Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:Kansas
Posted on: November 26, 2011 9:04 pm
 

Kansas' Turner Gill could be next to go

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- The 800-pound gorilla took on a different form Saturday night. Turner Gill’s job security was the $6 million buyout in the room Saturday at Arrowhead Stadium.

Both were hard to ignore.

There is wide speculation that Gill, Kansas’ second-year coach, will be the next major-college coach fired following Missouri’s 24-10 win over the Jayhawks. The former Nebraska star is 5-19 in two seasons in Lawrence.

Gill may be next up on the chopping block in a coaching silly season that figures to pick up momentum this week. Arizona just filled its opening. Ole Miss and North Carolina remain open. But the jobs at Illinois, Tennessee, Memphis, Arizona State and Ohio State could soon come open as well. According to reports, Urban Meyer is expected to formally announced any day as the new Buckeyes’ coach.

Kansas, at times, has been laughably bad this season finishing 2-10 while threatening to set an NCAA record for average yards allowed (531.45, last in FBS). Six of the losses were by at least 30 points.

Names being tossed around already include Mike Leach, former South Florida coach Jim Leavitt and former Arizona coach Mike Stoops. Leach still is dealing with three active lawsuits following his December 2009 firing from Texas Tech. Leavitt left South Florida after being accused of laying hands on a player. Stoops’ sideline demeanor was an issue at Arizona but his team also slumped badly toward the end. He was 41-50 in eight seasons.

“I think a positive is that our guys stuck together as a team,” Gill said after his team blew a 10-0 lead. “They were truly a team inside and outside of the lockerroom. They played their hearts out.”

It may not be enough. Gill was hired by former AD Lew Perkins and handed a five-year, $10 million guaranteed contract starting in 2010. If he were fired, Gill would be owed every cent of the remaining three years ($6 million). Some KU booster(s) will have to dig deep if they want a change. But it may be worth it at Kansas which has been able to tolerate mediocre football as long as it doesn’t embarrass the basketball program.

It is embarrassing the basketball program, gaining national attention for all the wrong reasons.

“It’s hard to turn something in two [years],” Kansas offensive coordinator Chuck Long said. 

“We all understand three [years]. We all understand that [is a key time for a coach] … But we feel like 2012, 2013 could be good years for us.”

Long has been in this situation himself. The former Heisman runner-up was 9-27 in three years as head coach at San Diego State.

“If that [two years] was the case they probably would have fired me too,” Missouri coach Gary Pinkel said. “I wasn’t the most popular guy in my first four years here … He’s [Gill] a colleague and a friend. I don’t think there is any way you can  make a decision on a program in two seasons.”

 

 

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: October 20, 2011 7:04 pm
Edited on: October 20, 2011 7:05 pm
 

Kansas' Self not worried about losing Missouri

Kansas coach Bill Self expanded on his feelings about Missouri possibly leaving the conference for the SEC. Self spoke to reporters Thursday during Big 12 basketball media day.

The coach came closer than ever Thursday to saying, “Who needs ‘em?” if Missouri leaves. He even suggested that Kansas would lose money if it played a non-conference game against its biggest rival.

“If they leave, they leave. Big deal,” Self told reporters. “You know, we don't want 'em to but if they choose to do that, they do it.

“So from our standpoint, I don't think we're going to say, ‘Aw, geez, we've got to hurry up and schedule them. I don't think anybody would feel that way. I know I wouldn't and I don't think any of our fans would.”


“I’m not saying we will [play them]. I'm not saying we won’t. I'm just saying I'm not going to make a decision on that now. I may feel that we need to continue playing them, I may feel that we don't need to continue playing them.

“I know one thing. Texas made a pretty bold statement to A&M [about the continuation of that series]. I don't know if we're in the exact same boat as that, but I really believe that what we do will not be based on what other people want us to do. It will be based on basically what's best for our program.”

I then asked Self if he had to wet his finger and check which way the wind was blowing. In other words, was this a political decision?

Self basically said KU could conceivably lose money if it played Missouri in a non-conference game at the Sprint Center, home of the Big 12 tournament in Kansas City.

“Here's the thing about that,” he said. “You play in the Sprint Center, you play Missouri. Great game. Now let's say you net $600,000 after you pay expenses to play that game. They take $300,000, we take $300,000.

“We make $500,000 playing a home game, so we just lost money. There would be a lot of different ways you could look at it

So getting $1 million total for a Missouri-Kansas game at the Sprint Center would be a “push” monetarily for Kansas?

“Maybe, yeah, yeah, maybe,” Self said.

