Tag:Ohio State
Posted on: June 1, 2011 12:48 pm
Edited on: June 1, 2011 2:09 pm
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Tressel "caught holding smoking gun in his hand"

Former Ohio State quarterback Craig Krenzel told Todd Wright of Sporting News Radio that the situation concerning the Buckeyes’ football program is embarrassing and disgusting.

“Coach [Jim] Tressel has to look in the mirror,” Krenzel said. “He has to hang his hat on it. Our football coach got caught holding a smoking gun in his hand.”

Speaking on Todd Wright Tonight, Krenzel told Wright his immediate reaction when Tressel announced his resignation Monday “was surprise, but I wouldn’t say it was shock.”

“The person I had the opportunity to spend a lot of time with was not the man that people see right now.”

Krenzel, the last quarterback to lead the Buckeyes to a national title in 2002, said after reading the various reports about the allegations surrounding the program showed Tressel in a different light.

“He was obviously flawed,” Krenzel said. “Maybe he wasn’t as good or perfect, especially that Buckeyes fans wanted him to be or pictured him to be.”

Krenzel said he didn’t think Ohio State fans were necessarily angry at Tressel or quarterback Terrelle Pryor.

“I think it’s more disgusted,” Krenzel said. “People are disgusted, disappointed. Frankly we’re embarrassed by it more than anything.”

Krenzel said the current players deserve blame for what has happened.

“It’s a different generation,” Krenzel said. “What was a great opportunity at Ohio State … that’s all been forgotten. In my opinion, it’s turned into coming in as a freshman [and thinking] ‘what can I get?’ It’s disappointing to see all around the country, not just Ohio State, what college football is turning into.

“Guys come in with this sense of entitlement and a screwed up set of priorities. Part of the blame is on them.”

Krenzel said he doesn’t believe any more allegations will surface at Ohio State, but that doesn’t make the future outlook any better.

“I do think it is going to get worse,” Krenzel said. “This situation is ugly and it’s going to get uglier.”

Posted on: May 31, 2011 9:51 pm
Edited on: May 31, 2011 10:50 pm
 

Petrino: NCAA changed its rules for Sugar Bowl

DESTIN, Fla. – Ohio State 31, Arkansas 26.

Not many individuals outside of Arkansas and Ohio remember the score from last season’s Sugar Bowl, but nearly everyone remembers that six Buckeyes were allowed to play in the contest after the NCAA determined they received improper benefits. The NCAA permitted them to play and delayed the player’s suspensions until this fall.

Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino was asked at Tuesday's SEC spring meetings about the Ohio State game and “should you have been playing a different team or have you let it go?”

“We wanted to play their best players,” Petrino said. “When you have a year like we had … and get to a BCS bowl game, you want to play their best players. That’s what you want to do.

“There’s no question that I don’t understand how they were eligible to play in the game. I just don’t and I never will.”

SEC commissioner Mike Slive, when told about Petrino’s comments, responded: “I can understand his position.”

Slive also was asked if he had ever seen a situation before where ineligible players were allowed to play and their suspensions delayed.

"I don't remember one," Slive said.   

Petrino related a situation when he coaching Louisville. He said two of his players were suspended after spending more than their allotted per diem on food because they were stranded in Newport, R.I., following the Big East’s media days. The punishment for the Louisville players was immediate, while, obviously, the OSU players had theirs suspensions postponed allowing them to play in the Sugar Bowl.

“I think they [the NCAA] kind of changed the rules for that bowl game,” Petrino said.

Petrino said he wasn’t surprised by the resignation of Ohio State coach Jim Tressel

“I can’t say I was surprised but I feel for him,” Petrino said. “When something like that happens you never like to see it. I feel for him, his family. It affects a lot of other people in the state and the university, so you feel for all those people.

“There are lessons to be learned from that, no question. One of the talks I have with my players is football is a game of courage. One of the lessons we always talk about is take the arrow in the forehead – which means tell the truth.

“Don’t be trying to blame things on your teammate next you. You have to be able to tell the truth with all your relationships with your professors, your girlfriend. … when it came out [Tressel] was dishonest with the NCAA you kind of knew it was going to spin a lot more.”

 
 
 
 
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