Tag:D.J. Mbenga
Posted on: October 21, 2010 11:38 pm
Edited on: October 21, 2010 11:48 pm

New Orleans Hornets 2010-2011 Season Preview

I called this past offseason for the Hornets one of, if not, the most important offseason in franchise history for the team.  Coming off of a difficult collapse in 2009, injuries to Chris Paul forced the team to fall to 37 wins last season, resulting in the team's first appearance in the lottery in three years, signifying a dramatic fall from grace following the team's 2008 run to the Southwest Division Championship and to a game 7 in the Western Conference Semifinals with the defending NBA Champion San Antonio Spurs.  Just a few years removed from that, the Hornets are at a crossroads, even after this offseason, that will determine where the team goes from this point forward.  Gone from that 2008 season are former coach of the year Byron Scott, long time General Manager and former Executive of the Year Jeff Bower and soon to be gone is the only owner the Hornets have ever known in George Shinn.  The impending sale of the team to Gary Chouest, which may not be finalized until the end of this season, will finally solidify this past offseason of change for the Hornets front office.  When new head coach Monty Williams was hired, followed by the hiring of new General Manager Dell Demps, everyone of the assistant coaches, medical staff, scouting team, etc. were let go.  Some of them had been with the team since its inception in Charlotte.  But desperate to turn a new leaf, the Hornets made their moves with Williams and Demps, and the two are young, promising guys at their respective spots with the right people vouching for their abilities.  That change was followed on the court, as the Hornets engaged in a number of trades that will result in at least eight new players making the roster for this season.  It's still very much up in the air how all of these moves will translate on the court for the Hornets.  The team has seemingly had one of the thinnest front courts in the league for years now, and that will be the same case this season.  The team's ultimate success still depends almost entirely on Chris Paul, and Paul's' reported frustrations with the team are going to loom over the franchise until he's either traded or signs a new contract.  But that's still two years from now, and the Hornets still moved along as a team dedicated to winning now.  With pending cap relief coming up this offseason, how the team performs at the start of the year will depend largely on whether they're buyers or sellers at the trade deadline and will have a huge effect on how the team opperates from here on out.  If this past offseason was one of the most important for the Hornets, this actual season will be no different.  There are no guarantees it will be the most successful, but a lot is hinging on the performance of this team this season.

For the record, new additions will be italicized and rookies will have their college statistics, which will be denoted by an asterisk.

PG: #3 Chris Paul (45 Games, 18.7 PPG, 10.7 APG, 4.2 RPG, 2.1 SPG, 84.7 FT Pctg., 40.9 3PT FG Pctg., 49.3 FG Pctg.) – Coming off of his best season individually in 2009, the frustration Paul was showing at the beginning of last season was quite evident.  He had gotten into on court altercations with Al Harrington, was frequently showing discomfort on the court and was very vocal in his displeasure with Byron Scott being fired going as far as to say the team should have consulted with him before the move.  Two separate injuries followed, including one the day immediately following Scott’s departure, possibly creating the most frustrating season in Paul’s career.  A sprained ankle and a torn meniscus kept Paul out of 37 games, and the Hornets’ win total dropped as a result. 

A lot will be asked of CP3 again this season as he enters clearly as the number one player on the team.  The fact that the team traded Darren Collison, last year’s first round draft pick and Paul’s primary back up, to make attempts in improving the roster brings further emphasis on the importance of a healthy Chris Paul.  Before his injuries last season, he was displaying an improved three point shot and was correcting all of the holes in his offensive game.  Seeing him play a healthy amount of games this season should help the team’s defense improve as well.  Paul’s on court performance is crucial for the team, but he’s in a position where he shouldn’t be asked to do as much as he was in 2009.  How quickly he gels with the new teammates, how well he’s recovered from the knee injury and how well he handles adversity this season all deserve close attention this season.