“I want to make sure that I'm clear. I want Missouri to stay. It's best for our league if they stay. It's best for Kansas. It's best for other teams in our league if they stay.”

What about playing the conference tournament in Missouri with no team in the conference from Missouri?

“See, I think that’s also overrated on which side of the river ... I think it's Kansas City, you know, Kansas City ... I don't see that being a huge deal, where the building is located.”

Missouri's board of curators took no action Thursday during a regularly scheduled meeting on the Missouri-Kansas City campus. The school's next likely move would be to announce a formal withdrawl from the Big 12.  





Category: NCAAB
Posted on: October 5, 2011 11:29 am
Edited on: October 6, 2011 10:22 am
 

Living in the Big Doughnut Hole

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Welcome to the Big Doughnut Hole.

This used to be the center of the college universe. At least one of them. This city still has hosted more Final Fours (10) than any other. It's a Chiefs town first and a Jayhawks town second. Most of all, it's a melting pot with a sizable amount of Iowa State, Nebraska, Missouri alums here as well.

We have the NFL and Major League baseball (barely) but it's a college town more than anything. A better college town than New York or L.A. We are connected by our teams and events. They give us our sense of self.

The annual Big 12 basketball tournament is a gathering place to drink, gossip and people watch. The Missouri-Kansas football game at Arrowhead is an event that traces its roots back to the Civil War. Kansas, and all its basketball history, is 40 miles away. Bill Snyder is still working miracles down the road at Kansas State.

But with Missouri declaring its intentions to look around on Monday night, suddenly there is no center here. Just a big hole where that gathering place used to be. You can feel it. To the right of us, probably soon, will be the SEC (Missouri);  a short three-hour drive to the north of us is the Big Ten (Nebraska). To our left will be what's left of the Big 12 (Kansas and Kansas State).

Kansas City could become a great staging area for GameDay's equipment semis in the Midwest, but for the actual college experience, it's slipping away. The Big 12 tournament is now in danger. It will continue, somewhere. But it has to be hard to anchor a conference tournament in a state where the league has no teams.

The Kansas-Missouri rivalry is now in danger too. That's another shame. After the Iron Bowl and the Red River Rivalry, it is the best.

A few years ago, they moved MU-KU football to Arrowhead Stadium and it became a spectacle. In 2007, No. 2 Kansas lost to No. 3 Missouri and the Tigers became No. 1. ABC/ESPN still counts the game among its most highly-rated in history.

But like that Wicked Witch, it's all melting away. I know this because Bill Self didn't hold back Tuesday when Missouri declared its intentions

Kansas' basketball coach told the Lawrence Journal-World that the MU-KU series may be over.

" ... I don't think I would be interested in having a once-a-year game like I did when I was at Illinois, playing Missouri," Self said. "I could probably change my mind (but) trust me, we would have no trouble finding a non-league game to play.

"I love the rivalry .. but I can't imagine why would we continue playing?"

Which is sad because the basketball series goes back to 1907. The football series goes back to the 1890s. Kansas, like a lot of folks in Kansas City and the Big 12, are upset at Missouri. By taking its ball to the SEC, it would be impacting that Big 12 tournament. It would damage the Kansas rivalry.

Point being: Why put money in Missouri's pocket by playing a non-conference game?

"I have no ill will toward Missouri at all," Self said, "but to do something at a time that could be so damaging and hurtful to a group, I can't see us just taking it and forgetting ."

If this is truly the end , then someone may want to hire extra security for what could be the final regular-season Border War game in history -- Feb. 25 in Lawrence. Forget the fans for a moment, there are scores of sportswriters who would shed tears over the end of this epic rivalry.

We are losing that sense of self here in Cowtown. Clearly, Missouri administrators don't care. The SEC doesn't care. The networks will continue to televise games. They don't care.

Conference realignment goes on unabated. Traditional rivalries are being cut down like rainforests. Our natural habitat is being destroyed. Is this a good thing for college athletics? No, that's not really the point.

Interim Big 12 commissioner Chuck Neinas called modern conferences "scheduling opportunities" and "amalgamations". I called them "content farms."

Now it's hitting home. It would suck to be a doughnut hole.

 

Posted on: September 28, 2011 12:13 pm
 

We've been duped here in Kansas City

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- We were asked to vote on a new arena here in Kansas City a few years ago. The plan -- no, the promise -- was to lure a pro franchise to play in it.

That's how 72 suites were sold in a matter of months. That's what the president of arena giant, AEG, said. You can look it up. Tim Leiweke said we'd have our own franchise (NBA, NHL) when the doors opened in October 2007.

