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Tag:Big 12
Posted on: September 25, 2011 5:06 pm
Edited on: September 25, 2011 5:35 pm
 

Texas A&M to join SEC in 2012

Texas A&M will join the SEC for all sports beginning with the 2012-13 academic year, the SEC announced Sunday.

The league's Presidents and Chancellors voted unanimously to add the Aggies as their 13th member.

The next question for the SEC is who's next? Sources have indicated if Missouri does not join the league, the SEC is prepared to go through the 2012-13 season with only 13 members. If Missouri remains in the Big 12, the most likely candidates appear Virginia Tech or Florida State, CBSSports.com's Tony Barnhart reported.

Adding Texas A&M is the first expansion for the SEC since September 1991 when the University of South Carolina joined the league. Arkansas joined the SEC in August of 1991. With the addition of Arkansas and South Carolina, the SEC was the first conference to split into divisions and add a conference championship game in 1992.

“The Southeastern Conference Presidents and Chancellors are pleased to welcome Texas A&M University to the SEC family,” Dr. Bernie Machen, chair of the SEC Presidents and Chancellors and president of the University of Florida said in a statement. “The addition of Texas A&M University as the SEC’s 13th member gives our league a prestigious academic institution with a strong athletic tradition and a culture similar to our current institutions.”

Texas A&M President R. Bowen Loftin, who told CBSSports.com on Saturday, he expected any legal issues to be resolved "shortly" also issued a statement.

“The Southeastern Conference provides Texas A&M the national visibility that our great university and our student-athletes deserve,” Loftin said. “We are excited to begin competition in the nation’s premier athletic conference. This is a 100-year decision that we have addressed carefully and methodically, and I believe the Southeastern Conference gives the Aggies the best situation of any conference in the country.”

Texas A&M, located in College Station, will also be the third institution in the SEC with membership in the prestigious Association of American Universities, joining Florida and Vanderbilt. Texas A&M's 50,000 enrollment ranks as the nation's sixth-largest university, with 360,000 former students worldwide.

By moving to the SEC, Texas A&M and Texas officials have hinted this might be the last season for the rivalry between the Aggies and Longhorns.

“On behalf of our presidents, chancellors, athletics directors, students and fans, I welcome Texas A&M University to the SEC family,” SEC Commissioner Mike Slive said. “Texas A&M is a nationally-prominent institution on and off the field and a great fit for the SEC tradition of excellence—athletically, academically and culturally.”

The Aggies sponsor 20 varsity sports.  Men’s sports include baseball, basketball, football, golf, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field and cross country.  Women’s sports include basketball, equestrian, golf, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field and cross country and volleyball.  Texas A&M participates in every sport sponsored by the SEC except gymnastics and the SEC sponsors every sport the Aggies participate in except equestrian.


Posted on: September 8, 2011 9:53 pm
Edited on: September 9, 2011 1:18 am
 

OSU: Focused on Big 12, won't speculate on Pac-12

STILLWATER, Okla. – Oklahoma State President Burns Hargis told CBSSports.com Thursday his school is focused on remaining in the Big 12. However, he would not speculate on the Cowboys’ future if Texas A&M leaves the league.

“I think [the Big 12] can exist,” Hargis said. “I don’t think it’s a fait accompli A&M is gone. Obviously the SEC had a string on their bid.”

Hargis said if Texas A&M leaves, Oklahoma and Oklahoma State are “not necessarily” headed to the Pac-12. “That’s a hypothetical, but we want 10 teams [in the Big 12].”

What could push the Sooners and Cowboys to the Pac-12?

“At this point, we’re focused on the Big 12 going forward,” Hargis said before Oklahoma State’s game with, ironically, Pac-12 member Arizona. “I wouldn’t want to get into [the possibility of the Pac-12]. That’s a hypothetical and a hypothetical. It’s just not anything we’re real focused on right now.”

An Oklahoma State source told CBSSports.com that OSU would not sue Texas A&M or the SEC if Texas A&M left.

