Tag:Big Ten
Posted on: February 23, 2012 10:54 am
 

MWC continues to wait on AQ BCS exemption

DALLAS – While the Mountain West finally knows exactly who will be playing in the league this season, the MWC may have to wait seven more months before knowing if it will be an automatic qualifying BCS league in the next two seasons.

In December, the Mountain West applied for a BCS exemption, which would allow the league champion to receive an automatic bid to one of the BCS bowls. The exemption must be voted on by the 12-member Presidential Oversight Committee, with nine votes needed for approval.

That committee, which consists of a president from each of the 11 Football Bowl Subdivision conferences and Notre Dame’s president, doesn’t appear in any rush to rule on the Mountain West’s AQ status.

BCS executive director Bill Hancock told CBSSports.com Wednesday that the BCS will continue to try to get the Presidential Oversight Committee together on a conference call, but Hancock said there is no immediate deadline when the committee would vote and one may not be conducted until the start of the season, in late August or early September.

On Dec. 13, 2011, the Mountain West filed an exemption, claiming it met the necessary requirements to earn its champion an automatic berth to one of the five BCS bowls.

In its four-page letter to the Oversight Committee, the Mountain West stated that “important factors are at the core of the Committee’s consideration of this request for an exemption – precedent and performance. The BCS has a well-established history of granting automatic qualification exemptions. Equally important, the performance of the Mountain West during the evaluation period has clearly been deserving of automatic-qualifying status.”

The Mountain West claims the Big East was granted BCS access and kept its AQ without meeting qualification standards in February 2004 “apparently based on reputation and relationships, rather than demonstrated performance.”

Despite having only seven members for the 2004 season, after the departures of Miami and Virginia Tech to the ACC, the Big East retained its AQ status from 2004-07.

“It is only appropriate that the Mountain West's exemption request be considered in that context and a consistency of approach be maintained,” the league wrote to the committee.

Because the Mountain West, along with Conference USA, is dissolving and forming a new league in 2013, Mountain West commissioner Craig Thompson told CBSSports.com the Presidential Oversight Committee recently requested information regarding those plans for the new conference.

“We are in the process of answering,” Thompson said.

Because the Mountain West will be an entirely different league in 2013, Hancock said he doesn’t know if the MWC would receive AQ status in both the 2012 and 2013 seasons.

“No one knows about that,” Hancock said. “They might or might not. That would have to be revisited.”

The Mountain West met two of the three criteria for an exemption and were just outside at No. 7 in the third (needing to be ranked among the top six conferences in overall strength of the league based on the computer polls). The ACC and Big East also fell short of the threshold to retain their automatic qualification status after the four-year evaluation cycle (2008-2011), but aren’t being evaluated against these same standards. In fact, the Big East’s numbers wouldn’t even qualify it to request an exemption. 

Thompson said Wednesday he would characterize the Mountain West’s chances “as neutral right now.”

“TCU and West Virginia’s moves (to the Big 12 from the Mountain West and Big East, respectively) really effects three leagues, although two have AQ status,” Thompson said. “That shows the volatility of the college landscape.”

That landscape continues shifting and changing – sometimes on a weekly basis. While the Big East wouldn’t pay Boise State’s exit fees to leave the Mountain West this season, the Mountain West won’t technically exist next season. It will have totally new membership and a new name.

The Big East, which is close to adding Temple for the 2012 season, also will have a new look with anywhere from 11 to 13 members in 2013, depending if Pittsburgh and Syracuse leave early for the ACC. The Big 12, currently set for 10 members in 2012, could decide to expand for the 2013 season.

And who knows what else might happen involving conference realignment in the next 12-18 months?

One thing is certain: if the Mountain West is granted an exemption for the next two seasons, it would be mean one fewer team would qualify for an at-large spot in one of the five BCS bowls during the next two seasons.

If the MWC earns an exemption, the champions from the Pac-12, Big Ten, SEC, ACC, Big 12, Big East and MWC would all earn automatic berths to the BCS bowls. The remaining three spots would be filled by at-large selections, reducing the number of conferences with potentially two BCS bowl teams from four to three.

