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Tag:Big 12
Posted on: August 3, 2011 9:18 am
 

Big East move should help keep Patterson at TCU

NEWPORT, R.I. – Besides all the obvious benefits of TCU’s move to the Big East – money, better BCS bowl access, money, more television exposure, money and money – another plus for the Horned Frogs is it could make it easier to keep Gary Patterson in Fort Worth.

Patterson has been mentioned as a candidate for multiple openings in past years, but has remained at TCU. He begins his 12th season with the Horned Frogs on Sept. 2 against Baylor. The Horned Frogs are playing their final season in the Mountain West before moving to the Big East next season.

“Gary has an opportunity to create his own shadow,” TCU athletic director Chris Del Conte said. “You can go somewhere else and you’re following some one else’s footsteps.

“You go to Alabama, it’s still Bear Bryant. You go to Texas, it’s still Darrell Royal. You go to Arkansas, it’s Frank Broyles. It’s still Woody Hayes at Ohio [State] and Bo Schembechler at Michigan. Gary is that figure for us. He is our iconic figure.”

The Horned Frogs are in the process of $105 million expansion and renovation of Amon Carter Stadium. It’s scheduled to be completed for the 2012 season. That’s only one piece of the puzzle, Del Conte said.

“The one thing we have to continue to do is invest in facilities, invest in staff and invest in our program,” Del Conte said. “But Gary’s created that iconic figure for us. That’s something to be said.

“The grass isn’t always greener. That whole field is riddled with people who thought it was greener and they’re now skeletons littered in the weeds.”

The Horned Frogs first game in the renovated Carter Stadium in 2012 will be against Grambling on Sept. 8. TCU’s first season as a Big East member also will include home games against Oklahoma, Virginia, Cincinnati, Louisville, South Florida and West Virginia and road games at Pittsburgh, UConn, Rutgers and Syracuse.

Even though the Horned Frogs aren’t members of the Big East yet, Del Conte has an opinion on the league's expansion.

“Whatever we do, you have to have significant value to the mosaic that is already there,” Del Conte said. “If not, keep the league at what it’s at. Nine, 10, 12 [teams] – I have no dog in that race. Our forefathers do. My opinion is you have to add significant value and preserve the Big East’s tradition and history in basketball and what Dave Gavitt created way back in the day.”

Del Conte said he’s confident a Big East team will be playing for a national championship – in football – in the very near future and referenced near misses by Cincinnati in 2009 (if Texas doesn’t edge Nebraska in the Big 12 title game) and West Virginia in 2007 (if the Mountaineers defeat Pitt in regular season finale).

“There will be a Big East team playing in the national championship game soon enough,” Del Conte said. “There will be.”

Posted on: June 21, 2011 3:26 pm
Edited on: June 22, 2011 8:51 am
 

Rutgers snares 5th highest per year stadium deal

High Point Solution Stadium. Not exactly the most tradition rich name in college sports, but, hey, it is the newest. Tuesday, Rutgers announced a 10-year naming rights deal with High Points Solution worth $6.5 million.

The initial reaction on my Twitter feed to a corporation naming a college stadium was "Ugh." But if you haven't figured out by now how vital big bucks are in college football these days, then it's time for you to take off your leather helmet and put it in storage.

Remember a time when bowl games were actually named after fruits and not dot.com businesses or car muffler stores? Yeah, me neither. Now it's a rarity if a bowl game isn't named after a corporation. Years from now, the same - unfortunately - will be said about college football stadiums.

Anyway, Rutgers' deal is the fifth-highest per year amount for a college stadium named after a corporation/business. This list does not include stadiums named after individuals who may have contributed several gazillion dollars (i.e. Oklahoma State's Boone Pickens Stadium). This list also does not include college teams that play in NFL stadiums, such as Pittsburgh's Heinz Field or South Florida's Raymond James Stadium.

Here are the 11 college stadiums named after corporations and I'm sure this list will double within the next five years. For what it's worth the breakdown of corporation named college stadiums by conference: Big East (3), ACC (2), Sun Belt (2), Big Ten (1), Big 12 (1), C-USA (1) and MAC (1). (1).