Since Texas A&M announced it was leaving the Big 12, Baylor President Ken Starr threatened to sue the SEC and Commissioner Mike Slive for tortious interference. The SEC released a statement before Starr's threat. It read in part:

“After receiving unanimous written assurance from the Big 12 on Sept. 2 that the Southeastern Conference was free to accept Texas A&M to join as a new member, the presidents and chancellors of the SEC met last night with the intention of accepting the application of Texas A&M to be the newest member of the SEC. We were notified [Tuesday] afternoon that at least one Big 12 institution had withdrawn its previous consent and was considering legal action.”

Hargis said he didn’t believe the SEC thought the conference could waive the rights of the individual institutions.

“Only the regents can waive [legal] claims of the university,” Hargis said. “The conference can’t do it, the presidents can’t do it. I think as far as conference was concerned there was no intention to take any action.”

Hargis said he wasn’t aware of a timetable when this all gets resolved. Oklahoma President David Boren estimated it would take less than three weeks.

“We’d all like to resolve it that fast but I don’t know a timetable,” Hargis said. “There’s no big rush. Everyone has to work through and get their conditions on the table and move forward.

“We have 10 really good schools. We had a close call with A&M. All of us wanted them to stay. The only ones that didn’t want them to stay was A&M, which is kind of a critical point. But hopefully maybe this event will give everyone time to take a deep breath.”



Posted on: September 7, 2011 6:56 pm
 

Bowl system will be "chaos" if Big 12 implodes

If the Big 12 implodes next season by Texas A&M leaving for the SEC and more Big 12 teams leaving for other leagues, it would open up a BCSbowl spot for an at-large team but also would have an even greater impact on the bowl system.

"If the Big 12 isn't around next year, I can sum up the bowl system in one word: chaos," a college football industry source told CBSSports.com.

The Fiesta Bowl gets the Big 12 champion, if it doesn’t finish among the top two in the final BCS standings, as its "anchor" team. However without a Big 12 Conference, the Fiesta would be left to choose two at-large teams.

But it wouldn't be that simple. A major question would be when would the Fiesta Bowl get its first pick of at-large teams? The BCS by-laws are currently set up so that the five bowls – BCS, Rose, Fiesta, Orange and Sugar – have a set rotation each year to fill their bowls. Without a Big 12 champion would the Fiesta Bowl get the first at-large pick overall or have to wait until the last pick?

Bowl sources said that could be a major issue since the BCS certainly couldn’t have predicted the Big 12 might not be around when the current BCS contract expires after the January 2014 games.

“We’re in close contact with our partners and are monitoring developments,” a Fiesta Bowl spokesperson said Wednesday. “We are not going to speculate on rumors related to the Big 12 Conference or anyone else for that matter.”

BCS executive director Bill Hancock also said Wednesday he does not discuss hypothetical situations.

Also, the BCS bowls can only take two teams from a conference, so that would increase the chances for non-AQ conference teams, such as Boise State, to secure an at-large BCS bowl bid.

A bigger – and more complex – issue that would impact one-fifth of the bowls would be what does the bowls with Big 12 tie-ins do for teams if there is no Big 12?

Besides the Fiesta, the Big 12 bowl lineup is Cotton, Alamo, Insight, Holiday, Texas and Pinstripe.

So the Cotton, instead of pairing the No. 2 team from the Big 12 against the No. 3 pick from the SEC, would have to wait until all of the other remaining bowls with existing contracts with the other 10 conferences choose their teams before it could fill that spot.

“What do you think will happen when [SEC commissioner] Mike Slive’s third-place team doesn’t have a quality opponent,” a source said.

The bowls all have specific contracts indicating a specific pick from a conference to play another specific pick from another conference.

But if that conference is the Big 12 and it doesn’t exist anymore, it would be nullify the bowl agreement and nullify the television contract, a source said.

“You’d be starting over," a source said. "It involves everyone. What are we going to do? Have a draft of teams? ESPN doesn’t want to broadcast Michigan vs. Fresno State, it wants to televise Michigan against a comparable BCS program.”