#33 Willie Green (73 Games, 8.7 PPG, 2.1 APG, 1.8 RPG, 83.3 FT Pctg., 34.6 3PT FG Pctg., 45.7 FG Pctg.) – Whether Hornets fans like it or not, Green enters this season as the Hornets back-up point guard.  Green, in the final year of his contract, was picked up in a trade with Philadelphia and immediately became the team’s most trustworthy option as a reserve point guard.  Whether or not he’s a true point guard, whether or not he’s efficient enough to run an offense for an extended amount of time and whether or not the team hopes to deploy him in this role all season are questionable.  Even with Green on the roster, the Hornets had Jannero Pargo, Mustafa Shakur, D.J. Strawberry and, eventually, Curtis Jerrells all in training camp to compete for the reserve point guard job.  In my opinion, the team wants one of the young guards to step up and claim the back-up job, but is keeping Green as a safety net.  Green is a capable back-up in this league.  He shoots a decent percentage and he could, at the very least, provide veteran experience as a reserve to start the season.  However, I’d imagine the team truthfully wants Jerrells to claim Green’s spot by December or January.

#0 Curtis Jerrells * (39 Games, 16.3 PPG, 4.9 APG, 4.5 RPG, 1.5 SPG, 77.1 FT Pctg., 36.7 3PT FG Pctg., 42.7 FG Pctg.) – Although last year was Jerrell’s first year in the league, he spent the majority of the season in the NBA’s D-League and therefore retains rookie eligibility in this season, his first with the Hornets.  Jerrells went undrafted in 2009 and spent last season for the D-League’s Austin Toros, which happened to be the team that Demps GMed while he was working for the Spurs organization.  About a week ago, the Hornets acquired Jerrells for a second round draft pick from the Spurs and he figures to be in the team’s future plans.  Former coach Greg Popovich has gone on record as saying Jerrells is a “real NBA point guard” and the team is high on him as well.  Whether or not he reciprocates those expectations right away remains to be seen, but there are high hopes for Jerrells in terms of his future as a reserve for the team behind Chris Paul.  His progression is something to keep an eye on. 

SG: #8 Marco Belinelli (66 Games, 7.1 PPG, 1.4 RPG, 1.3 APG, 83.5 FT Pctg., 38.0 3PT FG Pctg., 40.6 FG Pctg.) – No member of the Hornets roster is having as productive a preseason campaign as Belinelli.  Acquired from Toronto for the frustrating unproductive Julian Wright, Belinelli has also struggled with expectations throughout his career and really disappointed in Toronto last season.  But the team planned for Thornton to come off of the bench all along, and Belinelli has gone through a lot of the sets with the first team.  He’s shooting the ball really effectively from beyond the arc in the preseason and is showing capabilities as a ball handler that people expected of him when he was a lottery pick in 2007.  He unquestionably now enters the season as the Hornets starting shooting guard and can develop into a real wild card for the team.  If he builds off of his promise early, then the Hornets can have a surprisingly efficient starting five with an explosive Marcus Thornton as a change of pace reserve for the second unit.  At worst, Belinelli figures to be a three point specialist for the team, but all hopes are for Belinelli to remain as the team’s starting shooting guard for the duration of the season. 

#5 Marcus Thornton (73 Games, 14.5 PPG, 2.9 RPG, 1.6 APG, 81.4 FT Pctg., 37.4 3PT FG Pctg., 45.1 FG Pctg.) – Contrary to Belinelli, Thornton is having one of the most disappointing preseason campaigns for the Hornets.  Coming off of a surprising rookie season where the Hornets saw him emerge from second round draft pick to solid reserve to key contributor down the stretch, the team hopes to deploy him in a sixth man role similar to that of Manu Ginobili, Jason Terry or Jamal Crawford’s.  All hopes should, and most likely are, for Thornton to finish games for the Hornets but the team wants to use his playmaking and explosiveness to spearhead the second unit.  Thornton has struggled with his shot all preseason, and questions are already rising about the shin injury that forced him to leave the Summer League early.  But still, the team will take its chances with Thornton as the season approaches and his efficient shooting from last season will be expected and should truly benefit the team moving forward.  At only 23, Thornton is still in the team’s future plans.  He’s been vocal about his struggles with the team moving Collison to Indiana in an offseason trade, but I wouldn’t attribute that with his early season struggles.  He seems erratic out there and may be struggling with the added expectations.  I expect him to settle into his new role this season after a few games.