Posted on: December 8, 2011 5:13 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 5:54 pm
 

Big Ten's Delany on SEC: "They've dominated"

NEW YORK – The following is a public service announcement about the Southeastern Conference from – huh, what’s this? – Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany?

Delany was asked Thursday if the SEC wields too much power in college football today.

“Whatever credibility they have sort of developed, it’s on the field in our system,” Delany said. “And they’ve had great athletes and some great coaches and together, over a period of over half a decade, they’ve dominated at the elite level.”

The SEC has won five consecutive BCS national titles and has clinched a sixth with SEC rivals LSU and Alabama meeting for the BCS championship on Jan. 9 in New Orleans.

“I think they’ve earned it and they’ve deserved it,” Delany said. “When there’s a benefit of the doubt, I think it’s very natural for them to get it. Until you beat them on the field, in the system, they deserve that benefit.

“Who deserves it more than the reigning champion? You have to beat the champion, whether that’s in heavyweight prize fighting or in the BCS. When all things are equal, I think you have to lean toward the entity that has produced the result over time.”




Category: NCAAF
Posted on: December 8, 2011 11:43 am
Edited on: December 8, 2011 1:16 pm
 

BCS AQ status likely gone in 2014

NEW YORK – For all the critics of the BCS, rejoice: it appears that the BCS automatic qualifying status format will be gone in 2014.

At least that’s the indication that Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany and Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowsky gave during Thursday’s IMG Forum at the Marriott Marquis.

“Some of the people that don’t have (BCS AQ status), say they don’t want it,” Delany said. “Some of the people that do have it, don’t really care about it. Maybe it needs to be reconsidered. I’m not wed to it. I’m wed to the 1-2 game and I’m wed to the Rose Bowl. I’m not wed to the (BCS AQ) selection process or the limitations.”

The current BCS format expires after the 2013 season. There is growing speculation that when the new format is voted on and established in 2014, it could simply be reduced to only pitting the No. 1 and No. 2 teams in a bowl game or a Plus-One model (the top four teams would be seeded in the bowl games).

Either the Plus-One or without the Plus-One model would allow the other current BCS bowl games – Fiesta, Sugar, Orange and Rose – to simply align with whichever conferences they want and would not be required to select teams based on a BCS ranking.

"I feel strongly it’s been a negative driver from our perspective,” Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowsky. “I hope to be involved in a BCS we do it in a way where we can create a more happy BCS without these class systems. I think it’s possible to do it. In a competitive format that requires teams to be competitive teams in order to participate.”

Added Delany: “As long as I can go to the Rose Bowl, I don’t really care,” Delany said.

Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick isn't in favor of the Plus-One model, but expects change in 2014.

“(Without the BCS AQ format) takes so many forms, it's hard to draw a conclusion from that," Swarbrick said. "You could fashion a version which probably would be good. It doesn’t take a lot of imagination to fashion a version that might not be good."

Posted on: November 14, 2011 11:36 am
Edited on: November 14, 2011 12:13 pm
 

Big Ten removes Paterno's name from trophy

Former Penn State coach Joe Paterno's name has been removed from the Big Ten's football championship trophy, league commissioner Jim Delany said Monday.

The league announced in light of the series of events that have recently unfolded at Penn State, including grand jury indictments, an ongoing grand jury investigation, a U.S. Department of Education investigation, the Board of Trustees’ dismissal of Paterno and the Board of Trustees’ appointment of a Special Investigation Committee, it would remove Paterno’s name from the championship trophy.

The trophy will be awarded at the Big Ten's inaugural football championship game Dec. 3 in Indianapolis.

“We believe that it would be inappropriate to keep Joe Paterno’s name on the trophy at this time,” Delany said. “The trophy and its namesake are intended to be celebratory and aspirational, not controversial. We believe that it’s important to keep the focus on the players and the teams that will be competing in the inaugural championship game.”

The trophy to be presented in Indianapolis next month will now be called the "Stagg Championship Trophy," named after Amos Alonzo Stagg, who coached football at the University of Chicago, a founding member of the Big Ten, from 1892-1932. Stagg compiled a 199-94-22 record while the University of Chicago was a member of the Big Ten, including national championships in 1905 and 1913.

