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Category:NCAAF
Posted on: January 6, 2012 3:56 pm
 

The Mad Hatter Les Miles is not a fan of visors

NEW ORLEANS – Before Les Miles become the Mad Hatter at LSU, he was head coach at Oklahoma State.

Miles also wore a hat at Oklahoma State, but he would not let his staff at OSU wear visors because that was what Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops wore.

In 2001, Miles left a three-year stint as a Dallas Cowboys assistant to become head coach at Oklahoma State. Stoops was in his third season coaching at rival Oklahoma and Miles wanted to change the culture and attitude of Oklahoma State.

It all started with the hat.

“I can only tell you visors were not allowed while I was coaching at Oklahoma State, only because, frankly, it was an identity the opponents had,” Miles told CBSSports.com Friday. “The reality of it is a lot of the young guys had real thick hair, all wanted visors. I said, 'No we're wearing hats or we're wearing nothing.'

"A lot of them opted into the nothing. We wanted to be discernibly different, that's all.” 

Mike Gundy was Oklahoma State’s offensive coordinator under Miles from 2001-04 until Miles went to LSU.

Gundy said he had heard that Miles wouldn’t let his staff wear visors during his time at Oklahoma State because Stoops wore one at Oklahoma.

“I never asked him directly if that was the reason,” Gundy told CBSSports.com. “I do know this: another assistant and I wanted to wear a visor (at Oklahoma State) and he (Miles) said ‘we don’t wear visors.’

“He’s got those 10-gallon hats. I didn’t wear one. They were wider than my head. I went to the equipment room and they said we don’t have visors. I never asked why we couldn’t have visors. We just couldn’t have visors.”

Since Gundy replaced Miles as head coach at Oklahoma State in 2005, Gundy has worn visors. As for Miles, he’s still the Mad Hatter.

LSU sophomore free safety Eric Reid was asked if he’s ever seen Miles wear a visor.

“I don’t think so,” Reid said laughing.


Posted on: January 1, 2012 6:45 pm
Edited on: January 1, 2012 8:31 pm
 

SkyCam grounded for Fiesta

GLENDALE, Ariz. – SkyCam has been grounded for Monday’s Fiesta Bowl.

ESPN will not use SkyCam, the overhead camera that crashed to the ground during Friday’s Insight Bowl, at the Fiesta Bowl. SkyCam also was not used at Saturday’s Chick-fil-A Bowl because of safety concerns after the 25-pound camera nearly fell on Iowa wide receiver Marvin McNutt during the Insight Bowl.

Even though ESPN will not use SkyCam at the Fiesta Bowl, it will use Spidercam, a similar overhead camera device, at the Rose Bowl. The network also has determined it will use SkyCam for the Outback, Capital One, Sugar, Orange and BCS title games.

"After a thorough review, a cause was determined (for the Insight Bowl incident) and fix implemented that involves extra precautions being put in place for the camera's use at the remaining bowls," ESPN spokesperson Keri Potts said.

Because the Arizona Cardinals played at University of Phoenix Stadium Sunday afternoon, officials from ESPN and SkyCam felt there wasn’t enough time before Monday night’s Fiesta Bowl at University of Phoenix Stadium to adequately test the camera system, which requires using wires above the field.

SkyCam is a division of Winnercomm, Inc., a sports production and development company in Tulsa, Okla. The company's website claims that SkyCam is the only stabilized camera system in the world that can unobtrusively fly anywhere in a defined three-dimensional space.

The camera is 36 inches high, weighs 25 pounds and travels up to 30 mph across the guide wire, according to the company.

Late in the fourth quarter of the Insight Bowl between Iowa and Oklahoma, Iowa wide receiver Marvin McNutt was nearly hit by the camera when it crashed to the turf.

McNutt then became entangled in the guide wire after it hit the ground. McNutt, who suffered only a minor scratch, joked after the game he “felt like somebody was trying to kill me on (Oklahoma's) staff.”

