Tag:Texas
Posted on: December 6, 2009 6:54 am
Edited on: December 6, 2009 8:05 am
 

Inside look at Nebraska's frustration

Here is an excellent look at the confusion and anger following Nebraska's 13-12 loss to Texas in the Big 12 title game. Nebraska defensive coordinator Carl Pelini yells to Texas, "You should be ashamed to accept that trophy!"
Category: NCAAF
Tags: Nebraska, Texas
 
Posted on: December 4, 2009 9:17 am
 

Gerhart wins readers' Heisman

Our armchair voters have spoken.
 
If it were up to our readers Stanford’s Toby Gerhart would get the Heisman. That’s the surprising result of the responses I got this week from approximately 150 readers.
 
I posted a request on my blog earlier this week asking readers for their five candidates.  What prompted me was perhaps the closest Heisman race in history looming with one big weekend left. Gerhart was the somewhat surprising winner, beating out Texas’ Colt McCoy. Alabama’s Mark Ingram was a distant third.
 
Gerhart will not be part of this weekend’s flourish to the finish. Stanford completed its regular season at 8-4 after a victory over Notre Dame. He finished with a flourish running for 205 yards and scoring four touchdowns (including one passing). Toby for Heisman seems to have captured the nation’s attention after the senior rushed for 1,736 yards and 26 touchdowns.
 
The tailback received 446 points and appeared on 116 ballots. He got first-place votes on 37 of those ballots. Gerhart has been a fast riser on other Heisman polls but is assumed to be at a disadvantage because his season is completed. The country may have fallen in love late.

He will still have to survive final statements from Tim Tebow, McCoy and Ingram in the SEC and Big 12 championship games.

Surprises: Tebow finished a distant fourth with only seven first-place votes … Houston quarterback Case Keenum was fifth … Nebraska defensive tackle finished seventh with more first-place votes (13) than Ingram or Tebow.
 
Thirty-four players received votes. Nine received first-place votes.
 
The top 10:
 
1. Toby Gerhart, Stanford, 446 points (37 first-place votes)
2. Colt McCoy, Texas, 398 (32)
3. Mark Ingram, Alabama, 194 (4)
4. Tim Tebow, Florida, 170 (7)
5. Case Keenum, Houston, 128 (7)
6. Kellen Moore, Boise State, 119 (4)
7. Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska, 113 (13)
8. C.J. Spiller, Clemson, 90 (8)
9. Golden Tate, Notre Dame, 22 (1)
10. Dan LeFevour, Central Michigan, 13

 

Posted on: November 29, 2009 10:08 am
Edited on: November 29, 2009 10:40 am
 

Latest Heisman Watch

It was the weekend to abuse bad defenses. Colt McCoy turned the quarterback draw into Texas’ biggest weapon. Toby Gerhart used his arm to help beat Notre Dame. That left Tim Tebow and his five touchdowns lagging behind in third place

1. Colt McCoy, Texas: Moves up to No. 1 because without him Texas would have lost to Texas A&M. Four touchdowns passing, one rushing and almost 500 yards in total offense. Texas stared into the abyss. Colt pulled it back.

2. Toby Gerhart, Stanford: The kid taking 21 units this semester – 21! – got some national TV love against Notre Dame. Charlie’s angels – they certainly weren’t demons – allowed Gerhart 205 rushing yards and three touchdowns. He also threw for a score.

3. Tim Tebow, Florida: It’s a fairly tight race when Superman throws for three and runs for two and ends up only third. Were those camera phones going off in the end zone during his final series at home? Yes, they were.

4. Kellen Moore, Boise State: The poor guy has been forgotten all year. All five of his touchdowns were needed in an 11-point victory against Nevada. The best thing: Boise is all but in the BCS.

5. Danario Alexander, Missouri: Slowly and quietly, Alexander has become the best receiver in the country. So slow that he isn't a finalist for the Biletnikoff Award. Against Kansas he caught 15 balls for 233 yards. That was the third time in four games Alexander has surpassed 200 yards. Prior to that, Missouri had three 200-yard games by a receiver in its history.

Posted on: November 28, 2009 6:38 pm
 

Boise State going to the Fiesta (tentatively)

It was like old times heading into Saturday: Oklahoma and Nebraska holding the key to the college football season.

For Boise State.

The Sooners came through for God, for country, for the Broncos who were down to their last BCS chance. Either Oklahoma beat Oklahoma State on Saturday or the Broncos might have been relegated to bowl purgatory.

For the love of all that is decent, Detroit? Really?

The BCS critics’ flamethrowers were at the ready before Oklahoma slogged through a somewhat boring 27-0 decision over Oklahoma State.