The great grandson of Stagg, Robert Stagg of Grand Rapids, Mich., said Monday the family deferred to the Big Ten on the decision. Stagg told CBSSports.com last week the family would have issues with the trophy's name if Paterno was found "complicit" in the Sandusky scandal.

"We as a family are deferring to them (Big Ten). It was a proper thing to do," Robert Stagg told CBSSports.com. "They have a lot more people to consider things. I pretty much let them steer the whole process. They were aware we were interested in how things were going to play out."

Asked for a reaction to Paterno's name being removed from the trophy, Stagg said: "I still think it’s too early in the process to make a judgement. It’s such an unfortunate situation. I just have a feeling there is a lot more coming out."

Paterno was fired on Wednesday night for his failure to notify police about the sexual abuse allegations of former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky.

Saturday, in Penn State's first game since Paterno was fired - the Nittany Lions' first without Paterno as head coach since 1966 and the first game since Nov. 19, 1949, Paterno was neither a Penn State head coach or assistant - the Nittany Lions lost to Nebraska 17-14.

However, the Nittany Lions (8-1, 5-2 Big Ten) still lead the Big Ten's Leaders Division by one-game over Wisconsin (8-2, 4-2). Penn State visits Ohio State Saturday and Wisconsin visits Illinois. No matter the outcome of the Penn State-Ohio State contest, if Wisconsin wins at Illinois, the Badgers and Nittany Lions will play Nov. 26 in Madison, Wis., for the Leaders Division title and berth in the inaugural Big Ten championship game. Penn State would clinch the Leaders Division title by beating Ohio State and if Wisconsin lost to Illinois Saturday.

In the Legends Division, Michigan State (8-2, 5-1) owns a one-game lead over Michigan (8-2, 4-2) and Nebraska (8-2, 4-2). The Spartans will win the Legends Division by winning their final two games against Indiana and Northwestern. Nebraska visits Michigan Saturday. Both the Cornhuskers and Wolverines must win out and need a Michigan State loss to have any chance at winning the Legends Division.
Category: NCAAF
Posted on: October 6, 2011 5:02 pm
Edited on: October 6, 2011 5:43 pm
 

Notre Dame's football independence now at risk

When news broke Thursday that TCU was joining the Big 12 Conference instead of the Big East, it was just another domino in the latest craze sweeping across America: Conference realignment!

Another piece that might be teetering: Notre Dame.

For the Big East, losing TCU is another sucker punch to the groin or -- as Illinois’ Jonathan Brown prefers -- a knee to the groin.

Sure technically the Big East never really had TCU since the Horned Frogs weren’t officially joining the league until July 1, 2012, but the loss of what could have been is even more devastating for the Big East.

In the matter of weeks, the Big East has lost Syracuse and Pittsburgh to the ACC and now TCU to the Big 12. And if Missouri leaves for the SEC, sources have told CBSSports.com the Big 12 will likely add three more schools to get to 12 members. At the top of that list, sources said, is Louisville, along with a combination of BYU, West Virginia, Cincinnati or Tulane.

Losing Louisville and West Virginia or Cincinnati would likely be a fatal blow to the Big East's football BCS status. As damaging as these defections are to the Big East, it could have an even greater impact on the behemoth of college football.

Even before man invented fire, the Fighting Irish’s football program has been an independent. And Notre Dame plans on staying an independent until the galaxy explodes -- or until the Big East implodes -- whichever happens first.

So while the Big East’s pulse continues to weaken, Notre Dame could be forced to join a conference. The Fighting Irish have enjoyed the benefit of remaining a football independent, while their non-football sports competed in the Big East. Those days could be numbered.

"Certainly the factors that have contributed to the larger conference realignment continue to exist," Notre Dame AD Jack Swarbrick told the Associated Press on Wednesday, a day before the news about TCU leaving to the Big 12. "And we’re doing the same thing we’ve done throughout, monitoring them closely, and hoping that the Big East stays a vibrant and successful partner for us."

