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Tag:Grant Jerrett
Posted on: August 11, 2011 4:17 pm
 

Top 100 Analysis: Questions and Answers



By Jeff Borzello

The reaction of fans is always one of the best parts of putting out player rankings. Since the concept of ranking high school prospects is completely subjective and up for debate, there is plenty of room for discussion when it comes to certain rankings. As a result, we sent out a few tweets looking for questions and reactions to the rankings. Then, we chose 15 or so that encompassed different players, teams and regions. If you were left out, ask me on Twitter @jeffborzello and I’ll answer there. Thanks!

What do you like about Jarnell Stokes over Anthony Bennett?

To me, Stokes (above) is one of the best low-post scorers in the class. He has a great body and uses his strength to finish through contact on a consistent basis. He is also a great rebounder and is improving his face-up game. Bennett shot up the rankings in the spring and summer, but I still like Stokes because of his consistency.

How does Kareem Canty fall out of the top 100?

While Canty is extremely quick and very difficult to defend, he lacks the leadership gene that elite point guards need. He sometimes makes poor decisions and turns the ball over too often. Moreover, while he is tough to stay in front of offensively, he also struggles to guard opposing point guards. His injury at NBA Camp probably didn’t help him, either.

Grant Jerrett No. 30? Was wondering what he did to drop that far.

Jerrett (right) didn’t drop that far – he was No. 22 in the pre-July rankings. He is very effective offensively, but he struggles at times to finish through contact and does get pushed around in the paint. That’s not to say he’s a bad player, though: Jerrett is still one of the best frontcourt players in the country and is going to make a big-time impact at the next level.

Steven Adams dominated at Adidas Nations. Where is he?

We only rank players that are at high schools in the United States. Word has it that Adams will attend Notre Dame Prep (Mass.) this fall, so we will get a chance to see him in November and December and will adjust for our January rankings accordingly.

How much do you factor attitude into the rankings?

Depends on the player, and how severe the attitude problem is. If he constantly berates teammates or referees to the point that it affects his game or his teammates’ games, then it will factor more into his ranking. If it’s more of a competitive streak that sometimes goes over the line, then it will be less of a factor.

What’s the Tyler Lewis fascination?

Well, Lewis did drop 21 spots, so I’m not sure there’s a fascination. But Lewis is outstanding offensively, and doesn’t back down from anyone despite his size. He has great handle and is adept at getting his shot off against any defender. Lewis has the confidence and quickness to make consistently make plays in transition or in a half-court setting.

What’s your reasoning for Brice Johnson being so high?

Johnson was unbelievable at the Peach Jam in mid-July. One high-major head coach sitting next to me thought he was a future lottery pick. Johnson isn’t great in his back-to-the-basket game, but no one’s asking him to be the next Hakeem Olajuwon. He has a very good mid-range game, and is excellent in transition. His potential is through the roof.

Marcus Paige is the No. 1 point guard for most services; why low for you, especially with performance on his bum ankle this summer?

We don’t have Paige that low – he’s the No. 3 point guard in our rankings and only six spots lower in the overall rankings than our No. 1 point guard, Kris Dunn. It’s not a knock on Paige. We just feel Dunn is more explosive and Yogi Ferrell has the potential to take over a game offensively. Paige is a great playmaker and point guard, and he will make an impact at North Carolina.

I know Butler commit Chris Harrison-Docks was in the MaxPreps Top 100 at one point. What caused him to fall out?

I’m honestly not sure when Harrison-Docks was in the Top 100, but he’s still a solid pick-up for Brad Stevens. He is a big-time competitor who doesn’t mind talking trash to opponents. He plays off his confidence, and can get hot from 3-point range when he is feeling it. His fearlessness is his biggest asset – and biggest weakness.

Rosco Allen No. 83? Seriously? Seen him play lately?

Yes, we have seen Allen lately. To us, he still needs to expand his game beyond being a 6-foot-8 outside shooter. He is not that strong or quick, and isn’t very effective playing in the paint. On the other hand, because of his size and perimeter ability, he is a match-up problem for most opponents.

So how is that Butler still can’t land a Top 100 guy?

