33 years, $15 million
Per year average: $454,000

Akron (2009) InfoCision Stadium; 20 years, $10 million
Per year average: $500,000

Troy (2003) Movie Gallery Veterans Stadium; 20 yrs, $5 million
Per year average: $250,000

Syracuse (1980) Carrier Dome; Indefinite, $2.75 million
Per year average: n/a

Wake Forest (2007) BB&T Field; 10 years, undisclosed
Per year average: n/a

Western Kentucky (2007) Houchens Industries-L.T. Smith Stadium; unknown, $5 million
Per year average: n/a



Posted on: June 20, 2011 9:42 pm
Edited on: June 21, 2011 8:52 am
 

How Big East deal would have compared to others

One billion dollars. That's what the Big East turned down from ESPN last month, sources told CBSSports.com. Of course that doesn't mean the league won't get the same offer - or more - from ESPN, NBC/Comcast or Fox in the next several months.

The offer on the table, though, was a good one. Sources said ESPN offered to extend its current deal with the league for nine years at between $110 million to $130 million annually, or about a $1 billion for the entire deal. That would have drawn the Big East a lot closer to the other AQ BCS leagues and locked them up through the 2022-23 school year.

"Whatever that gap is [between the Big East and other five AQ BCS leagues], it would have been as small [a difference to the others] as possible," a college football industry source told CBSSports.com. "You [the Big East] don't want to be so far in the rear view mirror that you're not connected with the other five."

Here's how the Big East's proposed deal would have stacked up with the other big boys. Of course, remember these deals represent different lengths of contracts and also a different membership size, so it's not necessarily an apples-to-apples comparison as far as per school value. But it would have put the Big East in the same neighborhood.

Big East offer: $990,000 to $1.17 billion over nine years from ESPN/ABC
ACC:
$1.86 billion from ESPN/ABC over 12 years
Big 12: $1.1 billion from Fox over 13 years, $480 million from ESPN/ABC for eight years. This does not include Texas' $15 million from ESPN for its Longhorn Network.
Big Ten: $2.8 billion from Big Ten Network for 25 years, $1 billion from ESPN/ABC through 2016
SEC: $2.25 billion from ESPN for 15 years, $825 billion from CBS for 15 years
Pac-12: $3 billion from ESPN and Fox for 12 years



Category: NCAAF
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com