SF: #1 Trevor Ariza (72 Games, 14.9 PPG, 5.6 RPG, 3.8 APG, 1.8 SPG, 64.9 FT Pctg., 33.4 3PT FG Pctg., 39.4 FG Pctg.) – Coming off of a season where he was a key member of a Lakers starting line-up that won the 2009 NBA Championship, Ariza was handsomely compensated by the Houston Rockets last season and, with the injuries to Tracy McGrady and Yao Ming, was quickly given the role of the go-to guy on the team.  Ariza struggled in that role, however, as his efficiency and his shooting percentages decreased across the board.  The Hornets still see his potential as a defensive specialist and fast break partner with Paul to trade All-Rookie First Teamer Darren Collison to acquire Ariza.  In doing so, the Hornets assume the remaining four years on Ariza’s contract and are vocal about him being in the team’s future plans.  In New Orleans, Ariza can return to being the third or fourth option on a team, a role he’s probably better suited for, and should be able to prepare for the shots to come to him as opposed to looking for them.  He may never shoot at that consistent three point rate that he did in the 2009 postseason, but he’s still a capable player behind the arc who the team can feel comfortable enough with to help spread out a defense.  Ariza is the big acquisition for the Hornets this past offseason and a lot is expected of him.  He’s shown before that he’s capable of playing off of a great player, and if he does so at a more efficient rate than he did with Houston last year, the Hornets will benefit greatly because of it. 

#16 Peja Stojakovic (62 Games, 12.6 PPG, 3.7 RPG, 1.5 APG, 89.7 FT Pctg., 37.5 3PT FG Pctg., 40.4 FG Pctg.) – Signed to a five year, 65 million dollar contract in 2005, Peja has seen his points per game average and a lot of his percentages decline every year of his contract with the team.  The Hornets see his expiring 15 million dollar deal as a huge trading piece should the team find another franchise desperate for cap relief, but also see his importance as a three point specialist with the squad.  Even with his declining numbers, the Hornets are a better team with Peja on the court.  Last year’s 14-23 record without Chris Paul should be viewed with an asterisk.  The team was 9-8 without Paul on the court while Peja was still in the lineup.  When Peja missed the final 20 games of the season, the team went 5-15.  He’s still a very important player for this team.  Peja was tried as a reserve last year when the team unsuccessfully attempted to make Julian Wright the starting small forward.  He was still efficient enough in his reserve role where the team should feel comfortable deploying him in that same spot this season, but his back still brings questions about how well he can come into a game and be effective after extended periods of rest.  Whether or not he’s a key contributor or nothing more than an expiring contract to either be traded or absorbed internally this season depends largely on how well he starts the season.  He’s played a sufficient amount of minutes this preseason and is still showing his range, but nothing is a guarantee in terms of his longevity of health. 

#20 Quincy Pondexter(36 Games, 19.3 PPG, 7.4 RPG, 1.8 APG, 1.3 SPG, 82.7 FT Pctg., 35.3 3PT FG Pctg., 52.8 FG Pctg.) – Acquired in a draft night trade along with Craig Brackins for the draft rights to Cole Aldrich, Pondexter was supposed to enter this season with Brackins as two young, capable players in a new Hornets rotation.  Brackins was traded in the Willie Green trade with Philadelphia, and the Hornets soon acquired Trevor Ariza, halting Pondexter’s quick ascension to an everyday status.  Pondexter is still a capable player.  He can run the floor really well, is a good enough playmaker at his position and is a capable jump shooter.  The team also has high hopes in his defensive ability.  He showed a lot of potential in the summer league, especially with his playmaking and defense, and will be brought along slowly for the Hornets.  With Peja most likely gone either before the end of this season or by the end of this season, Pondexter figures into the Hornets future plans.  Monty Williams has had success with SF projects before during his tenure in Portland, and Pondexter will be exactly that for most of this season.