The result, though, meant a whole lot more in Idaho and in the Prairie Village, Kan. office of BCS executive director Bill Hancock than it did anywhere in Norman.
The Broncos are going BCS bowling for the second time in four years. Tentatively. The OU win knocked out Oklahoma State (9-3) and probably locked up a spot for Boise in the Fiesta Bowl against what looks like either TCU or Iowa.

Tentatively, because there is one more hurdle to clear. If Nebraska upsets Texas next week in the Big 12 title game then Boise’s spot in the BCS will be taken Texas. The Horns would most likely go as an attractive 12-1 at-large team.

For Boise, Oklahoma and Nebraska have become teams of the century. If form holds – Texas will be a prohibitive favorite next week – then all five current undefeated I-A programs would be in BCS bowls. (TCU, Cincinnati, Boise, Texas and the Florida/Alabama winner)

Relieved: BCS bosses were ready to take more hits if Boise had been shut out despite a second consecutive undefeated regular season by the Broncos.

Comatose: Oklahoma State which shouldn’t have bothered to get off the bus. With a Fiesta Bowl berth staring them in the face, the Pokes choked.

What else do you call it? Sure, quarterback Zac Robinson was banged up, but didn’t we see a former minor league pitcher Brandon Weeden rally Okie State against Colorado?

As we’ve learned, the BCS has different affects on different people.

Posted on: November 26, 2009 11:41 pm
 

Texas survives; Colt thrives

Zac Lee is no Jerrod Johnson.

At least Texas has eight days to correct what was a train wreck of a defensive performance against Texas A&M. The 39 points given up to A&M tied for the most in two years. Johnson, A&M’s quarterback, had more than 400 yards in total offense.

Lee, Nebraska’s quarterback will be the next challenge for the Longhorns who were pushed Thursday night. The Big 12 championship game should be a lot easier. As good as Nebraska’s defense is, just like with A&M it doesn’t match up athletically with Texas.

There’s too much speed, too much brawn, too much Colt. Colt McCoy, for the first time this season, revealed himself as a running threat. His Heisman candidacy took a giant leap with almost 500 yards in total offense and five touchdowns.

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: November 19, 2009 6:00 pm
Edited on: November 20, 2009 10:48 am
 

Son of Weekend Watch List

It's that insane time of year when we have been asked to pick the best players in the country -- before all the games are played.

Some awards are narrowing their lists of semifinalists to finalists after Saturday's games. That would be with two weeks left in the regular season. Those kinds of deadlines are particularly unfair especially at  quarterback and running back where there are multiple candidates.

(I never understood the whole semifinalist-finalist thing anyway. It’s just a way to string out and hype the award.)

The Heisman has always been a pet peeve for me. So much can happen in bowls that sometimes the winner is diminished (see Oklahoma’s Jason White in the 2004 Sugar Bowl) or the person who should be the real winner emerges (see Vince Young in the 2006 Rose Bowl).

But at least the Heisman gives voters enough time to wait until after all the regular-season games are played. Not so for most of the other awards, of which there are way too many.

A couple of pieces of information came across SOWWL's desk this week. The list of three finalists for the Davey O'Brien Award (best quarterback) are expected by 1 p.m. ET on Sunday. How, on Sunday, are we supposed to pick between Colt McCoy, Tim Tebow, Case Keenum, Kellen Moore, Jimmy Clausen, Andy Dalton and Bill Stull? Those are seven names that come to mind at the moment . There might be more.

Consider that McCoy and Tebow still have to play conference championship games. Moore is the nation’s most efficient passer working on an undefeated season. Dalton and Stull are among the most improved quarterbacks in the country.

I'm considering waiting at least another week to vote. If the O'Brien folks don't approve, tough spit.

The  Doak Walker Award’s list of the 10 semifinalists was released this week. The list did not include the nation’s fourth-leading rusher Bernard Pierce (Temple), the SEC's second-leading rusher Anthony Dixon (of Mississippi State, eighth in the country) or the Pac-10’s second-leading rusher (LaMichael James of Oregon).

It did include the nation’s No. 46 rusher, C.J. Spiller of Clemson who should be considered the best all-purpose runner in the country, not the best running back. 

Missouri’s Danario Alexader is fifth in catches per game and third in receiving yards per game after catching 10 balls for 200 yards against Kansas State. You won’t find him on the list of the 10 semifinalists for the Biletnikoff Award (best receiver). Three of the 10 players have been injured or left their team.

There is a safety net. Candidates can be written in, however voters are a group are traditionally lazy. They tend to vote for what is in front of them. One exception was 2007 when the Biletnikoff process was so off the mark in 2007 that Texas Tech’s Michael Crabtree won as a write-in candidate.

The main reason for these incredibly early lists is college football’s awards show. It airs the Thursday after the end of the regular season. If the awards committees want to be seen on national TV, then they have to cow tow to ESPN deadlines.

