Tag:SEC
Posted on: September 3, 2011 1:48 pm
 

Oklahoma State's thoughts on Big 12 future

Oklahoma State President Burns Hargis released a statement Saturday regarding Big 12 Conference discussions.

"We want to be clear that we worked actively to encourage Texas A&M to remain in the Big 12 Conference and regret they decided to leave," Hargis said. "We are moving ahead.

"Oklahoma State University's athletic program has never been stronger from top to bottom, putting us in a position to explore and pursue options, including the possible expansion of our current conference. We are in close communications with our colleagues at the University of Oklahoma and expect a decision soon that will be in the best interest of our institutions and the state of Oklahoma."

In other words, if Oklahoma is leaving to the Pac-12/16, Oklahoma State fully expects to go with them.

Hargis' statement comes a day after Oklahoma President David Boren said the Sooners had been contacted by multiple conferences and that the Sooners were not "going to be a wallflower when all is said and done."

Like Hargis, Boren said he tried to prevent Texas A&M from leaving the Big 12. The Aggies are expected to join the SEC.

Boren said the Sooners expect to decide whether to leave in three weeks. He said he flew to Missouri to confer with chancellor Brady Deaton,the chairman of the Big 12 board of directors, and to College Station, Texas, to try to prevent Texas A&M from leaving for the SEC.

Oklahoma was offered chances to join both the Pac-10 and the SEC last year, but decided to stick with the Big 12, even as Nebraska left to join the Big Ten and Colorado joined the Pac-10, now the Pac-12.

"Of course, we have some great partners in the existing Big 12," Boren said. "We have interest from other conferences and other universities, so it's really a tribute to the strength of our program at the University of Oklahoma that there is so much interest in us.

"So, we have to carefully evaluate the various comments that are being made to us and the various possibilities that are being shown to us before we decide what's best for the university to do."


Posted on: August 17, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 1:36 pm
 

Emmert: no conference realignment summit

After NCAA president Mark Emmert read erroneous media reports that he planned to have a summit on conference realignment, he emailed several officials throughout intercollegiate athletics to clarify no meetings would take place.

CBSSports.com obtained the document Emmert sent out.

"I have been and will continue to engage individual presidents and commissioners about the reform effort that was launched last week as part of the Division I presidential retreat," Emmert wrote. "In that context, all constituents have been involved in meaningful discussion on how best to conduct our business, including conference realignments, in the best interests of student-athletes. Open and frank discussion is needed to ensure expected reforms are not derailed in any way. However, I have not proposed, nor do I have plans to propose a summit on conference realignment as recently reported by several media outlets. Such reports are simply in error."

Getting all the key players from the SEC, Big 12, Pac-12, Big Ten, ACC and Big East conferences together to discuss conference realignment would seem like a good idea for the future of college athletics. But an NCAA spokesman said that was never a consideration.

"Conference affilations are the purview of the conferences not the NCAA," said Bob Williams, the NCAA's vice president of communications.

I asked Williams if there also were legal reasons why Emmert wouldn't meet with the BCS conference commissioners.

"Antitrust is always an issue," he said.

Posted on: August 13, 2011 5:16 pm
Edited on: August 15, 2011 11:57 am
 

BYU, Louisville say they're happy where they are

NOTE: This is an update from an earlier post on BYU and Louisville.

If - or when - the Big 12 starts seeking a replacement for Texas A&M, at least two possible candidates told CBSSports.com they are happy with their current situations.

BYU, which left the Mountain West last season to become an independent, plans to remain an independent, while Louisville is happy to remain in the Big East. That, of course, could change if either school receives an invitation to join the Big 12. Both schools have been speculated as possible targets of the Big 12 if Texas A&M leaves for the SEC.

"We have not been contacted by anybody," BYU athletic director Tom Holmoe said. "We are very happy with our partnerships and relationships with ESPN, BYUtv and the West Coast Conference [in BYU's Olympic sports.]

"We like the plans we have made as an independent in football and with the West Coast Conference. We are moving forward fast on that path and getting ready for a big season."

Louisville athletic director Tom Jurich said the Cardinals are excited about the future of the Big East.