I don’t think Brad Stevens’ goal is to land top-100 players. He goes for players that will fit into the Butler system, and he lands most of the players that he truly targets. Also, many of the players he gets are in the 125-175 region. Kellen Dunham and Chris Harrison-Docks are both very good guards – albeit with completely different personalities.

What are the chances of Maryland landing Mitch McGary?

Since the second part of this question said I couldn’t say “one out of six,” I’ll choose something else. For most of June, McGary constantly said that Maryland was coming at him the hardest – in fact, the Terrapins were one of the few colleges he would actually name. Obviously, Maryland was named into his final six, and he has already visited the school. Florida, Kentucky, North Carolina and Duke are likely to get visits soon, so we will have a better idea of where McGary stands in a couple of weeks.

Why the fall for J.P. Tokoto? I know he had a down 2010 summer but what’s the deal now? Has he actually regressed or is it just the overall quiet summer he’s had?

Received multiple questions about Tokoto. The bottom line is that players have simply caught up to him, and he hasn’t improved. Tokoto still has great athleticism and can get to the rim and finish, but he is struggling to expand his game. He lacks strength and is not a good enough ball-handler to play the point guard position full-time. Moreover, his outside shot is inconsistent, enabling defenders to play off of him. The length, athleticism and natural talent is there – but he needs to work on his weaknesses.

I was just wondering where you rank Fred Van Vleet, the point guard out of Illinois?

Van Vleet, who committed to Wichita State before the live period, had a great July. He is an absolute steal for the Shockers, as he definitely rose up the pecking order of point guards with his play during the month. Van Vleet isn’t going to blow you away with his quickness, but he gets into the teeth of the defense and creates shots for himself and teammates.

Curious to hear your thoughts on Josh Scott of Colorado. He seems to be a fast riser. Is CU getting a steal with him?

Scott is an interesting case. When we saw him at the Tournament of Champions in May, he was excellent. However, at the NBPA Top 100 Camp, he struggled mightily in nearly every game. In July, though, he was back to the form that made people so high on him in the spring. The fact is, Scott is a different player with his AAU team and is tough to evaluate in a camp setting. He scores very well around the rim and makes smart decisions in the post. Scott, along with Wesley Gordon, is a very good pickup for the Buffaloes.

Photos: Point Guard U, Cali High, ESPN

Posted on: July 26, 2011 2:07 pm
Edited on: July 27, 2011 11:36 am
 

Las Vegas Wrapup: Top Performers, Notables


By Jeff Borzello

LAS VEGAS – For five days, Las Vegas went from being the gathering place for various vices to the epicenter of AAU basketball (during the day, at least). With the Adidas Super 64 and the Fab 48, the majority of the best players and teams in the country descended on the desert for two of the summer’s best tournaments. The individual match-ups that took place at the Super 64 were unparalleled, while the Fab 48 featured plenty of top talent as well.

At the Super 64, the final four consisted of Indiana Elite, Dream Vision, Utah Pump N Run and Texas Assault. Behind the play of Jordan Loveridge, Utah Pump N Run defeated the Atlanta Celtics, Compton Magic and Michigan Mustangs in the tournament. EBC Elite made a run to the Elite Eight with upsets over Family First and DC Assault, while the Nor Cal Pharaohs also made a surprising run.

The Fab 48 was marred somewhat by two brawls, but the Cinderella stories by Wisconsin Swing and Team Breakdown to reach the Final Four were fun to watch. In the end, though, Ishmail Wainright and the KC 76ers rolled to the championship, dispatching of anyone in their path. The favorites heading into the event included the Oakland Soldiers, Belmont Shore, NJ Playaz and Mac Irvin Fire – all three were gone by the final eight, with the Soldiers and Playaz getting shocked in the playoff opener.

Top Performers

More on Recruiting

Ishmail Wainright, 2013, KC 76ers: Arguably the most impressive overall performer of the week, Wainright led his team to a surprising Fab 48 title. The muscular junior has always been a great defender and energy guy, but he carried the 76ers offensively, including getting the upper hand on Jabari Parker in a head-to-head battle.

Shabazz Muhammad, 2012, Dream Vision: Muhammad had his slow games, but overall, he again showed why he is the best player in the class. He carried Dream Vision to the title game, getting baskets in a variety of ways. Simply unstoppable when going to the rim.