Here’s another idea: How about setting yourself apart and waiting until after the bowl season? Somehow I think some network or another would still televise the Heisman ceremony.

Etc: Cincinnati is one of the few teams that could afford having a quarterback in jail. No biggie, there’s always Tony Pike …  A loss to Ohio State would doom Michigan to its worst Big Ten finish since 1962 … Iowa (vs. Minnesota) and Penn State (at Michigan State) both need to win to stay in BCS consideration … Connecticut’s Zach Frazer has a chance this week to become one of the few players in history to play both for and against Notre Dame. Frazer transferred from ND in 2007 … Receiver Jordan Shipley will replace the suspended D.J. Monroe for Texas on kick returns this week against Kansas … Texas has scored 10 non-offensive touchdowns this season (defense and special teams). That leads the nation and is a school record … Miami’s Jacory Harris (at home vs. Duke) has thrown 16 interceptions, the most of the top 100 passers rated by the NCAA.

Posted on: November 18, 2009 12:29 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2009 3:14 pm
 

National notes

We all know that the SEC rules our lives. So what are we to make of the release this week of The Blind Side, the much-hyped movie adaptation of the famous book?

To me, it's free advertising for the coaches and schools involved. Free recruiting advertising.

Think that other coaches aren't jealous? The movie features Nick Saban (as LSU's coach), Houston Nutt (as Arkansas' coach), Tommy Tuberville (as Auburn's coach), Phil Fulmer (as Tennessee's coach) and, uh, Lou Holtz.

Sure, they're at other jobs, or out of jobs, but think about what they represent. When they watch the movie potential recruits will see the current coach of Alabama (Saban), the current coach at Ole Miss (Nutt) and a couple of out-of-work coaches who will be getting free advertising -- Tuberville and Fulmer.

I'm all for Tubby and Fulmer getting new jobs. Holtz, well, I think you know my stance on him. This is not the economy of health care, I just wonder if the rest of the SEC coaches, or the rest of college football will be so thrilled about Friday's premier.

Fiesta frolic: The Fiesta seemingly holds the fate of Boise State in the BCS. The bowl would get the second pick after the Sugar Bowl if the rankings remain the same -- Florida or Alabama at No. 1 and Texas at No. 2.

The Sugar Bowl would take the Gators-Tide loser because it would have lost its anchor team, the SEC champion, to the BCS championship game. The Fiesta would pick second because it would have lost its anchor team, the Big 12 champion (Texas). In that scenario, the only threat to the Broncos -- unless Texas is upset – is Oklahoma State. It could finish 10-2 and qualify as an at-large team.

Qualify is a relative term. It was communicated to me this week that the Fiesta Bowl considers its relationship with the Big 12 similar to that of the Rose Bowl with the Pac-10 and Big Ten. In other words, the Fiesta isn’t passing up a BCS-eligible Oklahoma State to take Boise State.

A lot has to happen: The Cowboys still have to beat Colorado and, more significantly, win at Oklahoma to finish 10-2. The Pokes would be going to Glendale having finished second in the Big 12 South with no wins over currently ranked teams.

Boise, then, has to be big Oklahoma fans on Nov. 28. If not, the at-large teams look like this: TCU, Big Ten (Iowa/Wisconsin/Penn State), SEC (Florida/Alabama) and Oklahoma State. The six other slots are taken up by the six major-conference champions.

TCU search: Sometimes you just get lucky. Nine years ago, the TCU coaching search’s was kept  small and secret. Dennis Franchione was going to Alabama. Then-TCU AD Eric Hyman was joined by NFL personnel guru Gil Brandt and TCU trustee Malcolm Louden.

They climbed into a private jet, hitting as many candidates as possible in as short a time as possible. Your loyal blogger recently obtained that candidates list:

Sonny Lubick, former Colorado State coach and former assistant at Miami
Rick Minter, former Cincinnati coach
Watson Brown, former coach at Alabama-Birmingham and current coach at Tennessee Tech
Jeff Bower, former coach at Southern Miss
Dave McGinnis, former head coach of the Arizona Cardinals and TCU grad. McGinnis is now an assistant with the Tennessee Titans.
Dan McCarney, former Iowa State coach and current defensive line coach at Florida

After running through that group, The Thoughtful Three came back and found their guy in their backyard. They picked Dennis Franchione’s defensive coordinator, a guy named Gary Patterson. Things seem to have worked out.

McGinnis never was a head coach after the Cardinals. Bower was let go at Southern Miss a couple of years ago. Brown had a mostly mediocre stay at Alabama-Birmingham. Lubick is retired. Minter left Cincinnati after 2003 and is currently the defensive coordinator at Marshall.

“I watched Gary coach the defense and I knew he was a genius,” said Hyman now the South Carolina AD.