The league recently turned down a nine-year, $1.4 billion media rights deal from ESPN and is line for an even bigger deal in the next couple years from ESPN, NBC/Comcast or Fox.

"We are very happy where we are," Jurich said.

Neither Holmoe or Jurich would address any other conferences. I also asked Holmoe how committed BYU was to being an independent. "Just focusing in on what could be an exciting year for Cougar football," he said.

One official at a BCS conference, that could be affected by Texas A&M's move to the SEC and the resulting dominos, said Saturday he had not heard of any new developments.

"The only news is whatever your colleagues make up," he said jokingly.
Category: NCAAF
Posted on: August 11, 2011 3:51 pm
Edited on: August 11, 2011 4:02 pm
 

17 football schools wouldn't have met APR minimum

With the NCAA’s Division 1 Board of Directors decision on Thursday to increase the average four-year APR score to 930 in order to be able to participate in the NCAA basketball tournament and bowl games, 17 of the Football Bowl Subdivision schools would not have met the APR requirement in the 2009-10 season.

Here are the football programs by conference that did not have a 930 APR in 2009-10:

ACC – Maryland, N.C. State
Big East – Louisville
Big Ten – Michigan
Pac-12 – Colorado, Washington State
Conference USA – UAB, Houston, Southern Miss, Tulsa, UTEP
Independent – Brigham Young
Mid-American – Akron
Sun Belt – Florida Atlantic, Louisiana-Monroe
WAC – Idaho, New Mexico State

Each school from the Big 12, SEC and Mountain West had at least a 930 APR.

Of the 17 schools with sub 930 APRs, eight played in bowl games last season – Maryland, N.C. State, Louisville, Michigan, Southern Miss, Tulsa, UTEP and BYU.

If the 930 APR requirement was in place, the Beef O' Brady's St. Petersburg Bowl (Louisville vs. Southern Miss) and New Mexico Bowl (BYU vs. UTEP) would have been seeking additional teams since their four schools would not have qualified.



Posted on: July 22, 2011 12:53 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 3:28 pm
 

Miles discusses LSU's use of recruiting services

HOOVER, Ala. – LSU coach Les Miles, whose school is under NCAA investigation for its dealings with Willie Lyles, said he uses recruiting services primarily for the video services they provide.

“We use XOS, it does just a tremendous body of work,” Miles said Friday. “We certainly want to cover the country. We have to have film video of prospects really across the country. We feel like there are certain areas we need to cover in other years more and certainly we want to recruit from Houston through to Florida. We’re going to hit those things hard absolutely.

“Certain years we’re going to be interested in junior colleges, but the point being you get it done, you get [the video] just as efficiently as you can and you study it. That’s how we’re going to recruit.

“There’s really nothing else a service can provide us other than video.”

Miles said he was prohibited from talking about Lyles and said the school was fully cooperating with the NCAA.

LSU paid $6,000 for Lyles’ junior college package. Oregon paid $25,000 and Cal $5,00 for Lyles’ recruiting services, which have been exposed as incomplete and fraudulent.

Miles, in his initial interview session at SEC Media Days, was asked about SEC commissioner Mike Slive’s proposed changes, including multi-year scholarships and increasing the GPA for incoming freshman from 2.0 to 2.5.

“There always will be change,” Miles said. “There’s a positive piece there. I think cost of attendance is a wonderful piece. I think [Slive] brings to light a multi-year scholarship that could be [extended to] six years. In my opinion anything that extends the timeline to allow our guys to graduate is a very good thing.”

Miles wasn’t as agreeable with the increased GPA. He believes colleges shouldn’t be “elitist” and said college was a place individuals “learn to develop.”

“I might see the 2.5 [GPA] in a freshman year before he plays as a real issue,” Miles said. “I got a degree in economics from a very prestigious institution [Michigan]. I can’t tell you when I achieved a 2.5, I hope I have. So that may have prohibited me from taking snaps – other than my lack of talent.”

Also, an LSU spokesman said that WR Russell Shepard has not been suspended. Shepard was scheduled to attend media days, but was replaced. Miles said Shepard had some personal issues he had to resolve in Baton Rouge, La., but would not elaborate.
Posted on: July 21, 2011 5:06 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2011 5:37 pm
 

Dooley says inequality in football 'fun'

HOOVER, Ala. – Tennessee coach Derek Dooley was asked Thursday about SEC commissioner Mike Slive’s proposal to provide multi-year scholarships and the possibility of a conference-wide discipline policy.

