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Tag:Mike Slive
Posted on: October 11, 2011 11:04 am
Edited on: October 11, 2011 11:21 am
 

Big 12 commish: league will be 10 teams in 2012

Big 12 interim commissioner Chuck Neinas said Tuesday his league will give Missouri as much time as it needs – until the end of this academic year, if necessary – to make a decision whether to remain in the Big 12 or leave for the SEC. 

“There’s no timetable,” Neinas said. “Everything is in place. We’re preparing for 2012. We’ll see what occurs.”

Neinas said he has had recent decisions with SEC commissioner Mike Slive. Neinas said he told Slive “if you’re going to extend an invitation to Missouri please let me know.” 

Neinas also said no matter what decision Missouri makes, the Big 12 would be a 10-team league in 2012 - with Missouri and new member TCU

"If Missouri is going to change horses (conferences), it won't be for 2012 anyway," Neinas said.

Whether the Big 12 eventually grows to 12 teams, there has been no decision made, Neinas said. 

“There is no consensus from conference members on going to 10 or 12 members,” Neinas said.

Neinas added there was some support last month for staying at nine teams (if Missouri left for the SEC), but that was no longer the thinking about league members. 

“The idea (with or without Missouri) would be (for the Big 12 membership) 10 or 12 teams,” Neinas said. “It won’t be 16.”

The decision to expand to 12 would have a big impact on the Big East. Sources have told CBSSports.com that Louisville is the top candidate of the Big 12 if the league adds one member and if it expands by more than one, West Virginia is another strong candidate. 

Neinas did not discuss any potential expansion candidates on Tuesday’s conference call.

He did say, however, that an Associated Press report that Missouri could make $12 million more annually in a 14-team SEC was not accurate. 

“They (a 14-team SEC) would have to increase their television revenue by $168 million,” Neinas said.

The Big 12’s interim commissioner said Missouri reacted “favorably” to the addition of TCU. He also added Texas will continue to have a nationally televised Thanksgiving game, but with Texas A&M gone to the SEC, the Longhorns’ opponent for future seasons has not been determined. It, in all likelihood, will not be against TCU, Neinas said.

Posted on: September 25, 2011 5:06 pm
Edited on: September 25, 2011 5:35 pm
 

Texas A&M to join SEC in 2012

Texas A&M will join the SEC for all sports beginning with the 2012-13 academic year, the SEC announced Sunday.

The league's Presidents and Chancellors voted unanimously to add the Aggies as their 13th member.

The next question for the SEC is who's next? Sources have indicated if Missouri does not join the league, the SEC is prepared to go through the 2012-13 season with only 13 members. If Missouri remains in the Big 12, the most likely candidates appear Virginia Tech or Florida State, CBSSports.com's Tony Barnhart reported.

Adding Texas A&M is the first expansion for the SEC since September 1991 when the University of South Carolina joined the league. Arkansas joined the SEC in August of 1991. With the addition of Arkansas and South Carolina, the SEC was the first conference to split into divisions and add a conference championship game in 1992.

“The Southeastern Conference Presidents and Chancellors are pleased to welcome Texas A&M University to the SEC family,” Dr. Bernie Machen, chair of the SEC Presidents and Chancellors and president of the University of Florida said in a statement. “The addition of Texas A&M University as the SEC’s 13th member gives our league a prestigious academic institution with a strong athletic tradition and a culture similar to our current institutions.”

Texas A&M President R. Bowen Loftin, who told CBSSports.com on Saturday, he expected any legal issues to be resolved "shortly" also issued a statement.

“The Southeastern Conference provides Texas A&M the national visibility that our great university and our student-athletes deserve,” Loftin said. “We are excited to begin competition in the nation’s premier athletic conference. This is a 100-year decision that we have addressed carefully and methodically, and I believe the Southeastern Conference gives the Aggies the best situation of any conference in the country.”

Texas A&M, located in College Station, will also be the third institution in the SEC with membership in the prestigious Association of American Universities, joining Florida and Vanderbilt. Texas A&M's 50,000 enrollment ranks as the nation's sixth-largest university, with 360,000 former students worldwide.

