Tag:Louisville
Posted on: July 13, 2011 1:30 pm
 

Another one bites the NCAA infractions dust

And then there were 73.

For the past two weeks, CBSSports.com has been reporting on various elements involved with cheating in college football.

During the series, we had referenced that there had been 72 major violations at 56 schools since SMU received the Death Penalty in 1987.

Well, it’s now up to 73 major infractions and 57 schools after West Virginia's July 8 violations, stemming from failure to monitor charges against former coaches Rich Rodriguez and Bill Stewart, are now included in the database of NCAA infractions.

West Virginia had been one of 23 automatic qualifying BCS conference teams that had not committed a major violation since 1987, so now that number is reduced to 22. That also means 45 of the 67 AQ BCS schools - 67.1 percent of the schools from the six power conferences.

The final and fifth installment of our series is Friday, so it’s doubtful the NCAA would rule on any major infractions before then. But, then again, you never know.

Here’s the updated list of the 22 AQ football programs without a major infraction since 1987:

ACC–Boston College, Duke, North Carolina, N.C. State, Wake Forest.
Big East–UConn, Louisville, South Florida.
Big Ten–Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Northwestern, Penn State, Purdue.
Big 12–Iowa State, Missouri.
Pac-12–Arizona, Oregon State, Stanford, UCLA.
SEC–LSU, Vanderbilt.


Posted on: June 23, 2011 5:01 pm
Edited on: June 24, 2011 12:13 pm
 

Who survives among the not so Fab 5?

CBSSports.com’s Dennis Dodd unveiled his annual Hot Seat Ratings for all 120 FBS coaches today. Here’s a look at his complete ratings, with coaches rated from 0 (untouchable) to 5 (scorching).

We have good news for 115 coaches: you received lower than a 4-rating on Dodd’s hot scale and while that’s not a guarantee you’ll be coaching next fall, your odds are a lot better than the remaining five.

Those other five coaches – Washington State’s Paul Wulff, New Mexico’s Mike Locksley, UCLA’s Rick Neuheisel, Tulane’s Bob Toledo and Illinois’ Ron Zook – might want to turn up their AC units. They received between a 4 or 5 rating: 4-4.5 is “Warm seat – feeling the pressure” and 5 is “On the hot seat – it’s time to win now.”

Looking back at Dodd’s Hot Seat Ratings for the past three seasons, he has given 19 coaches between a 4 and 5 rating. Of those coaches, 13 of 19 – or 68.4 percent – were fired before the next season.

Dodd also has only handed out the dreaded 5 rating to five coaches and four of the five were fired that season – Louisville’s Steve Kragthorpe (2009), North Texas’ Todd Dodge (2010), Colorado’s Dan Hawkins (2010) and Michigan’s Rich Rodriguez (2010). 

Only Wulff, who received a 5 rating in 2010, survived. But now Dodd has stuck Wulff with another 5 this season.

Based on Dodd’s ratings the past three seasons, at least three, maybe four, coaches among Wulff, Locksley, Neuheisel, Toledo and Zook will not be back in 2012.

Which coach of the not so Fab 5 will survive and who did Dodd totally miss the boat on and not give a 4 or 5 rating that deserved one?

2011 Hot Seat Rating
5 Paul Wulff, Washington State
4.5 Mike Locksley, New Mexico
4 Rick Neuheisel, UCLA
4 Bob Toledo, Tulane
4 Ron Zook, Illinois

2010 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
5 Todd Dodge, North Texas
5 Dan Hawkins, Colorado
5 Rich Rodriguez, Michigan
4.5 Ralph Friedgen, Maryland
4 Tim Brewster, Minnesota
4 Bill Lynch, Indiana

Survived
5 Paul Wulff, Washington State
4.5 Mike Locksley, New Mexico
4.5 Ron Zook, Illinois

2009 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
5 Steve Kragthorpe, Louisville
4 Al Groh, Virginia
4 Mark Snyder, Marshall
4 Charlie Weis, Notre Dame

Survived
4 Todd Dodge, North Texas

2008 Hot Seat Rating
Gone after season
4.95 Ty Willingham, Washington
4.5 Greg Robinson, Syracuse
4 Brent Guy, Utah State

Survived
4 Mike Sanford, UNLV
4 Mike Stoops, Arizona


Posted on: June 21, 2011 3:26 pm
Edited on: June 22, 2011 8:51 am
 

Rutgers snares 5th highest per year stadium deal

High Point Solution Stadium. Not exactly the most tradition rich name in college sports, but, hey, it is the newest. Tuesday, Rutgers announced a 10-year naming rights deal with High Points Solution worth $6.5 million.