But when Dooley was finished answering the question, he gave some insight into the inequality between the automatic qualifying BCS schools and non-BSC schools.

And Dooley shed some light into the difference between the BCS and non-BCS schools and why a lot of folks, including BYU coach Bronco Mendenhall, believe there will be a split within the FBS ranks.

“It goes back to what you believe philosophically,” Dooley said. “Are we going to allow the institutions and programs to set their rules, then allow the market to handle which way they go and the success they have or are we going to take over and define what everybody does all the time?

“I think it’s absurd to have across-the-board disciplinary measures when you’re talking about dealing with young people.”

Dooley wasn’t finished.

“Otherwise what we need to do is get off the campuses and form us a little college league like the NFL if we’re going to go in that direction,” Dooley said. “Then it’s one group. We represent the college football league, not the school. We’re all the same. We all wear the same sideline gear except the color of everything. It’s all uniform.

“That’s what makes college unique. We got programs that have $100 million competing with programs that have $10 million. That’s not level. That’s just the way it is. I think that’s a unique thing, fun. Makes great fodder for the fans, brings pride to the institution because of their uniqueness.

“I don’t think that’s something we should be ashamed of.”



Posted on: July 20, 2011 3:00 pm
 

Slive says you can win without cheating

HOOVER, Ala. – In the past two weeks, CBSSports.com has reported in depth on cheating in college athletics. And even since the series began three more schools – West Virginia, Georgia Tech and LSU – have received major NCAA sanctions.

So I posed the question Wednesday to SEC commissioner Mike Slive that our series sought out to answer: Can you win in college football these days without cheating?

The commissioner’s answer: “Yes.”

“There’s a tendency to overstate – if there’s a school on probation for phone calls or text messaging, you’re going to lump that in with another school who might had done something very different,” Slive said.

“We need to figure out what we really want to stop and go from there.”

In the past 25 years, SEC programs have committed the most NCAA major infractions of any conference. Since 1987, every SEC football program, except for Vanderbilt, has received a major infraction.

SEC football programs are hardly the only guilty parties. Since 1987, only 21 of the 67 automatic qualifying BCS conference schools have not committed a major infraction. That number likely will reduce to 20 after the NCAA rules on the various allegations concerning North Carolina.


Posted on: June 20, 2011 9:42 pm
Edited on: June 21, 2011 8:52 am
 

How Big East deal would have compared to others

One billion dollars. That's what the Big East turned down from ESPN last month, sources told CBSSports.com. Of course that doesn't mean the league won't get the same offer - or more - from ESPN, NBC/Comcast or Fox in the next several months.

The offer on the table, though, was a good one. Sources said ESPN offered to extend its current deal with the league for nine years at between $110 million to $130 million annually, or about a $1 billion for the entire deal. That would have drawn the Big East a lot closer to the other AQ BCS leagues and locked them up through the 2022-23 school year.

"Whatever that gap is [between the Big East and other five AQ BCS leagues], it would have been as small [a difference to the others] as possible," a college football industry source told CBSSports.com. "You [the Big East] don't want to be so far in the rear view mirror that you're not connected with the other five."

Here's how the Big East's proposed deal would have stacked up with the other big boys. Of course, remember these deals represent different lengths of contracts and also a different membership size, so it's not necessarily an apples-to-apples comparison as far as per school value. But it would have put the Big East in the same neighborhood.

Big East offer: $990,000 to $1.17 billion over nine years from ESPN/ABC
ACC:
$1.86 billion from ESPN/ABC over 12 years
Big 12: $1.1 billion from Fox over 13 years, $480 million from ESPN/ABC for eight years. This does not include Texas' $15 million from ESPN for its Longhorn Network.
Big Ten: $2.8 billion from Big Ten Network for 25 years, $1 billion from ESPN/ABC through 2016
SEC: $2.25 billion from ESPN for 15 years, $825 billion from CBS for 15 years
Pac-12: $3 billion from ESPN and Fox for 12 years



Category: NCAAF
 
 
 
 
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