School (Year) Stadium Name; Terms

Minnesota (2005) TCF Bank Stadium; 25 years, $35 million
Per year average: $1.4 million

UCF (2006) Bright House Networks Stadium; 15 yrs, $15 million
Per year average: $1 million

Maryland (2006) Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Texas Tech (2006) Jones AT&T Stadium; 25 years, $20 million
Per year average: $800,000

Rutgers (2011) High Point Solutions Stadium; 10 years, $6.5 million
Per year average: $650,000

Louisville (1998) Papa John's Cardinal Stadium; 10 years, $5 million
Per year average: $500,000

Louisville (2004) Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium; 33 years, $15 million
Per year average: $454,000

Akron (2009) InfoCision Stadium; 20 years, $10 million
Per year average: $500,000

Troy (2003) Movie Gallery Veterans Stadium; 20 yrs, $5 million
Per year average: $250,000

Syracuse (1980) Carrier Dome; Indefinite, $2.75 million
Per year average: n/a

Wake Forest (2007) BB&T Field; 10 years, undisclosed
Per year average: n/a

Western Kentucky (2007) Houchens Industries-L.T. Smith Stadium; unknown, $5 million
Per year average: n/a



Posted on: June 20, 2011 9:42 pm
Edited on: June 21, 2011 8:52 am
 

How Big East deal would have compared to others

One billion dollars. That's what the Big East turned down from ESPN last month, sources told CBSSports.com. Of course that doesn't mean the league won't get the same offer - or more - from ESPN, NBC/Comcast or Fox in the next several months.

The offer on the table, though, was a good one. Sources said ESPN offered to extend its current deal with the league for nine years at between $110 million to $130 million annually, or about a $1 billion for the entire deal. That would have drawn the Big East a lot closer to the other AQ BCS leagues and locked them up through the 2022-23 school year.

"Whatever that gap is [between the Big East and other five AQ BCS leagues], it would have been as small [a difference to the others] as possible," a college football industry source told CBSSports.com. "You [the Big East] don't want to be so far in the rear view mirror that you're not connected with the other five."

Here's how the Big East's proposed deal would have stacked up with the other big boys. Of course, remember these deals represent different lengths of contracts and also a different membership size, so it's not necessarily an apples-to-apples comparison as far as per school value. But it would have put the Big East in the same neighborhood.

Big East offer: $990,000 to $1.17 billion over nine years from ESPN/ABC
ACC:
$1.86 billion from ESPN/ABC over 12 years
Big 12: $1.1 billion from Fox over 13 years, $480 million from ESPN/ABC for eight years. This does not include Texas' $15 million from ESPN for its Longhorn Network.
Big Ten: $2.8 billion from Big Ten Network for 25 years, $1 billion from ESPN/ABC through 2016
SEC: $2.25 billion from ESPN for 15 years, $825 billion from CBS for 15 years
Pac-12: $3 billion from ESPN and Fox for 12 years



Category: NCAAF
Posted on: June 20, 2011 1:13 pm
Edited on: June 20, 2011 1:34 pm
 

Big East received more $ from hoops than BCS

In case you need more evidence that basketball is truly king in the Big East, here’s another example. The league received more money in 2011 in NCAA tournament revenue ($24.9 million) than it did in BCS football revenue ($21.2 million).

The Big East’s $24.9 million received from the NCAA was about $6 million more than the Big 12, the next closest conference. The NCAA basketball revenue is based on number of “tournament units.” For each round a league team advances it receives another unit. Each unit is worth about $240,000.

Even though the Big East earned the most revenue, the Big Ten had the highest per-team average at $1.67 million, followed by the Pac-10 ($1.6 million), Big 12 ($1.575 million), Big East ($1.55 million), ACC ($1.51 million) and SEC ($1.29 million).

Here’s the breakdown of the 2011 distribution of NCAA basketball revenue by conference

1. Big East $24.9 million
2. Big 12 $18.9 million
3. Big Ten $18.4 million
4. ACC $18.2 million
5. Pac-10 $16 million

6. SEC $15.5 million
7. Conference USA $6.9 million
8. Missouri Valley $5 million
(tie). Mountain West $5 million
10. Atlantic 10 $5.7 million

11. Horizon $4.5 million
(tie). West Coast $4.5 million
13. Colonial $3.3 million
14. WAC $2.8 million
15. Sun Belt $2.3 million
16. Southern $2.1 million

17. Big West $1.9 million
(tie). Ivy $1.9 million
(tie). Metro $1.9 million
(tie). Ohio Valley $1.9 million
(tie). Patriot $1.9

22. America East $1.6 million
(tie). Big Sky $1.6 million
(tie). Big South $1.6 million
(tie). MAC $1.6 million
(tie). Northeast $1.6 million
(tie). Southland $1.6 million
(tie). SWAC $1.6 million

29. Atlantic Sun $1.4 million
(tie). MEAC $1.4 million
(tie). Summit $1.4 million


Posted on: June 15, 2011 1:56 pm
 

Conference breakdown of coaches APR

Didn't get enough from my story on the top coaches ranked by their Academic Progress Rate (APR) scores, here's a comprehensive look at each coach ranked by conference.