The initial reaction on my Twitter feed to a corporation naming a college stadium was "Ugh." But if you haven't figured out by now how vital big bucks are in college football these days, then it's time for you to take off your leather helmet and put it in storage.

Remember a time when bowl games were actually named after fruits and not dot.com businesses or car muffler stores? Yeah, me neither. Now it's a rarity if a bowl game isn't named after a corporation. Years from now, the same - unfortunately - will be said about college football stadiums.

Anyway, Rutgers' deal is the fifth-highest per year amount for a college stadium named after a corporation/business. This list does not include stadiums named after individuals who may have contributed several gazillion dollars (i.e. Oklahoma State's Boone Pickens Stadium). This list also does not include college teams that play in NFL stadiums, such as Pittsburgh's Heinz Field or South Florida's Raymond James Stadium.

Here are the 11 college stadiums named after corporations and I'm sure this list will double within the next five years. For what it's worth the breakdown of corporation named college stadiums by conference: Big East (3), ACC (2), Sun Belt (2), Big Ten (1), Big 12 (1), C-USA (1) and MAC (1). (1).

School (Year) Stadium Name; Terms

Minnesota (2005) TCF Bank Stadium; 25 years, $35 million
Per year average: $1.4 million

UCF (2006) Bright House Networks Stadium; 15 yrs, $15 million
Per year average: $1 million

Maryland (2006) Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Texas Tech (2006) Jones AT&T Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Rutgers (2011) High Point Solutions Stadium; 10 years, $6.5 million
Per year average: $650,000

Louisville (1998) Papa John's Cardinal Stadium; 10 years, $5 million
Per year average: $500,000

Louisville (2004) Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium; 33 years, $15 million
Per year average: $454,000

Akron (2009) InfoCision Stadium; 20 years, $10 million
Per year average: $500,000

Troy (2003) Movie Gallery Veterans Stadium; 20 yrs, $5 million
Per year average: $250,000

Syracuse (1980) Carrier Dome; Indefinite, $2.75 million
Per year average: n/a

Wake Forest (2007) BB&T Field; 10 years, undisclosed
Per year average: n/a

Western Kentucky (2007) Houchens Industries-L.T. Smith Stadium; unknown, $5 million
Per year average: n/a



Posted on: June 17, 2011 4:24 pm
Edited on: June 17, 2011 4:45 pm
 

Schools: NCAA's APR data for coaches not fair

Charlie Strong was hired at Louisville on Dec. 9, 2009. So he obviously did not coach the Cardinals during the 2009-10 season. But don’t tell the NCAA that, because according to how the NCAA computes the Academic Progress Rate (APR) scores, Strong was just as responsible for the Cardinals’ low APR score as former coach Steve Kragthorpe.

Because Strong was at the school during the 2009-10 school year, the NCAA gives Strong and Kragthorpe equal credit for the Cardinals’ APR score that year.

UL’s 869 APR out of 1,000 was the worst APR score among the 120 Football Bowl Subdivision schools in 2009-10.

In Wednesday’s study of the APR averages of the FBS coaches by CBSSports.com, I used the data provided by the NCAA. The coaches year-by-year APR scores are available on the NCAA’s website, if you want to check it out for yourself.

At least two schools – Louisville and UCF – believe the way the NCAA calculates the APR scores for coaches is not fair and misleading. Louisville believes Strong should not be saddled with the 2009-10 score of 869 - the school expects the 2010-11 APR to be significantly better.

UCF also believes Coach George O’Leary should not be credited with the 880 from the 2003-04 year because O’Leary was hired at UCF on Dec. 8, 2003.

UCF felt strongly enough about how the NCAA calculates the coaches APR scores, the school posted a story on its website following the CBSSports.com study. UCF's story did not include O'Leary's 2003-04 880 APR score. Louisville officials prefered not to comment for this story.