Andre Drummond, 2012, Connecticut Basketball Club: When Drummond is motivated or goes against another top player, he is outstanding. He beat Kaleb Tarczewski head-to-head, adding to his hit list amongst the top big men in the country.

Javan Felix, 2012, New Orleans Elite: With the point guard class down this year, the demand for someone like Felix becomes much higher – especially when he plays like he did this week. He was knocking down shots off screens and was also getting to the rim.

Chris McCullough, 2014, Team Scan 15s: Although many people got their first glimpse of McCullough this week, he is certainly a top-10 player in his class. He is long and athletic, and has a ceiling that is simply through the roof. Raw for now, but his name will be heard for a long time.

Brandon Ashley, 2012, Oakland Soldiers: Ashley has consistently been one of the most impressive players this summer, and this week was no different. He scored around the rim, ran the floor and showed a willingness to handle the ball and knockdown face-up jumpers.

Kaleb Tarczewski, 2012, New England Playaz: Didn’t get the upper hand against Andre Drummond, but he played well the rest of the week. Most of his points come on dunks or layups around the rim, but his defense, work ethic and rebounding ability bode well.

Buddy Hield, 2012, Kansas Pray and Play Players: Overshadowed slightly by Perry Ellis, Hield was the one that shined throughout the week. Hield is a big-time offensive player that can knock down shots from behind the arc or drive the lane and finish in impressive fashion.

Denzel Valentine, 2012, Michigan Mustangs: He wasn’t that impressive at the NBPA Top 100 camp in June, but Valentine has looked good in the two Adidas events in July. He knows how to handle the ball in traffic and uses his body exceptionally well when driving the lane.

Marcus Smart, 2012, Texas Assault: Smart consistently put the Assault on his back at both ends of the floor, and his energy and nonstop motor permeated the rest of the team en route to the semifinals. Smart is an outstanding defender who has steadily improved his shooting and ball-handling 

Other Notables:

Indiana Elite made a run to the Final Four, but no one in particular stood out overall. D’Vauntes Smith-Rivera had his moments, while Jeremy Hollowell was also solid . . . Kuran Iverson is supremely talented, but his lack of interest on defense make some question his work ethic . . . With Drummond on the inside, Kris Dunn was able to make plays in transition and on the perimeter . . . For Belmont Shore, Katin Reinhardt continued to improve his point guard ability, while Grant Jerrett showed his versatile offensive game . . . New York guard Isaiah Whitehead knows how to make tough shots, plain and simple . . . Joe Rahon, the younger brother of San Diego State guard James Rahon, continues to impress. He can hit shots and run a team . . . Going up against Drummond, Coreontae DeBerry held his own defensively . . . Nate Britt again looked good, initiating offense and showing great body control in the lane . . . Kentucky native Taylor Barnette is fun to watch when his shot is falling; his range is unparalleled . . . Got my first glances at Grant Verhoeven and Christian Wood. Verhoeven is a very good defender and scores in the lane, while Wood needs room to grow but is certainly talented . . . One coach told me Chris Walker reminds him of a young Antonio McDyess . . . Charles Mitchell doesn’t have ideal size for a big man, but his hands and length make up for it . . . Mitchell's teammate, Chris Bolden, showed off an improved driving game to go with his knockdown shooting . . . 2013 forward Jordan Bell had 17 blocks in one game. That’s ridiculous . . . The attacking ability of Montay Brandon is impressive; if he gets a jumper, look out . . . One of the breakout players of the event was Jordan Loveridge, who led the Utah Pump N Run team to the semifinals – he knows how to score . . . Double Pump Elite’s Tyrone Wallace is quickly rising up the point guard ranks – he is 6-foot-4 and long . . . Texas shooter Phil Forte simply doesn’t miss . . . Team Breakdown didn’t have too many studs, but guard Brandon Channer used his strength and finishing ability to provide a boost . . . Slightly overshadowed by Chris Thomas’ antics, but Colorado commit Wesley Gordon is a big man who moves well without the ball and can finish . . . Sanjay Lumpkin is a tough matchup for guards at 6-foot-6, and also held his own against forward Gavin Thurman.

Photos: Kansas City Star (Wainwright), 247 Sports (Felix), Utah Pump N Run (Loveridge)

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com