Tag:Charlie Strong
Posted on: June 17, 2011 4:24 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2011 4:45 pm
 

Schools: NCAA's APR data for coaches not fair

Charlie Strong was hired at Louisville on Dec. 9, 2009. So he obviously did not coach the Cardinals during the 2009-10 season. But don’t tell the NCAA that, because according to how the NCAA computes the Academic Progress Rate (APR) scores, Strong was just as responsible for the Cardinals’ low APR score as former coach Steve Kragthorpe.

Because Strong was at the school during the 2009-10 school year, the NCAA gives Strong and Kragthorpe equal credit for the Cardinals’ APR score that year.

UL’s 869 APR out of 1,000 was the worst APR score among the 120 Football Bowl Subdivision schools in 2009-10.

In Wednesday’s study of the APR averages of the FBS coaches by CBSSports.com, I used the data provided by the NCAA. The coaches year-by-year APR scores are available on the NCAA’s website, if you want to check it out for yourself.

At least two schools – Louisville and UCF – believe the way the NCAA calculates the APR scores for coaches is not fair and misleading. Louisville believes Strong should not be saddled with the 2009-10 score of 869 - the school expects the 2010-11 APR to be significantly better.

UCF also believes Coach George O’Leary should not be credited with the 880 from the 2003-04 year because O’Leary was hired at UCF on Dec. 8, 2003.

UCF felt strongly enough about how the NCAA calculates the coaches APR scores, the school posted a story on its website following the CBSSports.com study. UCF's story did not include O'Leary's 2003-04 880 APR score. Louisville officials prefered not to comment for this story.

Based on the NCAA’s data, Strong ranked as the coach with the worst APR in FBS. Three other coaches that had the nation’s seven-worst coaching APRs – Akron’s Rob Ianello (900), Memphis’ Larry Porter (903) and Buffalo’s Jeff Quinn (918) – also were credited for a dismal APR score even though they arrived after that football season had been completed.

I e-mailed NCAA spokesman Eric Christianson Thursday, asking for an explanation why the NCAA computes the APR’s of the coaches that way. When I receive a response, I will let you know.



Posted on: May 24, 2011 1:45 pm
 

Louisville loses three scholarships

Louisville will lose three of its 25 football scholarship this year due to substandard academic progress rate (APR) scores, the school announced Friday.

The Cardinals' 2009-10 four-year APR for football for the period from 2006-10 is 908, below the minimum required mark of 925. In anticipation of the scholarship reduction, Louisville only signed 21 student-athletes in its 2011. Louisville will still be allowed its full allotment of 85 scholarship players.

"Continuity and stability among our coaching staffs lends itself to better performance and unfortunately our football student-athletes endured three football coaches in four years," UL athletic director Tom Jurich said in a statement.  "We want to improve our figures rapidly and I'm impressed with the measures Charlie Strong has implemented in our football program.  I'm confident that we are our currently headed in the right direction.  We have already addressed the penalties and have put it behind us."

Second-year head coach Charlie Strong has emphasized improving the team's APR rate and the Cardinals have already made strides.  Twenty-one of the 23 seniors who will be included in the 2010-11 APR report either have already graduated or are expected to graduate in August 2011.  In the classroom, the team's GPA has also risen over the last three semesters.

Louisville coach Charlie Strong said he will make it a priority in improving the team's APR rate. The school said 21 of the Cardinals' 23 seniors, which will be included in next year's APR report, have already graduated or are expected to graduate. Also, the team's GPA has increased in the last three semesters. 

The schools has taken several measures to improve its APR scores, including include adding academic support staff, which will provide better monitoring and support. Also more frequent progress reports will be addressed with the coaching staff and additional consequences have been established for failure to meet academic requirements.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com