By moving to the SEC, Texas A&M and Texas officials have hinted this might be the last season for the rivalry between the Aggies and Longhorns.

“On behalf of our presidents, chancellors, athletics directors, students and fans, I welcome Texas A&M University to the SEC family,” SEC Commissioner Mike Slive said. “Texas A&M is a nationally-prominent institution on and off the field and a great fit for the SEC tradition of excellence—athletically, academically and culturally.”

The Aggies sponsor 20 varsity sports.  Men’s sports include baseball, basketball, football, golf, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field and cross country.  Women’s sports include basketball, equestrian, golf, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field and cross country and volleyball.  Texas A&M participates in every sport sponsored by the SEC except gymnastics and the SEC sponsors every sport the Aggies participate in except equestrian.


Posted on: September 8, 2011 9:53 pm
Edited on: September 9, 2011 1:18 am
 

OSU: Focused on Big 12, won't speculate on Pac-12

STILLWATER, Okla. – Oklahoma State President Burns Hargis told CBSSports.com Thursday his school is focused on remaining in the Big 12. However, he would not speculate on the Cowboys’ future if Texas A&M leaves the league.

“I think [the Big 12] can exist,” Hargis said. “I don’t think it’s a fait accompli A&M is gone. Obviously the SEC had a string on their bid.”

Hargis said if Texas A&M leaves, Oklahoma and Oklahoma State are “not necessarily” headed to the Pac-12. “That’s a hypothetical, but we want 10 teams [in the Big 12].”

What could push the Sooners and Cowboys to the Pac-12?

“At this point, we’re focused on the Big 12 going forward,” Hargis said before Oklahoma State’s game with, ironically, Pac-12 member Arizona. “I wouldn’t want to get into [the possibility of the Pac-12]. That’s a hypothetical and a hypothetical. It’s just not anything we’re real focused on right now.”

An Oklahoma State source told CBSSports.com that OSU would not sue Texas A&M or the SEC if Texas A&M left.

Since Texas A&M announced it was leaving the Big 12, Baylor President Ken Starr threatened to sue the SEC and Commissioner Mike Slive for tortious interference. The SEC released a statement before Starr's threat. It read in part:

“After receiving unanimous written assurance from the Big 12 on Sept. 2 that the Southeastern Conference was free to accept Texas A&M to join as a new member, the presidents and chancellors of the SEC met last night with the intention of accepting the application of Texas A&M to be the newest member of the SEC. We were notified [Tuesday] afternoon that at least one Big 12 institution had withdrawn its previous consent and was considering legal action.”

Hargis said he didn’t believe the SEC thought the conference could waive the rights of the individual institutions.

“Only the regents can waive [legal] claims of the university,” Hargis said. “The conference can’t do it, the presidents can’t do it. I think as far as conference was concerned there was no intention to take any action.”

Hargis said he wasn’t aware of a timetable when this all gets resolved. Oklahoma President David Boren estimated it would take less than three weeks.

“We’d all like to resolve it that fast but I don’t know a timetable,” Hargis said. “There’s no big rush. Everyone has to work through and get their conditions on the table and move forward.

“We have 10 really good schools. We had a close call with A&M. All of us wanted them to stay. The only ones that didn’t want them to stay was A&M, which is kind of a critical point. But hopefully maybe this event will give everyone time to take a deep breath.”



Posted on: July 28, 2011 5:50 pm
 

Big Ten supports eliminating freshmen eligibility

CHICAGO – In the past week, SEC commissioner Mike Slive and ACC commissioner John Swofford laid out some drastic proposals concerning the future of college football. On Thursday, a couple of Big Ten coaches and Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany threw their support beyond an old idea that might become new again: freshman ineligibility.

“One thing I’m for is taking away freshmen eligibility,” Nebraska's Bo Pelini said at the Big Ten’s Football Kickoff. “ I think that could be the best thing that could happen to college football and probably college basketball and athletics in general.

“It would be a tremendous move. I don’t know if there’s a lot of momentum for that. I think making freshmen ineligible would help in a multitude of different ways.”