I thought about that watching a thoroughly entertaining preseason NHL game Tuesday night at that arena -- the Sprint Center here in Kansas City. The game was sold out. The hockey was fantastic, Pittsburgh over L.A. 3-2 in an eight-round shootout.

Then this morning I read the latest back track from Leiweke

"Kansas City," he told the Kansas City Star, "can take its time."

Whoa, wait a minute. Who is Tim Leiweke telling us what to do when his politicking and false promises got us to this point?

Why not just admit, Tim, that you duped us? Admit that the Sprint Center was built four years ago to become the world's largest concert hall in the first place?

Take our time? How dare you? AEG has taken out full-page ads to proclaim that it is one of the most successful music and entertainment venues in the world. Those 100 nights of Taylor Swift and Lil Wayne and Guns N Roses, may be fun but that's not why we voted $250 million for the Sprint Center.

It was for the promise of attracting a pro franchise and to keep the Big 12 basketball tournament. That second item looks kind of shaky because the Big 12 has almost broken up twice in the last 16 months. I'm sure AEG didn't count on that, but it probably didn't have a four-day, college basketball tournament at the top of its list for building for building Sprint either.

The arena was built to house acts it could funnel through Kansas City. Nothing wrong with that, but I’m trying to come up with a list of cities this size with an arena this new that don't have a pro franchise. Please, someone help me here.

I just wish they'd told us that up front. I would have had a harder time voting for a car rental and entertainment tax to watch Enrique Iglesias and the pro rodeo tour.

“Right now there is not an urgency [to get an anchor tenant],” Leiweke told the Star. “This building is doing phenomenal."

And to that I proclaim B. -- freakin' -- S. Ask the merchants across the street at the Power and Light (entertainment) District who are doing OK, but could be doing so much better with a guaranteed 41 home dates for an NBA or NHL franchise.

One of the biggest days in the P&L's short history was a crowd that gathered to watch a U.S. World Cup game there in 2010. That had nothing to do with the glittering jewel across the street, Sprint just happened to be there.

I get that there has been an economic downturn since the building opened. I get that teams aren't moving and leagues aren't expanding. That's why I feel doubly duped. Leiweke should have never made those claims when he needed our tax dollars to fund his concert hall. I feel doubly duped because Mario Lemieux and the Pittsburgh Penguins ownership group toured the construction site. It turned out to be leverage for the Penguins to get their new building.

We are a college town. Check that, we are a Chiefs and Jayhawks town. You wonder how an NHL or NBA franchise would do on nights when Kansas, Kansas State or Missouri are playing basketball. I still wonder that. I also wonder why I voted for Sprint when the plan all along was to fill it with exhibition games and the Trans-Siberian Orchestra.

Full disclosure: I loved the Paul McCartney show in 2010. At age 68, he rocked the house. Best show I ever saw. But, again, I wouldn't have helped vote $250 million for Paul McCartney either. Meanwhile, the Sonics are now the Thunder in Oklahoma City. Atlanta's Thrashers are now the Winnipeg Jets. Wait, we got scooped by OKC and Winnipeg?

"We're fine without one [anchor tenant]," Leiweke repeated, "and we probably make more money without one."

If that isn't an indication of AEG's true intentions, I don't know what is. Make money, sure? Just don't lie to us how you're going to make it. We're no closer to being a better major-league town than we were when the first shovel was stuck in the ground for Sprint. Well, unless you can't wait to see Jeff Dunham, Monster Jam and something called Nuclear Cowboyz.

It was a great night for the Kansas City hockey community on Tuesday. They got out there and sold a lot of tickets. The announced attendance of 17,779 was the most ever to watch hockey in our town.

However, it was a horrible night for the Sprint Center. When the puck dropped there were still thousands of people outside waiting to get in. Sprint/AEG apparently hasn't figured out that it needs to open more doors when there are a lot of people outside. There was literally more room marked off for smokers outside than there were for people with tickets waiting to get in.

Also, at a sold out event it might be a good idea to open all the concession stands. I missed half the game waiting in line with my son for food. At least the game presentation was good. The first period intermission featured a commercial for the 2012 Camry. One was driven on the ice, in case you didn't get that Toyota was a sponsor.

A wing-eating contest was being shown on the big screen during a face-off. The public address announcer didn't know the names of players as he was announcing goals.

I still would say the Kansas City deserves the NHL or NBA. But after the frustration of these four years, the question has changed. Does Kansas City deserve AEG?

 

Posted on: September 22, 2011 4:24 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2011 12:01 pm
 

Missouri expected to stay in the Big 12

Indications are that Missouri will stay in the Big 12, a source within the league said Thursday.