PF: #30 David West (81 Games, 19.0 PPG, 7.5 RPG, 3.0 APG, 86.5 FT Pctg., 50.5 FG Pctg.) – The Hornets longest tenured player (he’s the only player on the team that was with the franchise before the temporary two year relocation to Oklahoma City and who was with the Hornets when they still played in the Eastern Conference), West returns this season still as the Hornets second option.  For the past five seasons, Paul and West have been the go-to guys for setting the tone on offense and the same will be expected this season.  Despite a second consecutive season in terms of a decrease in his points per game and rebounds per game averages, West assumed a bigger role in the offensive execution once Paul went down to injury last season.  As a result, West saw a career high in assists.  Whether or not his game is ready for a steep decline is up for debate, and this being basically a contract year for West (he has a 7 million dollar player option for next season), one could assume that West will be at his best for one last pay day for his career.  West is still an efficient option in the offense.  He shot at a 50 percent rate last season and still has plenty of range on his jump shot.  His defense on the ball struggled big time last season and a lot of that probably had to do with Collison and Thornton’s inexperience on defense allowing so many easy drives to the basket last year.  But if West can hold his ground defensively in the paint, it would set the tone for the rest of the team.  A lot will be expected of West, again, this season.  I wouldn’t be so concerned with his missing games this preseason (Monty is said to be caution with minutes to his starters in the preseason) and I wouldn’t say he’s ready for a decline in production just yet. 

#14 Jason Smith (56 Games, 3.4 PPG, 2.4 RPG, 69.0 FT Pctg., 43.1 FG Pctg.) – Acquired in a trade that sent Craig Brackins and Darius Songaila to Philadelphia, Smith was seen as a disappointing first round project in Philadelphia but has been given new life in New Orleans.  He’s surprised many fans with his strong play in the preseason, showing a very unexpected rebounding rate per minute and still showing a good enough mid range game that the team touted when he was acquired.  Whether or not that carries over into the regular season is huge for the Hornets, as Smith is basically the only option as a reserve power forward.  His position on the team is very creaky for the Hornets, as he’s not done a lot to calm worries about his consistency and reliability in his two years with the league.  But the front office is praising Smith for his work this preseason and he’ll at least be given a clean slate in New Orleans this year.  If he struggles, the team will be left without many options for the front court, and could be forced to move Stojakovic for another option.  Whether or not Smith can prevent the team from having to go to those measures remains to be seen. 

#44 Pops Mensah-Bonsu (20 Games, 1.9 PPG, 1.8 RPG, 54.2 FT Pctg., 39.4 FG Pctg.) – With the team on a non guaranteed contract, Mensah-Bonsu will probably be retained due to the team’s thin options at the power forward spot.  Another D-League player for the Austin Toros, Pops has played well enough in the preseason to at least get a look in the regular season.  He’s struggled to stick with any of the teams he’s played with for his career but has shown signs of being a viable reserve big man.  Whether or not he can parlay that into a consistent run or even a consistent season with New Orleans is questionable at best and realistically unexpected.  But because Jason Smith is the only other option as a reserve power forward, I’d expect Mensah-Bonsu to make the roster and at least get a chance to establish himself in the team’s rotation.

C: #50 Emeka Okafor (82 Games, 10.4 PPG, 9.0 RPG, 1.5 BPG, 56.2 FT Pctg., 53.0 FG Pctg.) – Acquired last offseason from Charlotte, Okafor came into New Orleans with a lot of expectations and didn’t deliver on any of them.  Whether it be because of injuries keeping him from training camp reps with the roster, him missing the entire preseason, him never developing a rapport with Paul, him being in and out of Jeff Bower’s rotations or any combination of those things, Okafor saw a career low 29 minutes per game last year and his production dropped as a result of it.  This offseason, however, Monty has said to be committing to getting Okafor the ball at a more consistent rate.  He’s still not going to blow anyone away as a low post option, but he’s durable and strong enough to where he can hold his own down in the paint and also be a viable defender around the rim.  He’ll never live up to his paycheck, but he is still an efficient enough option at the center position in the league and is arguably a top ten player at his position.  With Williams’ dedication to getting Okafor involved more with the team, we should see a more lively Okafor and, certainly, a more productive Okafor on the court for the Hornets.  A big season from him could make all the difference from this team being a fringe playoff contender to a very good Western Conference squad. 