“First, I looked: ‘What is it that fell from the sky?’ ” McNutt said. “'The next thing I know, the camera kind of scratched me a little bit. It was just pulling me and I knew I didn't want to keep going with it.”

Here is the video of the SkyCam crash at the Insight Bowl.
Posted on: December 31, 2011 1:26 am
Edited on: December 31, 2011 1:31 am
 

Oklahoma outlasts Iowa

TEMPE, Ariz. – On Thursday, Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops talked about the Sooners’ tradition. He mentioned the Sooners’ seven national titles.

Oklahoma has won “more than most people do,” Stoops said.

This year, the Sooners were the overwhelming favorites to win an eighth national championship. They were ranked No. 1 in both of the preseason Associated Press and USA Today coaches polls.

With 14 starters returning from last year’s 12-2 Fiesta Bowl and Big 12 championship team, the Sooners expected this season to be a historic one.

Unfortunately, it was.

Friday night’s victory against unranked Iowa at the Insight Bowl capped off one of the most disappointing seasons in Oklahoma’s storied history and also put the Sooners’ in some not-so-illustrious company.

Ranked No. 19 entering the game, Oklahoma will become only the third preseason No. 1 ranked team in the last 27 years that finished the season ranked outside the top 10 in the final AP poll. The others, according to collegepollarchive.com were Georgia, which finished No. 13 in 2008, and Penn State, finishing No. 16 in 1997.

The Sooners’ slide can be attributed to several factors: season-ending injuries to leading receiver Ryan Broyles and rusher Dom Whaley, transfers and a couple of head-scratching losses. The 41-38 defeat to Texas Tech as a four-touchdown favorite was the worst upset loss in Stoops’ career and OU’s 44-10 beat down by Oklahoma State was the most points the Sooners allowed to the Cowboys since 1945.


Category: NCAAF
Posted on: December 8, 2011 5:13 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 5:54 pm
 

Big Ten's Delany on SEC: "They've dominated"

NEW YORK – The following is a public service announcement about the Southeastern Conference from – huh, what’s this? – Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany?

Delany was asked Thursday if the SEC wields too much power in college football today.

“Whatever credibility they have sort of developed, it’s on the field in our system,” Delany said. “And they’ve had great athletes and some great coaches and together, over a period of over half a decade, they’ve dominated at the elite level.”

The SEC has won five consecutive BCS national titles and has clinched a sixth with SEC rivals LSU and Alabama meeting for the BCS championship on Jan. 9 in New Orleans.

“I think they’ve earned it and they’ve deserved it,” Delany said. “When there’s a benefit of the doubt, I think it’s very natural for them to get it. Until you beat them on the field, in the system, they deserve that benefit.

“Who deserves it more than the reigning champion? You have to beat the champion, whether that’s in heavyweight prize fighting or in the BCS. When all things are equal, I think you have to lean toward the entity that has produced the result over time.”




Category: NCAAF
Posted on: December 8, 2011 1:50 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 1:54 pm
 

Notre Dame football remaining independent

NEW YORK – Notre Dame to the ACC? Notre Dame to the Big Ten? How about Notre Dame to the Big 12 or SEC?

It’s not going to happen, Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick said Thursday.

The Irish plan to remain an independent in football and are confident with the future of the Big East after the league introduced five new members Wednesday. The majority of Notre Dame’s non-football schools compete in the Big East, which allows Notre Dame to be an independent in football.

However, there had been some speculation that because of the league's uncertainty, Notre Dame might be forced to join another conference in football.

“We’re thrilled with the announcement of the Big East’s new members and we think it delivers on the (league’s) stability,” Swarbrick told CBSSports.com. “It’s great news for the Big East and it’s a great home for us for most of our sports.”

The Big East announced Wednesday Boise State and San Diego State would join the league in football-only in 2013 and add Houston, UCF and SMU in all sports. By the Big East remaining together, it allows Notre Dame to compete as a Big East member in virtually all sports but football, while remaining a football independent.