Up until the early 1970s, freshmen were not eligible to play. Delany brought up the idea to his coaches during the Big Ten’s spring meetings.

“Taking that first year and letting them get acclimated on campus, taking pressures away of having to produce as heralded recruited players,” Iowa's Kirk Ferentz said. “I think those would be healthy for football.

“I don't know if [that’s] practical. I don't know if we can work those out. That might be a great thing that would slow the recruiting industry down too. At the end of the day it would be great for the prospects and student-athletes.”

Pelini also believes it would improve the recruiting process.

“Let’s slow this thing down a bit,” Pelini said. “Ultimately that would be one of the changes, would not only help football wise and academically, but I think it would help the recruiting process and help the sport in a number of ways.

“There’s a pretty big division what people think on that subject, but I like that idea.”

Pelini also said he’s for proposals that would increase the minimum GPA for incoming freshmen from 2.0 to 2.5 but cautions “you have to be careful you don’t limit opportunities for kids.”

Ferentz also supports increasing the GPA for incoming recruits, while LSU’s Les Miles and South Carolina’s Steve Spurrier said last week they were against higher GPAs for recruits.

“The important thing is for young people to understand at a young age when they're in high school doing well, doing well early, instead of trying to catch up the last couple years,” Ferentz said. “It's going to take a cooperative effort from a lot of different folks.”

Posted on: July 22, 2011 12:53 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 3:28 pm
 

Miles discusses LSU's use of recruiting services

HOOVER, Ala. – LSU coach Les Miles, whose school is under NCAA investigation for its dealings with Willie Lyles, said he uses recruiting services primarily for the video services they provide.

“We use XOS, it does just a tremendous body of work,” Miles said Friday. “We certainly want to cover the country. We have to have film video of prospects really across the country. We feel like there are certain areas we need to cover in other years more and certainly we want to recruit from Houston through to Florida. We’re going to hit those things hard absolutely.

“Certain years we’re going to be interested in junior colleges, but the point being you get it done, you get [the video] just as efficiently as you can and you study it. That’s how we’re going to recruit.

“There’s really nothing else a service can provide us other than video.”

Miles said he was prohibited from talking about Lyles and said the school was fully cooperating with the NCAA.

LSU paid $6,000 for Lyles’ junior college package. Oregon paid $25,000 and Cal $5,00 for Lyles’ recruiting services, which have been exposed as incomplete and fraudulent.

Miles, in his initial interview session at SEC Media Days, was asked about SEC commissioner Mike Slive’s proposed changes, including multi-year scholarships and increasing the GPA for incoming freshman from 2.0 to 2.5.

“There always will be change,” Miles said. “There’s a positive piece there. I think cost of attendance is a wonderful piece. I think [Slive] brings to light a multi-year scholarship that could be [extended to] six years. In my opinion anything that extends the timeline to allow our guys to graduate is a very good thing.”

Miles wasn’t as agreeable with the increased GPA. He believes colleges shouldn’t be “elitist” and said college was a place individuals “learn to develop.”

“I might see the 2.5 [GPA] in a freshman year before he plays as a real issue,” Miles said. “I got a degree in economics from a very prestigious institution [Michigan]. I can’t tell you when I achieved a 2.5, I hope I have. So that may have prohibited me from taking snaps – other than my lack of talent.”

Also, an LSU spokesman said that WR Russell Shepard has not been suspended. Shepard was scheduled to attend media days, but was replaced. Miles said Shepard had some personal issues he had to resolve in Baton Rouge, La., but would not elaborate.
Posted on: July 21, 2011 5:06 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2011 5:37 pm
 

Dooley says inequality in football 'fun'

HOOVER, Ala. – Tennessee coach Derek Dooley was asked Thursday about SEC commissioner Mike Slive’s proposal to provide multi-year scholarships and the possibility of a conference-wide discipline policy.

But when Dooley was finished answering the question, he gave some insight into the inequality between the automatic qualifying BCS schools and non-BSC schools.

And Dooley shed some light into the difference between the BCS and non-BCS schools and why a lot of folks, including BYU coach Bronco Mendenhall, believe there will be a split within the FBS ranks.

