Tag:Sugar Bowl
Posted on: August 17, 2011 7:42 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 8:34 pm
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Fiesta Bowl likely on the move - to Jan. 2, 2012

The Fiesta Bowl likely is moving – to another date.

The game could be moved up three days to Monday, Jan. 2, 2012 at 8:30 ET, sources told CBSSports.com.

Because of the uncertainty of the NFL lockout earlier this summer, the BCS only scheduled the Rose Bowl on Monday, Jan. 2, 2010 (5 p.m. ET) and didn’t schedule a game that night in case the NFL regular season schedule was pushed back a week and was required to play that night.

However, with the lockout settled and the NFL regular season schedule remaining the same – it ends on Jan. 1, 2012 – the Sugar, Orange and Fiesta bowls were given the opportunity by the BCS to move one of their games up to Monday night, Jan. 2.

The Sugar, which also hosts the BCS title game on Jan. 9, 2012, had the first opportunity but decided to remain on its original date of Jan. 3, 2012. The Orange also turned down an opportunity to move off Jan. 4, 2012.

The Fiesta Bowl, originally scheduled for Jan. 5, 2012, wants to make the move to Jan. 2, 2012, because it would draw higher television ratings by having a Rose Bowl lead-in game compared with playing on a Thursday night. Also since Jan. 2, 2012 is recognized as a holiday, it would be more easier for visiting fans to attend.

A Fiesta Bowl spokesman declined comment on the expected move.

The Arizona Republic reported the holdup whether the Fiesta Bowl will be moved depends on if the NFL's Arizona Cardinals, who host the Seattle Seahawks on Jan. 1, will waive part of its stadium rights for crews to transform the stadium immediately after the game for the Fiesta Bowl. A Cardinals spokesman said told the Republic the Cardinals want to explore ways to make it happen. The NFL game is now scheduled for 4:15 p.m. ET at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Ariz.

Ironically, all three BCS bowl games that had the option to move also are hosting NFL games on Jan. 1. The N.Y. Jets play at Miami at Sun Life Stadium, Carolina visits New Orleans in the Louisiana Superdome and the Seahawks play the Cardinals in Glendale.

Here is the BCS bowl schedule if the Fiesta Bowl moves as expected:

Monday, Jan. 2, 2012–Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., 5 p.m. ET
Monday, Jan. 2, 2012–Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Ariz., 8:30 p.m. ET
Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012–Sugar Bowl in New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. ET
Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2012–Orange Bowl in Miami Gardens, 8 p.m. ET
Monday, Jan. 9, 2012–BCS title game in New Orleans, 8:30 p.m. ET




Posted on: July 8, 2011 5:24 pm
 

Ohio State's penalties won't be financial

By playing in the Sugar Bowl, Ohio State earned the Big Ten Conference $6 million as the league’s second BCS bowl team. And Ohio State and the league will keep every penny since the BCS has no power to impose any financial penalties on the Buckeyes.

“The BCS is not a governance body nor an investigative body,” BCS executive director Bill Hancock told CBSSports.com. “Policy is that the BCS group would act only at the conclusion of the NCAA process, and only if the NCAA returns findings.”

On Friday, Ohio State vacated all of its 2010 victories, including the 31-26 win against Arkansas, and put itself on two years probation. Jim Tressel, who covered up and lied about multiple NCAA violations, left the school on May 30. A handful of players have been suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season (but were allowed by the NCAA to play in the Sugar Bowl).

Ohio State will go before the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions next month. Further penalties are possible – just not financial ones.

The NCAA Committee on Infractions cannot withhold bowl money from a football program for committing major NCAA violations.

"The key here is unlike NCAA championships, where if you have to vacate a Final Four [appearance], the Committee on Infractions and NCAA can mandate that you as an institution return monies to the NCAA,” said Joe D’Antonio, the Big East’s senior associate commissioner for compliance. “The BCS is not controlled by the NCAA. Consequently the Committee on Infractions cannot impose those types of [financial] penalties.”



Posted on: May 31, 2011 9:51 pm
Edited on: May 31, 2011 10:50 pm
 

Petrino: NCAA changed its rules for Sugar Bowl

DESTIN, Fla. – Ohio State 31, Arkansas 26.

Not many individuals outside of Arkansas and Ohio remember the score from last season’s Sugar Bowl, but nearly everyone remembers that six Buckeyes were allowed to play in the contest after the NCAA determined they received improper benefits. The NCAA permitted them to play and delayed the player’s suspensions until this fall.

Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino was asked at Tuesday's SEC spring meetings about the Ohio State game and “should you have been playing a different team or have you let it go?”

“We wanted to play their best players,” Petrino said. “When you have a year like we had … and get to a BCS bowl game, you want to play their best players. That’s what you want to do.

“There’s no question that I don’t understand how they were eligible to play in the game. I just don’t and I never will.”

SEC commissioner Mike Slive, when told about Petrino’s comments, responded: “I can understand his position.”

Slive also was asked if he had ever seen a situation before where ineligible players were allowed to play and their suspensions delayed.

"I don't remember one," Slive said.   

Petrino related a situation when he coaching Louisville. He said two of his players were suspended after spending more than their allotted per diem on food because they were stranded in Newport, R.I., following the Big East’s media days. The punishment for the Louisville players was immediate, while, obviously, the OSU players had theirs suspensions postponed allowing them to play in the Sugar Bowl.

“I think they [the NCAA] kind of changed the rules for that bowl game,” Petrino said.

Petrino said he wasn’t surprised by the resignation of Ohio State coach Jim Tressel

“I can’t say I was surprised but I feel for him,” Petrino said. “When something like that happens you never like to see it. I feel for him, his family. It affects a lot of other people in the state and the university, so you feel for all those people.

“There are lessons to be learned from that, no question. One of the talks I have with my players is football is a game of courage. One of the lessons we always talk about is take the arrow in the forehead – which means tell the truth.

“Don’t be trying to blame things on your teammate next you. You have to be able to tell the truth with all your relationships with your professors, your girlfriend. … when it came out [Tressel] was dishonest with the NCAA you kind of knew it was going to spin a lot more.”

 
 
 
 
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