#34 Aaron Gray (32 Games, 3.2 PPG, 3.3 RPG, 71.4 FT Pctg., 51.2 FG Pctg.) – Acquired from Chicago during last season for Devin Brown, the White Panther (as he’s affectionately known amongst Hornets fans), became the team’s best option as a reserve center immediately and did a fine enough job in that role to be given a new one year deal to keep the same position this year with the Hornets.  Gray is, at the very least, a big body down in the paint, although his lack of speed still allows elite centers that extra burst to the basket more often than not.  He lost a lot of weight this offseason (rumored around 30 pounds) and is still light on his feet and is good enough at holding his position around the basket, but Monty has been vocal in his desire for Gray to be quicker up and down the court.  Whether or not he can really change something like his speed remains to be seen, but Gray is still a good, if not very good, back-up center for the team.

#28 D.J. Mbenga (49 Games, 2.1 PPG, 1.8 RPG, 47.4 FT Pctg., 46.6 FG Pctg.) – Recently signed to a one year contract for this season, Congo Cash (the name his former Lakers teammates gave him), steps in as competition for Gray for the reserve center job.  Mbenga has had his cup of tea in the league.  He’s mainly a hustle guy, has never been a consistent player in a rotation, but at least has two championships with the Lakers to show for his stay in the league.  He’s 7 foot and he’s a decent rebounder, but I’m not sure how successful the team will be with Mbenga consistently getting heavy minutes.  At the very least, he’s a body to push Gray and keep him staying in shape and keep him competitive.  He’s another big body on the team, giving them three 7 footers on the bench.  Only problem is, none of the three seven footers are all that incredibly talented.

Head Coach: Monty Williams (First Head Coaching Job) – Monty Williams is the youngest head coach in the league.  While that’s pretty cool in terms of the potential stability he can bring to the team, realistically you have to expect some growing pains from a guy in his first year on the job.  He’s got an impressive pedigree.  After retiring as a player, Greg Popovich himself sought out Monty to be an assistant, and Monty won a ring as a member of the coaching staff for the 2005 Spurs team.  He’s done fantastic in terms of player development and defense for the past couple of years in Portland, and he’s a very young, very hungry, very promising head coach.  All things considered, he seems like a very good guy for the job.  He’ll have to deal with Chris Paul’s ego, he’ll have to deal with a roster that’s fairly young and inexperienced, and he’ll have to do it in his first year.  However, if everybody comes together really early, it’s nothing but a huge sign moving forward for the potential of this team.  I have faith in Monty’s abilities as the head coach.  But, being that it’s his first job, you still don’t really know what to expect.  Here’s to a promising first season.

Overall: The Hornets are bringing in eight new players this season.  Chemistry may be a very tough problem in the early stages of this season, but the team is young and talented enough to get past that.  If they hit a prolonged rough patch, we’ll see if anyone starts pouting, if Williams becomes inconsistent with his rotations, etc.  There are a lot of question marks with this team.  But the potential is there.  The way it’s assembled, this team isn’t a championship squad.  They simply don’t have the length to compete with the best teams in the league.  But they’re athletic enough to hustle on defense, talented enough to get the ball in the basket and, if healthy, they could really surprise teams this year.  People always write the Hornets off as some kind of one year fluke.  It should be noted that the only year the Hornets have not had any major injury problems in the past five years was that 2008 season.  Maybe that does or doesn’t mean that the team competes for the division title again, but there’s no reason that can’t be a realistic goal.  The Spurs, Rockets and Mavericks are obviously sexier choices for the division title, but the Hornets have the bodies to compete with any of them, and they have the best individual player out of any of those teams on their roster.  Paul’s attitude and commitment are huge, as is Monty’s ability to handle all of the new players on the roster.  But if this team gets off to a huge start, they could really do some damage.  Probably no more than a 5 seed or so, but definitely a playoff team none the less.  They’re most likely another year away from being serious threats, but that’s no reason that the team can’t be really good this year.
Posted on: May 21, 2010 1:46 pm
Edited on: May 21, 2010 1:50 pm

Top Ten Drafts Last Ten Years: # 6

I figured since I didn't do a playoff preview this season for each team as I did last year, I'll do a fun little countdown to this year's draft, since that's where my team is going to be instead of the postseason.  Would I be called a woman if I let you all know that I'm a little indecisive again?  After writing out an analyzing yesterday's submission, I kind of fell in love with that draft and wanted to immediately swap with this one at #6.  This is only the second time (out of five freakin' submissions) that I've wanted to switch something, right?  Not too bad?  Anyways, coming in at #6 on our countdown is the 2002 NBA Draft which features one of the most hyped foreign projects of all time, one of the greatest colleigate players of all time and a draft that, overall, followed 2001's trend and set a record with 17 international picks.  So here's numer six on our countdown.