But if there’s no Big East, then Notre Dame becomes the Holy Grail of college football. The Big 12, the Big Ten, the ACC and the SEC would add the Fighting Irish yesterday. Heck, even the Pac-12’s Larry Scott would find a way to bring the Irish on board if he could.

I’ve maintained that as long as Notre Dame has a conference home to put its non-football or Olympic sports (men’s basketball, women’s basketball, etc.) in it will never join a conference. But things are about to get interesting for Notre Dame.

If the Big East no longer exists, Notre Dame will have two options: Join the Big 12/Big Ten/ACC/SEC as a full member or stay independent in football and join one of those conferences with its non-football sports.

It will depend on how bad Notre Dame cherishes its football independence, because I’m sure one of those four conferences would prefer Notre Dame as a non-football member (and the guarantee of Notre Dame being on those future football schedules) to having Notre Dame in another league.

Before TCU and the Big 12’s announcement on Thursday, Swarbrick said Wednesday Notre Dame needed to continue to support the league.

"They’re [the Big East] working on additions," he said. "You got to wait until the whole picture is shaped to really have a feel for it, for what that option is like. Just continue to support them and be involved in their planning and hope they wind up in a great place.

"It's great to make plans. It’s whether the people you might be interested in or the circumstances will allow you to achieve those plans. But certainly the way the conference is thinking and what it’s trying to achieve are consistent with what I think it needs to do."

That was Swarbrick’s view Wednesday. That all changed Thursday with TCU headed to the Big 12 and there are likely more changes ahead. The question remains: will it be enough to force Notre Dame to give up its independence?


Posted on: October 6, 2011 5:02 pm
Edited on: October 6, 2011 5:43 pm
 

Notre Dame's football independence now at risk

When news broke Thursday that TCU was joining the Big 12 Conference instead of the Big East, it was just another domino in the latest craze sweeping across America: Conference realignment!

Another piece that might be teetering: Notre Dame.

For the Big East, losing TCU is another sucker punch to the groin or -- as Illinois’ Jonathan Brown prefers -- a knee to the groin.

Sure technically the Big East never really had TCU since the Horned Frogs weren’t officially joining the league until July 1, 2012, but the loss of what could have been is even more devastating for the Big East.

In the matter of weeks, the Big East has lost Syracuse and Pittsburgh to the ACC and now TCU to the Big 12. And if Missouri leaves for the SEC, sources have told CBSSports.com the Big 12 will likely add three more schools to get to 12 members. At the top of that list, sources said, is Louisville, along with a combination of BYU, West Virginia, Cincinnati or Tulane.

Losing Louisville and West Virginia or Cincinnati would likely be a fatal blow to the Big East's football BCS status. As damaging as these defections are to the Big East, it could have an even greater impact on the behemoth of college football.

Even before man invented fire, the Fighting Irish’s football program has been an independent. And Notre Dame plans on staying an independent until the galaxy explodes -- or until the Big East implodes -- whichever happens first.

So while the Big East’s pulse continues to weaken, Notre Dame could be forced to join a conference. The Fighting Irish have enjoyed the benefit of remaining a football independent, while their non-football sports competed in the Big East. Those days could be numbered.

"Certainly the factors that have contributed to the larger conference realignment continue to exist," Notre Dame AD Jack Swarbrick told the Associated Press on Wednesday, a day before the news about TCU leaving to the Big 12. "And we’re doing the same thing we’ve done throughout, monitoring them closely, and hoping that the Big East stays a vibrant and successful partner for us."

But if there’s no Big East, then Notre Dame becomes the Holy Grail of college football. The Big 12, the Big Ten, the ACC and the SEC would add the Fighting Irish yesterday. Heck, even the Pac-12’s Larry Scott would find a way to bring the Irish on board if he could.

I’ve maintained that as long as Notre Dame has a conference home to put its non-football or Olympic sports (men’s basketball, women’s basketball, etc.) in it will never join a conference. But things are about to get interesting for Notre Dame.

If the Big East no longer exists, Notre Dame will have two options: Join the Big 12/Big Ten/ACC/SEC as a full member or stay independent in football and join one of those conferences with its non-football sports.

