Tag:Memphis
Posted on: December 7, 2011 4:41 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 6:03 pm
 

C-USA, Mountain West all-sports merger on horizon

NEW YORK – With the Mountain West and Conference USA losing at least five members to the Big East, those two leagues are now looking at an all-sports merger instead of a full-scale football expansion as originally planned, sources told CBSSports.com.

Conference USA and the Mountain West initially planned to combine into a separate football-only league with between 20 and 24 members and conducted an Oct. 15 press conference to announce the news. The winners from C-USA and the Mountain West would meet in a playoff with, they hoped, the winner earning a BCS bowl berth.

A BCS bowl berth, however, would have had to be approved by the BCS.

However, that plan has lost steam by the loss of Boise State, San Diego State, Houston, SMU and UCF to the Big East. Instead, C-USA and the Mountain West are considering a merger in all sports. Sources have indicated that Craig Thompson, the current commissioner of the Mountain West, would become the commissioner of the new merged league, while Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowsky would step down.

A vote on the merger could come by next month, sources said.

The merged league would consist of: East Carolina, Marshall, Memphis, Rice, Southern Miss, Tulane, Tulsa, UAB and UTEP from C-USA and Air Force, Colorado State, New Mexico, UNLV and Wyoming from the Mountain West along with new members Fresno State, Hawaii and Nevada for a 17-team conference. Air Force was being sought after by the Big East, but the Gazette reported Tuesday evening that the Falcons would remain in the Mountain West.

After the initial merger announcement to as many as 24 schools on Oct. 15, Banowsky e-mailed officials at Conference USA and the Mountain West a week later about a proposed new conference, entitled “BCS and The Big East Expansion (An Alternative Plan).”

“Attached is a document that might find of interest regarding conference realignment,” Banowsky wrote on the e-mail, obtained by CBSSports.com.

That eight-page document presented two possible conferences mergers: one with 28 teams and another with 32 teams. They included all the Big East, Conference USA and Mountain West teams, plus a few other teams from other leagues. The plan was never endorsed by the Big East and didn’t get much further than being reported by various media outlets.

To combat the departures of the five schools, the Mountain West had decided to add San Jose State and Utah State. But adding those schools has now been put on hold, sources said.

Posted on: September 1, 2011 6:09 pm
Edited on: September 1, 2011 6:28 pm
 

Mississippi State suspends 5 players vs. Memphis

Mississippi State suspended five players, including starting DT Fletcher Cox, for Thursday night's game at Memphis for violating team rules, the school announced.

The other suspended players were freshman LT Blaine Clausell, who was listed as a co-starter at left tackle, Dylan Favre, Chris Hughes and Malcolm Johnson.

Favre was listed as the Bulldogs' back-up quarterback. Hughes, a sophomore linebacker, and Johnson, a freshman wide receiver, are not listed on MSU's two-deep.

All five players are expected to return for the Bulldogs' next game, Sept. 10 at Auburn, a MSU spokesperson said.



Posted on: July 8, 2011 1:05 pm
Edited on: July 8, 2011 1:19 pm
 

Presenting NCAA's most frequent cheaters club

As our series on college football’s cheaters continues today, I looked at the most frequent cheaters – at least in terms of major infractions – since SMU received the Death Penalty in 1987.

It’s a neck-and-neck race between Alabama and Texas Tech, with three major infractions each.

There are also a dozen teams – Cal, Colorado, Florida International, Florida State, Illinois, Minnesota, Mississippi State, Oklahoma, SMU, Texas A&M, USC and Washington – with two infractions each

Here are the remaining 42 teams with one major infraction each: Arkansas, Arkansas State, Arizona State, Auburn, Ball State, Baylor, Central Florida, Cincinnati, Clemson, Florida, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Houston, Kansas, Kansas State, Kentucky, Louisiana Lafayette, Marshall, Maryland, Memphis, Miami, Michigan, Michigan State, Mississippi, New Mexico, Notre Dame, Ohio State, Oklahoma State, Oregon, Pittsburgh, Rutgers, San Diego State, South Carolina, Syracuse, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, UTEP, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Washington State and Wisconsin.

In all 56 of the 120 FBS programs have committed a major infraction in the past 25 years, including nearly two-thirds of the automatic qualifying BCS programs.

By the way, I loved a response on Twitter from @FGrimes1 – listed as Forrest Grimes – defending Texas Tech’s three major infractions. He wrote: “Most of Techs major infractions came around the same time, way to make Tech look like a contuinously dirty program a--hole."

For Mr. Grimes’ information, Tech’s violations were not at the same time – but spaced more than 10 years apart in 1987, 1998 and on Jan. 7, 2011 – during Grimes’ current semester as a journalism major at Tech

While our two-week series is looking at whether schools can win without cheating, I think it’s important to recognize the 23 AQ BCS programs that have not committed a major infraction since 1987 … so far.

ACC–Boston College, Duke, North Carolina, N.C. State, Wake Forest.
Big East–UConn, Louisville, South Florida, West Virginia.
Big Ten–Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, Purdue.
Big 12–Iowa State, Missouri.
Pac-12–Arizona, Oregon State, Stanford, UCLA.
SEC–LSU, Vanderbilt


Posted on: June 17, 2011 4:24 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2011 4:45 pm
 

Schools: NCAA's APR data for coaches not fair

Charlie Strong was hired at Louisville on Dec. 9, 2009. So he obviously did not coach the Cardinals during the 2009-10 season. But don’t tell the NCAA that, because according to how the NCAA computes the Academic Progress Rate (APR) scores, Strong was just as responsible for the Cardinals’ low APR score as former coach Steve Kragthorpe.

Because Strong was at the school during the 2009-10 school year, the NCAA gives Strong and Kragthorpe equal credit for the Cardinals’ APR score that year.

UL’s 869 APR out of 1,000 was the worst APR score among the 120 Football Bowl Subdivision schools in 2009-10.

In Wednesday’s study of the APR averages of the FBS coaches by CBSSports.com, I used the data provided by the NCAA. The coaches year-by-year APR scores are available on the NCAA’s website, if you want to check it out for yourself.

At least two schools – Louisville and UCF – believe the way the NCAA calculates the APR scores for coaches is not fair and misleading. Louisville believes Strong should not be saddled with the 2009-10 score of 869 - the school expects the 2010-11 APR to be significantly better.

UCF also believes Coach George O’Leary should not be credited with the 880 from the 2003-04 year because O’Leary was hired at UCF on Dec. 8, 2003.

UCF felt strongly enough about how the NCAA calculates the coaches APR scores, the school posted a story on its website following the CBSSports.com study. UCF's story did not include O'Leary's 2003-04 880 APR score. Louisville officials prefered not to comment for this story.

Based on the NCAA’s data, Strong ranked as the coach with the worst APR in FBS. Three other coaches that had the nation’s seven-worst coaching APRs – Akron’s Rob Ianello (900), Memphis’ Larry Porter (903) and Buffalo’s Jeff Quinn (918) – also were credited for a dismal APR score even though they arrived after that football season had been completed.

I e-mailed NCAA spokesman Eric Christianson Thursday, asking for an explanation why the NCAA computes the APR’s of the coaches that way. When I receive a response, I will let you know.



 
 
 
 
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