Top Ten Drafts of the Last Ten Years
#10: 2000 NBA Draft: http://www.cbssports.com/mcc/blogs/

#9: 2007 NBA Draft: http://www.cbssports.com/mcc/blogs/

#8: 2006 NBA Draft: http://www.cbssports.com/mcc/blogs/

#7: 2001 NBA Draft: http://www.cbssports.com/mcc/blogs/

#6: 2002 NBA Draft:

Round One:
1) Houston Rockets - Yao Ming, C, China
2) Chicago Bulls - Jay Williams, PG, Duke
3) Golden State Warriors - Mike Dunleavy, Jr., SF, Duke
4) Memphis Grizzlies - Drew Gooden, PF, Kansas
5) Denger Nuggets - Nikoloz Tskitishvili, C, Georgia (the country)
6) Cleveland Cavaliers - Dajuan Wagner, SG, Memphis
7) New York Knicks - Nene Hilario, C, Brazil (traded to the Nuggets)
8) Los Angeles Clippers - Chris Wilcox, PF, Maryland
9) Phoenix Suns - Amar'e Stoudemire, PF, Cypress Creek High School
10) Miami Heat - Caron Butler, SF, UConn

Overall, not a bad list of top ten players here at all.  It's not overwhelming, but it's pretty good.  Yao Ming came in with a lot of hype surrounding his 7'6" frame and the fact that he was from China.  He immediately took the league by storm, appearing in plenty of commercials and starting in the All Star game (because the fans in China voted for him of course) and has eventually become a great player for the Houston Rockets, although he's shown a tendency to be injury prone the last six years and may never play again because of feet injuries.  Jay Williams was such a terrific college player and you had to see him to understand how good he was.  He had a very inconsistent rookie season in Chicago before nearly losing his life in the offseason during a motorcycle crash (which voided his contract) that resulted in him shattering his pelvis, severing a main nerve in his leg and three torn ligaments including the ACL.  The Bulls were very classy about it and continued to pay him even though he was in direct violation of his contract by riding the bike.  Eventually, though, they released him the next season and Williams, although he tried, has never played in the NBA since.  Dunleavy has always been a good, never great, player that was run out of Golden State for his inconsistencies and has been the same inconsistent player in Indiana.  Gooden has managed to be a nice player in the league although he's already been with eight teams in his career.  Tskitishvili is one of the biggest busts in draft history and was just a horrible player on the court, only lasting four years in the league.  Wagner showed a lot of promise his rookie season as being an explosive scorer but suffered from ulcerative colitis and then had his entire colon removed before finally finding himself out of the league.  Nene was traded to the Nuggets and was instantly a very fun player to watch.  He's had problems with injuries his whole career but has still managed to be an effective and efficient player in the league.  Wilcox, meanwhile, has showed some promise but has never, ever put it together on the court.  He's still in the league, though.  Stoudemire was a big risk for Phoenix but he stepped in and showed a lot of potential right away.  He's now one of the big prized free agents in 2010.  Caron Butler, meanwhile, probably had the best rookie season out of all of them on a bad Miami team.  Butler's managed to become a really good player in this league as well. 