“Father (John) Jenkins was trying to provide leadership to help the Big East navigate through this period of time,” Swarbrick said of Notre Dame’s president. “We welcome the new Big East members and we think it speaks to the future vitality and stability of the Big East.”

With the addition of Houston, UCF and SMU in 2013 and if West Virginia, Pittsburgh and Syracuse remain in the league until June 30, 2014 as scheduled, that means during the 2013-14 school year the Big East would have at least 19 basketball members.

“It doesn’t scare me,” Swarbrick said. “You could figure out a way to set up the schedule. The amount of time they’ve spent determining how many teams will play in the Big East tournament is another story. I think it’s manageable.”

Swarbrick said he would defer to the conference whether West Virginia, Pittsburgh and Syracuse should be allowed to leave a year early in 2013 when the new members are added.

The biggest question Swarbrick said he gets from the media and when he travels around the country at speaking engagements is whether the Irish will remain an independent in football.

He estimated he speaks each year at between 80-100 Notre Dame clubs or fundraisers in association with a Fighting Irish game.

“You can’t do a Q/A without one of those (questions about if Notre Dame is joining a conference),” Swarbrick said. “They (Notre Dame’s fan base) are pretty clear: they want status quo and national championships.

“It’s easy,” he joked.

Status quo as a football independent and national championships.

“But not in that order, that’s exactly right,” Swarbrick said.

Posted on: December 8, 2011 11:43 am
Edited on: December 8, 2011 1:16 pm
 

BCS AQ status likely gone in 2014

NEW YORK – For all the critics of the BCS, rejoice: it appears that the BCS automatic qualifying status format will be gone in 2014.

At least that’s the indication that Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany and Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowsky gave during Thursday’s IMG Forum at the Marriott Marquis.

“Some of the people that don’t have (BCS AQ status), say they don’t want it,” Delany said. “Some of the people that do have it, don’t really care about it. Maybe it needs to be reconsidered. I’m not wed to it. I’m wed to the 1-2 game and I’m wed to the Rose Bowl. I’m not wed to the (BCS AQ) selection process or the limitations.”

The current BCS format expires after the 2013 season. There is growing speculation that when the new format is voted on and established in 2014, it could simply be reduced to only pitting the No. 1 and No. 2 teams in a bowl game or a Plus-One model (the top four teams would be seeded in the bowl games).

Either the Plus-One or without the Plus-One model would allow the other current BCS bowl games – Fiesta, Sugar, Orange and Rose – to simply align with whichever conferences they want and would not be required to select teams based on a BCS ranking.

"I feel strongly it’s been a negative driver from our perspective,” Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowsky. “I hope to be involved in a BCS we do it in a way where we can create a more happy BCS without these class systems. I think it’s possible to do it. In a competitive format that requires teams to be competitive teams in order to participate.”

Added Delany: “As long as I can go to the Rose Bowl, I don’t really care,” Delany said.

Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick isn't in favor of the Plus-One model, but expects change in 2014.

“(Without the BCS AQ format) takes so many forms, it's hard to draw a conclusion from that," Swarbrick said. "You could fashion a version which probably would be good. It doesn’t take a lot of imagination to fashion a version that might not be good."

Posted on: December 7, 2011 7:38 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 7:43 pm
 

Big East: different look, but same name

NEW YORK – First things first: the Big East Conference, stretching four time zones from the East Coast to the West Coast, is not undergoing a name change.

It will remain the Big East.

It will, however, look much, much different.

On Wednesday, the league announced that Boise State, San Diego State, Houston, SMU and UCF would join the league in 2013. Boise State and San Diego State as football-only members and Houston, SMU and UCF as all-sport members.

And even with the addition of those five schools, Big East commissioner John Marinatto said the league has no plans to allow West Virginia (to the Big 12) and Syracuse and Pittsburgh (to the ACC) to leave before June 30, 2014, as required by conference by-laws.