“If the Big 12 doesn't survive," said a college football industry source, “the bowl system will be a gigantic mess.”


Posted on: September 7, 2011 9:39 am
Edited on: September 7, 2011 11:46 am
 

Baylor puts Texas A&M move to SEC on hold

Five days ago, the Big 12 institutions agreed received “written assurance” from the Big 12 that the SEC could add Texas A&M without any legal issues. Well, a funny thing happened on the way to expansion: Baylor has changed its mind and has the SEC, at least for now, in a holding pattern.

Consequently, Texas A&M officials are left in a wait-and-see mode, releasing a statement from school president R. Bowen Loftin.

"We are certainly pleased with the action taken last night by the presidents and chancellors of the Southeastern Conference to unanimously accept Texas A&M as the league’s 13th member. However, this acceptance is conditional, and we are disappointed in the threats made by one of the Big 12 member institutions to coerce Texas A&M into staying in Big 12 Conference. These actions go against the commitment that was made by this university and the Big 12 on Sept. 2. We are working diligently to resolve any and all issues as outlined by the SEC."

Can Baylor’s threat of a lawsuit really keep Texas A&M out of the SEC? Baylor's Bad News Bears is going to stop the Big 12 from crumbling? Stay tuned.

Here’s the SEC’s official statement from Florida President Dr. Bernie Machen, Chair of the SEC’s Presidents and Chancellors.

“After receiving unanimous written assurance from the Big 12 on September 2 that the Southeastern Conference was free to accept Texas A&M to join as a new member, the presidents and chancellors of the SEC met last night with the intention of accepting the application of Texas A&M to be the newest member of the SEC,” Machen said. “We were notified yesterday afternoon that at least one Big 12 institution had withdrawn its previous consent and was considering legal action.

“The SEC has stated that to consider an institution for membership, there must be no contractual hindrances to its departure.  The SEC voted unanimously to accept Texas A&M University as a member upon receiving acceptable reconfirmation that the Big 12 and its members have reaffirmed the letter dated September 2, 2011.”





Category: NCAAF
Posted on: September 3, 2011 1:48 pm
 

Oklahoma State's thoughts on Big 12 future

Oklahoma State President Burns Hargis released a statement Saturday regarding Big 12 Conference discussions.

"We want to be clear that we worked actively to encourage Texas A&M to remain in the Big 12 Conference and regret they decided to leave," Hargis said. "We are moving ahead.

"Oklahoma State University's athletic program has never been stronger from top to bottom, putting us in a position to explore and pursue options, including the possible expansion of our current conference. We are in close communications with our colleagues at the University of Oklahoma and expect a decision soon that will be in the best interest of our institutions and the state of Oklahoma."

In other words, if Oklahoma is leaving to the Pac-12/16, Oklahoma State fully expects to go with them.

Hargis' statement comes a day after Oklahoma President David Boren said the Sooners had been contacted by multiple conferences and that the Sooners were not "going to be a wallflower when all is said and done."

Like Hargis, Boren said he tried to prevent Texas A&M from leaving the Big 12. The Aggies are expected to join the SEC.

Boren said the Sooners expect to decide whether to leave in three weeks. He said he flew to Missouri to confer with chancellor Brady Deaton,the chairman of the Big 12 board of directors, and to College Station, Texas, to try to prevent Texas A&M from leaving for the SEC.

Oklahoma was offered chances to join both the Pac-10 and the SEC last year, but decided to stick with the Big 12, even as Nebraska left to join the Big Ten and Colorado joined the Pac-10, now the Pac-12.

"Of course, we have some great partners in the existing Big 12," Boren said. "We have interest from other conferences and other universities, so it's really a tribute to the strength of our program at the University of Oklahoma that there is so much interest in us.

"So, we have to carefully evaluate the various comments that are being made to us and the various possibilities that are being shown to us before we decide what's best for the university to do."


Posted on: August 17, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 1:36 pm
 

Emmert: no conference realignment summit

After NCAA president Mark Emmert read erroneous media reports that he planned to have a summit on conference realignment, he emailed several officials throughout intercollegiate athletics to clarify no meetings would take place.