11) Washington Wizards - Jared Jeffries, PF, Indiana
12) Los Angeles Clippers - Melvin Ely, C, Fresno State
13) Milwaukee Bucks - Marcus Haislip, PF, Tennessee
14) Indiana Pacers - Fred Jones, SG, Oregon
15) Houston Rockets - Bostjan Nachbar, SF, Slovenia
16) Philadelphia 76ers - Jiri Welsh, SG, Czech Republic (traded to the Warriors)
17) Washington Wizards - Juan Dixon, SG, Maryland
18) Orlando Magic - Curtis Borchardt, C, Stanford (traded to the Jazz)
19) Utah Jazz - Ryan Humphrey, PF, Notre Dame (traded to the Magic)
20) Toronto Raptors - Kareem Rush, SG, Missouri (traded to the Lakers)

This is where the draft takes a horrible turn for the worse.  There isn't one good thing I can say about this entire bunch, except that Juan Dixon was a great colleigate player who, like Williams, you had to see to understand how good he was.  Jeffries and Dixon joined Washington as experienced college players after Washington was so criticized for the Kwame Brown selection the year prior.  However, they showed that experience isn't everything as Jeffries struggled to find a place in the league and eventually would up in New York on a very publically criticized contract.  Dixon, meanwhile, bounced around the league as a shooting specialist but is now no longer employed by the NBA.  Melvin Ely was lauded as being a great low post scorer but he couldn't do much more and he's no longer in the league.  Haislip has bounced in and out of the NBA his whole career and even had a stint with the Spurs this year before being cut.  Fred Jones participated in and won the 2004 Slam Dunk Contest, but that became the highlight of his career.  He's no longer in the league either.  Nachbar had some good years with the Nets and Hornets before going back to play overseas in 2008.  Welsh had his cup of tea as a shooter before fizzling out of the league by 2006.  Both Humphrey and Borchardt were traded for eachother, and neither team got anything out of them.  Borchardt and Humphrey both were out of the league by 2005 and showed absolutely nothing but his size.  Meanwhile Rush was seen as a three point specialist and has found a way to poke his head in and out of the league because of it but hasn't been a consistent rotation player since 2008 and is currently a free agent.

21) Portland Trail Blazers - Qyntel Woods, SF, Northeast Mississippi Community College
22) Phoenix Suns - Casey Jacobsen, SG, Stanford
23) Detroit Pistons - Tayshaun Prince, SF, Kentucky
24) New Jersey Nets - Nenad Krstic, C, Yugoslavia
25) Denver Nuggets - Frank Williams, PG, Illinois (traded to the Knicks)
26) San Antonio Spurs - John Salmons, SG, Miami (FL) (traded to the 76ers)
27) Los Angeles Lakers - Chris Jefferies, SF, Fresno State (traded to the Raptors)
28) Sacramento Kings - Dan Dickau, PG, Gonzaga (traded to the Hawks)

Save for a couple solid names, this draft, again, takes a huge turn for the worst.  Woods received a lot of Tracy McGrady comparisons but his legal problems only contributed to the "Jail Blazers" monicker and he was evnetually out of the league by 2006.  Jacobsen could do absolutely nothing but shoot and, as a result, was out of the league by 2005.  Tayshaun Prince has managed to become a consistent, steady defensive player.  He was eventually named a starter in his second year in the league where he won an NBA Championship with Detroit and has even won a Gold Medal with the 2008 USA Olympic Team.  Krstic showed a lot of promise in New Jersey before leaving to play overseas in 2008.  However, he came back just a few months later with the Oklahoma City Thunder and is now their starting center.  Frank Williams was involved in the draft night trade that brought Nene to Denver but Williams didn't have any success in New York and was out of the league by 2005.  Salmons has managed to become a really good player in the league, adding a three point shot to his ability to finish around the rim and has made a nice name for himself.  Conversely, Chris Jefferies had no success in Toronto, barely cracking the rotation and was gone by 2004.  Dickau being traded on draft night started a trend for him as he was traded eight different times (having his best season with that awful 2005 Hornets team) in his career but didn't get the hint and managed to stay in the league until 2008.

Round Two Notables:
30) Chicago Bulls - Roger Mason, Jr., SG, Virginia
33) Milwaukee Bucks - Dan Gadzuric, C, UCLA
34) Cleveland Cavaliers - Carlos Boozer, PF, Duke
40) Washington Wizards - Juan Carlos Navarro, PG, Spain
41) Milwaukee Bucks - Ronald Murray, SG, Shaw
45) Memphis Grizzlies - Matt Barnes, SF, UCLA
49) Boston Celtics - Darius Songaila, PF, Lithuania (traded to the Kings)
52) Miami Heat - Rasual Butler, SG, La Salle
55) San Antonio Spurs - Luis Scola, PF, Argentina