“The additions that we're making today have no impact whatsoever in regard to our commitment and our belief that our schools that are leaving would fulfill the 27‑month requirement clause that's currently in our bylaws,” Marinatto said. “The bylaws are the bylaws are the bylaws. They represent the agreements between the conference schools. I think there's an understanding amongst all of our schools that an early departure and a violation of those bylaws would do damage to the schools that are remaining. As a result, two of our schools have indicated that they respect that process and they understand it.”

Those two schools are Syracuse and Pittsburgh. West Virginia, however, has filed a lawsuit to join the Big 12 next season. The Big East also has filed a lawsuit to make West Virginia honor the exit agreement until 2014.

West Virginia athletic director Oliver Luck told CBSSports.com Wednesday that even if the league compromised and allowed the Mountaineers to leave a year early in 2013, their plans are still to join the Big 12 next season.

“That doesn’t change,” Luck told CBSSports.com.

Syracuse athletic director Daryl Gross said his school is prepared to honor the 27-month exit agreement, but told CBSSports.com “we’re just open to seeing what happens.”

“They’re starting to put together what the new Big East will look like,” Gross said. “As they go forward to put together new multi-media deals, they’re going to need us to move out of the way. We’re waiting for that.”

Marinatto said that was not the case. So if West Virginia, Pitt and Syracuse must remain in the league through June 30, 2014, that means the Big East in 2013 would consist of at least 13 teams in football and 19 schools in basketball.

Officials at Air Force, which was a target of the Big East as a football-only member, told the Gazette Wednesday, that it would remain in the Mountain West. Navy, however, remains a viable target, but won’t make any decisions this week that would take attention away from Saturday’s Army-Navy game.

The new Big East is certainly bigger than any conference out there. It’s got a bigger footprint than even Bigfoot.

“We've envisioned the premise that we could theoretically on any given Saturday have four kickoffs that don't compete with each other,” Marinatto said. “We think, as I mentioned earlier, that's a very powerful model as we move forward in our upcoming TV negotiations.”

Those will begin in 2012. The Big East first must give ESPN the first opportunity as its currents rights holder and if they don’t reach a deal by November 2012 then the Big East could negotiate with other networks such as Fox or NBC/Comcast.

NCAA President Mark Emmert, without specially mentioning the Big East, discussed schools leaving non-automatic BCS qualifying conferences (such as Boise State, Houston, San Diego State, UCF and SMU) for an automatic qualifying BCS conference such as the Big East.

“There’s a lot of motivation’s going on (with expansion), clearly the BCS automatic qualifying position is driving a lot of this,” Emmert said at the IMG Forum at the Marriott Marquis. “Nobody wants to lose their AQ rights in the BCS and, of course, one of the ironies is the BCS is going to be refined again (in 2014).”

And if there remains BCS AQ conferences at that time, the Big East feels strongly it will remain one.

“Part of our objectives in expansion was to create the best conference we could both on the football side as well as other sports,” Marinatto said. “We recognize obviously the departure of the schools leaving the conference affected us. But we always felt confident that if we made the right moves, we would keep our BCS AQ status and we've done that.”

Posted on: December 7, 2011 6:47 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 6:58 pm
 

Stanford AD says "Plus-One" model inevitable

NEW YORK - On Monday, the Big 12's athletic directors took a straw poll and were in favor of a plus-one format, allowing the top four teams to play for a national title, SI.com reported.

On Wednesday, Stanford athletic director Bob Bowlsby went a step further, calling the plus-one model "inevitable" when the new BCS cycle begins in 2014.

"I happen to agree with my conference colleagues about the plus-one game," Bowlsby said Wednesday at the IMG Forum at the Marriott Marquis. "I think it's inevitable at this point."

While a panel of athletic directors mostly opposed a large playoff, similar to the one held at the FCS level, Washington athletic director Scott Woodward said he's in favor of the plus-one format and went as far to say he thinks it will eventually happen.

NCAA President Mark Emmert also said he is "confident some change (will happen) in the BCS format" in 2014, when the new cycle is implemented. He would not, however, give specifics and would not comment if he was in a favor of the "plus-one" model.

Category: NCAAF
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com