Goodbye, Dick Tomey: The classy, accomplished San Jose State coach retired this week (effective at the end of the season) reminded of the biggest tragedy of his career.

In 1995 while coaching at Arizona, Tomey endured the death of Damon Terrell. During a preseason workout Terrell collapsed due to sickle cell trait and died about a month later. A hospital technician removed a tube leaving an air bubble in Terrell’s bloodstream. He died not from a disease but because of hospital error.

Tomey was given the news during a game that year against Georgia Tech.

“That was gut wrenching … Damon was out of the woods, he was going to recover,” Tomey said. “At halftime of the game they told me that Damon had passed away. They weren’t going to tell a anyone else, because people were watching on television. The hospital had made an error.

“I knew it and I couldn’t tell anybody. I didn’t want to be there. I didn’t want to be anywhere …  I went in the lockerroom after the game. I was about to explode. I had to tell the guys their teammate had died. It was the most gut-wrenching thing. The outpouring of affection for that young man was amazing but the circumstances were clearly the most difficult thing I ever had to deal with.”

The next week at Illinois, Arizona called timeout before the opening kickoff. They formed the letters “D” and “T” with helmets held to the sky.

Most improved: So far it’s Idaho and SMU. They’re tied. Each is five games better than last season.

Idaho has gone from 2-10 to 7-4. SMU has rebounded from 1-11 to 6-4. Iowa State’s Paul Rhoads is the most successful first-year coach to this point improving the Cyclones, 6-5, four games from last season.

 

Posted on: November 18, 2009 11:01 am
 

In need of real men at Kansas

Kansas has spent most of the second half of the season being pushed around. Who knew it was coming from the Jayhawks’ coach?

This does not bode well for Saturday’s game at No. 2 Texas. If certain Kansas players are whining about coach Mark Mangino planting one whole finger into the chest of senior linebacker Arist Wright, you can imagine them practically cowering for the Longhorns.

As mentioned, though, that cowering has been going on for a while.

None of the accusations made Tuesday by anonymous players (Wright himself was not quoted) doesn’t add up to much. The coach is mean. So what? The coach is abusive? Prove it. A finger to the chest somehow doesn’t do it for me.

Maybe that’s the point in the swirl of Tuesday’s much-ado-about-nothing claim.  Mangino made a point by putting his finger of death into the frontal area of an unprotected Wright. I’m trying to make this sound as bad as possible, because when I first read it I laughed.

Mark Mangino is going to lose his job because he jabbed a finger? Really? That’s all we know right now because no one with a set has come forward to attach their name to these claims. AD Lew Perkins confirmed he met with players Monday night to hear their concerns. They were apparently upset at the way Mangino was treating them. If you read the message boards, Mangino choked/hit/abused (pick one) a player. If you read the message boards, Mangino wasn’t going to make to Austin this week without a job.

So already, we’re out in the knee-jerk stratosphere with this one.

Where was this two years ago when Mangino was the national coach of the year leading the Jayhawks to their best season ever? Either it didn’t exist or the entire Kansas program – players included – were enablers. As long as they were winning, it was easier to put up with Mangino’s “abuse.”

So if you’re going to run to the AD you better have some solid proof and you better prove this isn’t the result of a five-game losing streak. Once again, if this was going on two years ago, where were the critics then?

Something like this has happened before. Indiana enabled Bob Knight for decades. It was only, coincidentally, when Knight began winning less that it became convenient to fire him. There was plenty of proof going back years that Knight had abused players and bullied administrators. The sad thing is there are still those today who support Knight.

I’m not comparing Mark Mangino to Bob Knight. Rather Mangino’s players look weak for doing this a few days after the fifth loss in a row. Losing breeds anger, distrust, bad moods. Mangino, like everyone else, has his bad days. Does he have a temper? Absolutely.

Once he came out of the stands to berate officials after a late hit on his son in a high school game. I’m not saying I wouldn’t do the same thing, but I’m not saying I wouldn’t if my kid was being cheap shotted. I’ll agree that the coach at Kansas can’t become the news in that situation but I’m also willing to cut him a break as a parent.

YouTube posted a video of Mangino berating a player on the sidelines. But that’s the point in the internet age. It was only an issue – just like Brandon Spikes’ eye gouge – because it was on YouTube.

It seems to me that Woody Hayes had a temper too. I’m sure Jim Tressel has one, Urban Meyer too. Oh, and Bill Self too. We just never hear about them because they win. That’s the sad thing about the whole deal. If Kansas was 8-2 instead of 5-5 would this be an issue? I’m taking bets right now that it wouldn’t.


Catch more passers, make better blocks. Practice harder, boys. If not, there’s a new name for the “team” in Lawrence. 

The Kansas Rats.

Category: NCAAF
Tags: Kansas, Texas
 
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com