It will depend on how bad Notre Dame cherishes its football independence, because I’m sure one of those four conferences would prefer Notre Dame as a non-football member (and the guarantee of Notre Dame being on those future football schedules) to having Notre Dame in another league.

Before TCU and the Big 12’s announcement on Thursday, Swarbrick said Wednesday Notre Dame needed to continue to support the league.

"They’re [the Big East] working on additions," he said. "You got to wait until the whole picture is shaped to really have a feel for it, for what that option is like. Just continue to support them and be involved in their planning and hope they wind up in a great place.

"It's great to make plans. It’s whether the people you might be interested in or the circumstances will allow you to achieve those plans. But certainly the way the conference is thinking and what it’s trying to achieve are consistent with what I think it needs to do."

That was Swarbrick’s view Wednesday. That all changed Thursday with TCU headed to the Big 12 and there are likely more changes ahead. The question remains: will it be enough to force Notre Dame to give up its independence?


Posted on: September 3, 2011 1:48 pm
 

Oklahoma State's thoughts on Big 12 future

Oklahoma State President Burns Hargis released a statement Saturday regarding Big 12 Conference discussions.

"We want to be clear that we worked actively to encourage Texas A&M to remain in the Big 12 Conference and regret they decided to leave," Hargis said. "We are moving ahead.

"Oklahoma State University's athletic program has never been stronger from top to bottom, putting us in a position to explore and pursue options, including the possible expansion of our current conference. We are in close communications with our colleagues at the University of Oklahoma and expect a decision soon that will be in the best interest of our institutions and the state of Oklahoma."

In other words, if Oklahoma is leaving to the Pac-12/16, Oklahoma State fully expects to go with them.

Hargis' statement comes a day after Oklahoma President David Boren said the Sooners had been contacted by multiple conferences and that the Sooners were not "going to be a wallflower when all is said and done."

Like Hargis, Boren said he tried to prevent Texas A&M from leaving the Big 12. The Aggies are expected to join the SEC.

Boren said the Sooners expect to decide whether to leave in three weeks. He said he flew to Missouri to confer with chancellor Brady Deaton,the chairman of the Big 12 board of directors, and to College Station, Texas, to try to prevent Texas A&M from leaving for the SEC.

Oklahoma was offered chances to join both the Pac-10 and the SEC last year, but decided to stick with the Big 12, even as Nebraska left to join the Big Ten and Colorado joined the Pac-10, now the Pac-12.

"Of course, we have some great partners in the existing Big 12," Boren said. "We have interest from other conferences and other universities, so it's really a tribute to the strength of our program at the University of Oklahoma that there is so much interest in us.

"So, we have to carefully evaluate the various comments that are being made to us and the various possibilities that are being shown to us before we decide what's best for the university to do."


Posted on: August 17, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 1:36 pm
 

Emmert: no conference realignment summit

After NCAA president Mark Emmert read erroneous media reports that he planned to have a summit on conference realignment, he emailed several officials throughout intercollegiate athletics to clarify no meetings would take place.

CBSSports.com obtained the document Emmert sent out.

"I have been and will continue to engage individual presidents and commissioners about the reform effort that was launched last week as part of the Division I presidential retreat," Emmert wrote. "In that context, all constituents have been involved in meaningful discussion on how best to conduct our business, including conference realignments, in the best interests of student-athletes. Open and frank discussion is needed to ensure expected reforms are not derailed in any way. However, I have not proposed, nor do I have plans to propose a summit on conference realignment as recently reported by several media outlets. Such reports are simply in error."

Getting all the key players from the SEC, Big 12, Pac-12, Big Ten, ACC and Big East conferences together to discuss conference realignment would seem like a good idea for the future of college athletics. But an NCAA spokesman said that was never a consideration.

"Conference affilations are the purview of the conferences not the NCAA," said Bob Williams, the NCAA's vice president of communications.

I asked Williams if there also were legal reasons why Emmert wouldn't meet with the BCS conference commissioners.

"Antitrust is always an issue," he said.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com