CBSSports.com obtained the document Emmert sent out.

"I have been and will continue to engage individual presidents and commissioners about the reform effort that was launched last week as part of the Division I presidential retreat," Emmert wrote. "In that context, all constituents have been involved in meaningful discussion on how best to conduct our business, including conference realignments, in the best interests of student-athletes. Open and frank discussion is needed to ensure expected reforms are not derailed in any way. However, I have not proposed, nor do I have plans to propose a summit on conference realignment as recently reported by several media outlets. Such reports are simply in error."

Getting all the key players from the SEC, Big 12, Pac-12, Big Ten, ACC and Big East conferences together to discuss conference realignment would seem like a good idea for the future of college athletics. But an NCAA spokesman said that was never a consideration.

"Conference affilations are the purview of the conferences not the NCAA," said Bob Williams, the NCAA's vice president of communications.

I asked Williams if there also were legal reasons why Emmert wouldn't meet with the BCS conference commissioners.

"Antitrust is always an issue," he said.

Posted on: August 13, 2011 5:16 pm
Edited on: August 15, 2011 11:57 am
 

BYU, Louisville say they're happy where they are

NOTE: This is an update from an earlier post on BYU and Louisville.

If - or when - the Big 12 starts seeking a replacement for Texas A&M, at least two possible candidates told CBSSports.com they are happy with their current situations.

BYU, which left the Mountain West last season to become an independent, plans to remain an independent, while Louisville is happy to remain in the Big East. That, of course, could change if either school receives an invitation to join the Big 12. Both schools have been speculated as possible targets of the Big 12 if Texas A&M leaves for the SEC.

"We have not been contacted by anybody," BYU athletic director Tom Holmoe said. "We are very happy with our partnerships and relationships with ESPN, BYUtv and the West Coast Conference [in BYU's Olympic sports.]

"We like the plans we have made as an independent in football and with the West Coast Conference. We are moving forward fast on that path and getting ready for a big season."

Louisville athletic director Tom Jurich said the Cardinals are excited about the future of the Big East.

The league recently turned down a nine-year, $1.4 billion media rights deal from ESPN and is line for an even bigger deal in the next couple years from ESPN, NBC/Comcast or Fox.

"We are very happy where we are," Jurich said.

Neither Holmoe or Jurich would address any other conferences. I also asked Holmoe how committed BYU was to being an independent. "Just focusing in on what could be an exciting year for Cougar football," he said.

One official at a BCS conference, that could be affected by Texas A&M's move to the SEC and the resulting dominos, said Saturday he had not heard of any new developments.

"The only news is whatever your colleagues make up," he said jokingly.
Category: NCAAF
Posted on: August 11, 2011 3:51 pm
Edited on: August 11, 2011 4:02 pm
 

17 football schools wouldn't have met APR minimum

With the NCAA’s Division 1 Board of Directors decision on Thursday to increase the average four-year APR score to 930 in order to be able to participate in the NCAA basketball tournament and bowl games, 17 of the Football Bowl Subdivision schools would not have met the APR requirement in the 2009-10 season.

Here are the football programs by conference that did not have a 930 APR in 2009-10:

ACC – Maryland, N.C. State
Big East – Louisville
Big Ten – Michigan
Pac-12 – Colorado, Washington State
Conference USA – UAB, Houston, Southern Miss, Tulsa, UTEP
Independent – Brigham Young
Mid-American – Akron
Sun Belt – Florida Atlantic, Louisiana-Monroe
WAC – Idaho, New Mexico State

Each school from the Big 12, SEC and Mountain West had at least a 930 APR.

Of the 17 schools with sub 930 APRs, eight played in bowl games last season – Maryland, N.C. State, Louisville, Michigan, Southern Miss, Tulsa, UTEP and BYU.

If the 930 APR requirement was in place, the Beef O' Brady's St. Petersburg Bowl (Louisville vs. Southern Miss) and New Mexico Bowl (BYU vs. UTEP) would have been seeking additional teams since their four schools would not have qualified.



 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com