The second round, meanwhile, brings a bunch of names that probably trumps anything outside of Tayshaun Prince or Salmons drafted from 11-28.  Mason bounced around the league a little bit before finding a home in San Antonio last season.  However, he regressed this season and his future with the team is unknown.  Gadzuric has become an object of scorn in Milwaukee for his contract but, alas Bucks fans, the contract is expiring at the end of next season.  Boozer meanwhile had a great second season in Cleveland, was allowed out of his contract so that he could sign for a big deal with the Cavaliers, but then signed a bigger deal with the Utah Jazz, shocking the entire city of Cleveland.  Watch out y'all; he's a free agent this summer too.  Juan Carlos Navarro did not arrive in the NBA until 2007 and by then his rights were traded to the Memphis Grizzlies.  He made the NBA All-Rookie Second Team that year but didn't like it in the NBA, took a buyout and went back overseas.  Ronald "Flip" Murray has managed to bounce around the league as a good sixth man option and has been a good scorer for some decent playoff teams.  Matt Barnes took awhile to stick in the NBA but finally made himself a name in Golden State in 2007 and has, since, been a solid rotation player in the league.  Songaila had some good years with the Kings and a really good one year in Chicago before signing a huge deal with Washington.  He's still a solid rotation player; now with the Hornets.  Butler eventually became a three point specialist and cracked the starting rotations in Miami, New Orleans and with the Clippers.  Scola, meanwhile, was involved in a tricky buyout situation with his Euroleague team.  After the team continued to ask for ridiculous amounts of money, the Spurs eventually traded Scola's rights to Houston where he's now become a solid starter for a couple of good Rockets teams.

Notable Undrafted Players:
D.J. Mbenga, C, Republic of Congo - Signed with the Dallas Mavericks in 2004
J.R. Bremer, PG, St. Bonaventure - Signed with the Boston Celtics
Devin Brown, SG, UTSA - Signed with the San Antonio Spurs
Reggie Evans, PF, Iowa - Signed with the Seattle Supersonics
Udonis Haslem, PF, Florida - Signed with the Miami Heat in 2003
Jannero Pargo, PG, Arkansas - Signed with the Los Angeles Lakers
Smush Parker, PG, Fordham - Signed with the Cleveland Cavaliers

Not a bad list of eligible players who went undrafted in 2002 either.  Mbenga has managed to stay in the league because of his size, and I put him on the list for all of my loyal readers who are Lakers fans.  Just to tease all my loyal readers that are Lakers fans, I also decided to include Smush Parker's name although he's no longer in the league.  He managed to start a couple seasons for some Lakers squads that made the postseason.  Devin Brown eventually became a solid rotation player in San Antonio and won a championship with the Spurs in 2005.  Since then, he's bounced around the league but is still on Chicago's roster.  Reggie Evans became known for his rebounding, tenacity and hustle and that allowed him to be a solid role player in this league.  He's currently with the Toronto Raptors.  Udonis Haslem struggled with his weight before signing on with the Heat in 2003.  Eventually, he became a starter on the Heat team that won the 2006 NBA Championship.  Jannero Pargo, meanwhile, made a name for himself with the New Orleans Hornets but then went to play overseas in 2008.  He's since come back and is now on the bench for the Chicago Bulls.  Meanwhile Bremer managed to make the NBA All-Rookie Second Team but did absolutely nothing of note after that and was out of the league by 2004.

2002-2003 NBA Rookie of the Year: Amar'e Stoudemire
All Stars from the 2002 NBA Draft: Yao Ming, Amar'e Stoudemire, Caron Butler, Carlos Boozer

2002-2003 NBA All-Rookie First Team
Yao Ming
Amar'e Stoudemire
Caron Butler
Drew Gooden
Nene Hilario

2002-2003 NBA All-Rookie Second Team
Manu Ginobili (who was originally drafted by the San Antonio Spurs in 1999 before finally signing in 2002)
Gordan Giricek (who was originally drafted by the Dallas Mavericks in 1999 before finally signing with the Memphis Grizzlies in 2002)
Carlos Boozer
Jay Williams
J.R. Bremer

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