“It goes back to what you believe philosophically,” Dooley said. “Are we going to allow the institutions and programs to set their rules, then allow the market to handle which way they go and the success they have or are we going to take over and define what everybody does all the time?

“I think it’s absurd to have across-the-board disciplinary measures when you’re talking about dealing with young people.”

Dooley wasn’t finished.

“Otherwise what we need to do is get off the campuses and form us a little college league like the NFL if we’re going to go in that direction,” Dooley said. “Then it’s one group. We represent the college football league, not the school. We’re all the same. We all wear the same sideline gear except the color of everything. It’s all uniform.

“That’s what makes college unique. We got programs that have $100 million competing with programs that have $10 million. That’s not level. That’s just the way it is. I think that’s a unique thing, fun. Makes great fodder for the fans, brings pride to the institution because of their uniqueness.

“I don’t think that’s something we should be ashamed of.”



Posted on: July 20, 2011 3:00 pm
 

Slive says you can win without cheating

HOOVER, Ala. – In the past two weeks, CBSSports.com has reported in depth on cheating in college athletics. And even since the series began three more schools – West Virginia, Georgia Tech and LSU – have received major NCAA sanctions.

So I posed the question Wednesday to SEC commissioner Mike Slive that our series sought out to answer: Can you win in college football these days without cheating?

The commissioner’s answer: “Yes.”

“There’s a tendency to overstate – if there’s a school on probation for phone calls or text messaging, you’re going to lump that in with another school who might had done something very different,” Slive said.

“We need to figure out what we really want to stop and go from there.”

In the past 25 years, SEC programs have committed the most NCAA major infractions of any conference. Since 1987, every SEC football program, except for Vanderbilt, has received a major infraction.

SEC football programs are hardly the only guilty parties. Since 1987, only 21 of the 67 automatic qualifying BCS conference schools have not committed a major infraction. That number likely will reduce to 20 after the NCAA rules on the various allegations concerning North Carolina.


Posted on: June 1, 2011 4:57 pm
Edited on: June 1, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Spurrier wants players to receive $300 a game

DESTIN, Fla. – South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier said he was battling laryngitis so he had to speak softly. His message, though, was loud and clear: football players should receive financial compensation.

At Wednesday’s SEC spring meetings, Spurrier presented a proposal that league coaches – out of their own pockets – provide $300 a game to its players. The money would be for game expenses.

“They can give to their parents for travel, lodging, meals,” Spurrier said. “Maybe they could take their girlfriends out Saturday night and so forth.”

Spurrier said six other coaches signed his proposal: Alabama’s Nick Saban, Florida’s Will Muschamp, Ole Miss’ Houston Nutt, Mississippi State’s Dan Mullen, LSU’s Les Miles and Tennessee’s Derek Dooley.

“A bunch of us coaches felt so strongly about it we would be willing to pay 70 guys 300 bucks a game,” Spurrier said. “That’s only $21,000 a game. I doubt it will get passed, but as the coaches in the SEC we make all the money as do the universities with television [deals]. And we need to give more to our players. That was something we need to get out there.”

The five coaches who didn’t sign Spurrier’s proposal: Arkansas’ Bobby Petrino, Auburn’s Gene Chizik, Georgia’s Mark Richt, Kentucky’s Joker Phillips and Vanderbilt’s James Franklin.

"I told the other coaches Im going to tell the media what coaches wouldn't sign," Spurrier said.

SEC commissioner Mike Slive said it was doubtful Spurrier’s proposal could ever get passed.

"I don't think [it would pass],” Slive said. “It was a gesture by Steve, thinking about student athlete welfare.”

Spurrier said he’s felt this way for years, especially how much money is made in college athletics by the universities and coaches.

“I just wish there was a way to give our players a little bit piece of the pie,” Spurrier said. “It’s so huge right now. As you know 50 years ago there was not any kind of money and the players got full scholarships. Now they’re still getting full scholarships and the money in the millions.

“I don’t know how to get it done. Hopefully there’s a way to get our guys that play football, a little piece of the pie. The coaches make so much, we ‘d be willing to pay it so there’s no additional expense to the university or anybody.”

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com