CBSSports.com compiled the APR averages of 109 of the 120 coaches in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) using data provided by the NCAA. CBSSports.com's study is based on the NCAA's available data between 2003-04 and 2009-10 so 11 coaches debuting this season were not included. 

Below is a list of each coach by conference preceded by the coaches national rank:

Atlantic Coast

1. Dabo Swinney, Clemson 988
4. x-Paul Johnson, Georgia Tech 980
7. Frank Spaziani, Boston College 978
8. x-David Cutcliffe, Duke 976
13. Jim Grobe, Wake Forest 969
29. Jimbo Fisher, Florida State 959
30. x-Mike London, Virginia 958
33. Butch Davis, North Carolina 956
41. x-Randy Edsall, Maryland 951
(tie). x-Tom O'Brien, N.C. State 951
59. Frank Beamer, Virginia Tech 943
83. x-Al Golden, Miami 931

Big East

4. Greg Schiano, Rutgers 980
21. x-Paul Pasqualoni, UConn 964
26. y-Bill Stewart, West Virginia 960
50. Doug Marrone, Syracuse 948
54. x-Todd Graham, Pittsburgh 945
62. x-Skip Holtz, South Florida 941
74. x-Butch Jones, Cincinnati 936
109. Charlie Strong, Louisville 869

Big Ten

2. Pat Fitzgerald, Northwestern 986
13. Bret Bielema, Wisconsin 969
17. Joe Paterno, Penn State 967
18. x-Danny Hope, Purdue 966
19. x-Jerry Kill, Minnesota 965
21. Bill Lynch, Indiana 964
26. z-Jim Tressel, Ohio State 960
31. Bo Pelini, Nebraska 957
41. Kirk Ferentz, Iowa 951
51. x-Ron Zook, Illinois 946
59. x-Brady Hoke, Michigan 943
68. x-Mark Dantonio, Michigan State 939

Big 12

39. Gary Pinkel, Missouri 953
45. Bob Stoops, Oklahoma 950
48. x-Tommy Tuberville, Texas Tech 949
57. x-Art Briles, Baylor 944
62. Mack Brown, Texas 941
74. Mike Gundy, Oklahoma State 936
80. Mike Sherman, Texas A&M 933
94. x-Turner Gill, Kansas 926
95. Bill Snyder, Kansas State 925
102. Paul Rhoads, Iowa State 919

Southeastern

11. Mark Richt, Georgia 972
19. Dan Mullen, Mississippi State 965
34. x-Nick Saban, Alabama 955
41. x-Les Miles, LSU 951
57. Kentucky's Joker Phillips 944
66. x-Bobby Petrino, Arkansas 940
68. x-Derek Dooley, Tennessee 939
71. Steve Spurrier, South Carolina 937
78. x-Gene Chizik, Auburn 934
(tie). x-Houston Nutt, Ole Miss 934
James Franklin, Vanderbilt n/a
Will Muschamp, Florida n/a

Pac-12

31. Kyle Whittingham, Utah 957
34. Jeff Tedford, California 955
45. Rick Neuheisel, UCLA 950
62. Chip Kelly, Oregon 941
66. Mike Riley, Oregon State 940
71. x-Paul Wulff, Washington State 937
82. Steve Sarkisian, Washington 932
92. x-Lane Kiffin, USC 927
95. x-Dennis Erickson, Arizona State 925
98. Mike Stoops, Arizona 924
Jon Embree, Colorado n/a
David Shaw, Stanford n/a

Independents

3. Ken Niumatalolo, Navy 981
23. x-Rich Ellerson, Army 963
80. x-Brian Kelly, Notre Dame 933
89. Bronco Mendenhall, BYU 928