Based on the NCAA’s data, Strong ranked as the coach with the worst APR in FBS. Three other coaches that had the nation’s seven-worst coaching APRs – Akron’s Rob Ianello (900), Memphis’ Larry Porter (903) and Buffalo’s Jeff Quinn (918) – also were credited for a dismal APR score even though they arrived after that football season had been completed.

I e-mailed NCAA spokesman Eric Christianson Thursday, asking for an explanation why the NCAA computes the APR’s of the coaches that way. When I receive a response, I will let you know.



Posted on: May 31, 2011 9:51 pm
Edited on: May 31, 2011 10:50 pm
 

Petrino: NCAA changed its rules for Sugar Bowl

DESTIN, Fla. – Ohio State 31, Arkansas 26.

Not many individuals outside of Arkansas and Ohio remember the score from last season’s Sugar Bowl, but nearly everyone remembers that six Buckeyes were allowed to play in the contest after the NCAA determined they received improper benefits. The NCAA permitted them to play and delayed the player’s suspensions until this fall.

Arkansas coach Bobby Petrino was asked at Tuesday's SEC spring meetings about the Ohio State game and “should you have been playing a different team or have you let it go?”

“We wanted to play their best players,” Petrino said. “When you have a year like we had … and get to a BCS bowl game, you want to play their best players. That’s what you want to do.

“There’s no question that I don’t understand how they were eligible to play in the game. I just don’t and I never will.”

SEC commissioner Mike Slive, when told about Petrino’s comments, responded: “I can understand his position.”

Slive also was asked if he had ever seen a situation before where ineligible players were allowed to play and their suspensions delayed.

"I don't remember one," Slive said.   

Petrino related a situation when he coaching Louisville. He said two of his players were suspended after spending more than their allotted per diem on food because they were stranded in Newport, R.I., following the Big East’s media days. The punishment for the Louisville players was immediate, while, obviously, the OSU players had theirs suspensions postponed allowing them to play in the Sugar Bowl.

“I think they [the NCAA] kind of changed the rules for that bowl game,” Petrino said.

Petrino said he wasn’t surprised by the resignation of Ohio State coach Jim Tressel

“I can’t say I was surprised but I feel for him,” Petrino said. “When something like that happens you never like to see it. I feel for him, his family. It affects a lot of other people in the state and the university, so you feel for all those people.

“There are lessons to be learned from that, no question. One of the talks I have with my players is football is a game of courage. One of the lessons we always talk about is take the arrow in the forehead – which means tell the truth.

“Don’t be trying to blame things on your teammate next you. You have to be able to tell the truth with all your relationships with your professors, your girlfriend. … when it came out [Tressel] was dishonest with the NCAA you kind of knew it was going to spin a lot more.”

Posted on: May 24, 2011 1:45 pm
 

Louisville loses three scholarships

Louisville will lose three of its 25 football scholarship this year due to substandard academic progress rate (APR) scores, the school announced Friday.

The Cardinals' 2009-10 four-year APR for football for the period from 2006-10 is 908, below the minimum required mark of 925. In anticipation of the scholarship reduction, Louisville only signed 21 student-athletes in its 2011. Louisville will still be allowed its full allotment of 85 scholarship players.

"Continuity and stability among our coaching staffs lends itself to better performance and unfortunately our football student-athletes endured three football coaches in four years," UL athletic director Tom Jurich said in a statement.  "We want to improve our figures rapidly and I'm impressed with the measures Charlie Strong has implemented in our football program.  I'm confident that we are our currently headed in the right direction.  We have already addressed the penalties and have put it behind us."

Second-year head coach Charlie Strong has emphasized improving the team's APR rate and the Cardinals have already made strides.  Twenty-one of the 23 seniors who will be included in the 2010-11 APR report either have already graduated or are expected to graduate in August 2011.  In the classroom, the team's GPA has also risen over the last three semesters.

Louisville coach Charlie Strong said he will make it a priority in improving the team's APR rate. The school said 21 of the Cardinals' 23 seniors, which will be included in next year's APR report, have already graduated or are expected to graduate. Also, the team's GPA has increased in the last three semesters. 

The schools has taken several measures to improve its APR scores, including include adding academic support staff, which will provide better monitoring and support. Also more frequent progress reports will be addressed with the coaching staff and additional consequences have been established for failure to meet academic requirements.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com