Category:General
Posted on: January 21, 2008 1:31 pm
 

Frigid Weather & NFL Championship Sunday

I live in Chicago.  It's the upper midwest and it's freezing cold in winter.  But that doesn't stop most folks from continuing to do the things they love such as shop, bar hop, watch football games, or grill in the back yard.  This past weekend was between 0 and 10 degrees, but throw in the wind chill and most readings were negative.

So as I was doing what Chicagoans do when it's single-digit temperatures; I fired up the grill all weekend.  Regardless of the weather, it was NFL Championship Sunday I wasn't going to let the grill go unused.  Anyway, after spending about an hour outside, I began thinking about the games and the conditions.  Sure, football is played outside and therefore it's expected that you take the good weather with the bad.  But single-digit temperatures could cause problems for some people.  Least of all some of those 72K+ fans in Green Bay who probably were well-liquored for their Packer game.

Head due north for a few hours from Chicago into Wisconsin, and you'll find Green Bay.  I was certain as I was grilling that the folks in Lambeau's parking lot were doing the exact same thing.  Except there was probably a lot more whiskey involved.

The media spoke about the cold weather conditions affecting the game, but I didn't see much of it except the long passes (which there weren't many) and the kicking game (punting, kickoffs, and field goals).  The players didn't seem to affected by it.  Right?  The Giants ran the ball even though the Packers didn't.

Was there too much made of the cold?  These atheletes are paid millions of dollars to play football in any condition.  Isn't it possible that in addition to the dude who fetches Gatorade (all game long no less) or the guy who holds the cable by the coach, they might have some of the best technology on the sidelines?  I know the field at Lambeau is heated to keep it from freezing, I'm not sure if that makes a difference to the players.  But they have heated benches, heat lamps that basically create a heat zone around the whole bench, parkas, hats, etc.

Think about yourself in that situation?  Could you exercise for a few minutes, or up to 10 minutes (depending on the drive) in that kind of cold knowing that you could warm up in between sets?

The only Giants player who didn't stick around and celebrate on the field was Tynes.  And his reason, "it was cold".

Posted on: January 19, 2008 2:00 pm
 

Steroid Testing Goes Mainstream?

Those of you who subscribe to Sports Illustrated or perhaps saw something in the local paper know the story about Corey Gahan.  He's an in-line skater who at 13 years old was given steroids by his father.  Although a solid skater, and well on his way to becoming a true champion, his father felt he needed an edge.  Of course, the kid eventually fails a drug test and the hammer falls on his father and a trainer.  It's the tragic tale of an American father wanting the victory more than anything and the champion kid who ends up suffering.  And since he's so young, we won't know how much suffering there will be for quite some time.

Here's the link to the story for those who are interested in more detail: http://preview.tinyurl.com/24b3xv (tinyurl SI preview window)

On a related note, the Illinois High School Association announced on Monday that during the 2008-2009 school year, random steroid testing for high school atheletes was to commence.  There are a few other states who do this; NJ, TX, and FL for example.  I guess the important question is will that effectively combat the problem?  There is no known test for HGH so any student taking it will be ok, for now.  And with the rate of testing very minimal throughout the student population, the chances of getting caught for other performance-enhancing drugs are minimal.

Here's the link describing what's happening in Illinois: http://preview.tinyurl.com/29vwkl (tinyurl Chicago Tribune preview window)

The cynic in me says that this is only the beginning as more and more synthetic compounds and newer techniques are developed.  There's just too much money involved.  Also, younger kids are being exposed more and more and inevitably will begin using.

What's the problem?  Too much money in big time sports?  A culture or society that continually accepts pharmaceutical solutions to nature's limitations?  Or an eroding morality that permits rule infringement or less than pristine sportsmanship at the expense of true competition?

Category: General
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com