Mountain West

6. Troy Calhoun, Air Force 979
9. Chris Petersen, Boise State 975
16. Gary Patterson, TCU 968
26. Mike Locksley, New Mexico 960
37. Steve Fairchild, Colorado State 954
71. x-Bobby Hauck, UNLV 937
83. Dave Christensen, Wyoming 931
89. x-Rocky Long, San Diego State 928

Western Athletic

34. Greg McMackin, Hawaii 955
48. Pat Hill, Fresno State 949
54. x-Gary Andersen, Utah State 945
(tie). Sonny Dykes, Louisiana Tech 945
70. Chris Ault, Nevada 938
86. Mike MacIntyre, San Jose State 930
92. DeWayne Walker, New Mexico State 927
95. Robb Akey, Idaho 925

Conference USA

12. Bob Toledo, Tulane 970
39. George O'Leary, UCF 953
45. x-David Bailiff, Rice 950
59. Ruffin McNeill, East Carolina 943
77. Doc Holliday, Marshall 935
88. Larry Fedora, Southern Miss 929
89. x-June Jones, SMU 928
99. Kevin Sumlin, Houston 923
100. Mike Price, UTEP 920
106. Neil Callaway, UAB 904
107. Larry Porter, Memphis 903
Bill Blakenship, Tulsa n/a

Mid-American

14. x-Dave Clawson, Bowling Green 969
24. Tim Beckman, Toledo 961
(tie). x-Pete Lembo, Ball State 961
51. Dan Enos, Central Michigan 946
(tie). Frank Solich, Ohio 946
62. Bill Cubit, Western Michigan 941
103. Ron English, Eastern Michigan 918
(tie). Jeff Quinn, Buffalo 918
108. Rob Ianello, Akron 900
Steve Addazio, Temple n/a
Dave Doeren, Northern Illinois n/a
Darrell Hazzell, Kent State n/a
Don Treadwell, Miami, Ohio n/a

Sun Belt

10. Rick Stockstill, Middle Tennessee 973
37. Willie Taggart, Western Kentucky 954
74. Mario Cristobal, Florida International 936
83. x-Dan McCarney, North Texas 931
86. Larry Blakeney, Troy 930
100. x-Todd Berry, Louisiana-Monroe 920
103. Howard Schnellenberger, Florida Atlantic 918
Hugh Freeze, Arkansas State n/a
Mark Hudspeth, Louisiana-Lafayette n/a

APR rankings by conference

1. ACC 961.7
2. Big Ten 959.4
3. Mountain West 954.0
4. SEC 947.1
5. Big East 942.9
6. MAC 940.0
7. WAC 939.3
8. Pac 12 938.8
9. Big 12 937.6
10. Sun Belt 937.4
11. C-USA 932.5

x-NCAA's APR data was from coach's current and/or previous schools between 2003-10
y-Stewart resigned from West Virginia on Friday
z-Tressel resigned from Ohio State on May 30
Posted on: June 1, 2011 12:00 pm
 

Slive says back end of SEC deal tops Pac-12 deal

DESTIN, Fla. – With the Big 12 and Pac-12 recently signing monster media rights deals, is it possible that CBS/ESPN got a bargain in its media rights deal with the SEC that began in 2009?

SEC commissioner Mike Slive doesn’t think so. 

“Do I think they got a bargain?” Slive said. “I think we have secured the financial future of our institutions for a very long period of time and coupled with the incredible distribution that we have, when you think about for our ESPN deal [that] they have to televise 365 events a year, a lot of our thinking not only was revenue importance to us, but distribution was equally important.”

The SEC’s 15-year deal has been reported worth an average of $17.1 million per school annually. The Pac-12’s new 12-year deal was reported at $21 million per school annually, with an escalator clause with early payments less than $21 million per school but later payments exceeding $21 million per school.

CBSSports.com’s Dennis Dodd also reported last week the Pac-12’s media rights deal could bring the league an additional $1 billion in a seven-to-10 year period.

Slive was somewhat offended when asked if his league sacrificed money for the large distribution.   

“We didn’t sacrifice anything,” Slive said. “We didn’t sacrifice a thing. If you want to do some math you might want to compare the last 12 years of our agreement and the first 12 years of the Pac-10. I think you would be very surprised how things line up."

“But," he added, "I’m not going to give you the numbers.”

Category: NCAAF
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com