Two newspapers reported this week that Missouri seemed to be the favorite to become the SEC's 14th team. The Kansas City Star reported Missouri had an offer on the table from the SEC. The Birmingham News reported that Missouri had "informally agreed" to join the SEC.

Deaton is the current chair of the Big 12 CEOs who one Big 12 source called "an extremely honorable man". Given several chances to commit to the reconstituted Big 12, though, Deaton and other Missouri officials did not commit fully to the league at a Thursday evening press conference. Despite speculation that Deaton would step down as chairman -- a sign of Missouri's interest in the SEC -- he remains in that position as the conference seeks new members.

The Big 12 began to solifidy again this week when the Pac-12 announced late Tuesday it would not expand after widespread speculation -- some of it created by the participating schools -- that at least Oklahoma and Oklahoma State were headed west. The source said Thursday that at "all levels" -- board of curators, athletic director, etc. -- indications are that Missouri will stay in the conference that has been its ancestoral home going back to 1907. That was the year Missouri joined its first conference in the Missouri Valley along with Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Washington University.

That league eventually became the Big Six in 1929, Big Seven in  1948, Big Eight in 1960 and Big 12 in 1996. 

All of this comes with a huge disclaimer: Nothing seems to be final in conference realignment. For Missouri, joining the SEC would mean an end to some of those long-term relationships. Committing to the Big 12 would allow the league to go forward with nine teams as it seeks more schools to expand to 10 or 12 teams.

If Missouri eventually pledges allegiance then the league could move forward on Baylor and other conference schools releasing their rights of claims against Texas A&M.

It is thought that until Baylor, Iowa State, Kansas and Kansas State release those claims against the SEC, that A&M cannot join its new league. CBSSports.com already has reported that Chuck Neinas is expected to be named interim commissioner to replace Dan Beebe.
Posted on: September 22, 2011 4:24 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2011 12:01 pm
 

Missouri expected to stay in the Big 12

Indications are that Missouri will stay in the Big 12, a source within the league said Thursday.

Two newspapers reported this week that Missouri seemed to be the favorite to become the SEC's 14th team. The Kansas City Star reported Missouri had an offer on the table from the SEC. The Birmingham News reported that Missouri had "informally agreed" to join the SEC.

Deaton is the current chair of the Big 12 CEOs who one Big 12 source called "an extremely honorable man". Given several chances to commit to the reconstituted Big 12, though, Deaton and other Missouri officials did not commit fully to the league at a Thursday evening press conference. Despite speculation that Deaton would step down as chairman -- a sign of Missouri's interest in the SEC -- he remains in that position as the conference seeks new members.

The Big 12 began to solifidy again this week when the Pac-12 announced late Tuesday it would not expand after widespread speculation -- some of it created by the participating schools -- that at least Oklahoma and Oklahoma State were headed west. The source said Thursday that at "all levels" -- board of curators, athletic director, etc. -- indications are that Missouri will stay in the conference that has been its ancestoral home going back to 1907. That was the year Missouri joined its first conference in the Missouri Valley along with Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Washington University.

That league eventually became the Big Six in 1929, Big Seven in  1948, Big Eight in 1960 and Big 12 in 1996. 

All of this comes with a huge disclaimer: Nothing seems to be final in conference realignment. For Missouri, joining the SEC would mean an end to some of those long-term relationships. Committing to the Big 12 would allow the league to go forward with nine teams as it seeks more schools to expand to 10 or 12 teams.

If Missouri eventually pledges allegiance then the league could move forward on Baylor and other conference schools releasing their rights of claims against Texas A&M.

It is thought that until Baylor, Iowa State, Kansas and Kansas State release those claims against the SEC, that A&M cannot join its new league. CBSSports.com already has reported that Chuck Neinas is expected to be named interim commissioner to replace Dan Beebe.
Posted on: September 16, 2011 9:59 am
Edited on: September 16, 2011 10:02 am
 

Son of Weekend Watch List

Team/coach/player/name of the week: Iowa State/Paul Rhoads/Steele Jantz. In his three seasons the Cyclones' coach Rhoads has picked off Nebraska, Texas and, last week, Iowa in overtime.

The plucky Cyclones are guided by Jantz whose All-American name is only slightly less noticeable than his quarterback talents. Jantz went to high school in California, played scout team for a season at Hawaii, then went to City College of San Francisco before winning the job at Iowa State.

As for the name, Steele's grandmother started the tradition that carried over with his father (Fox), a brother (Wolf) and an uncle (Truk).

Rhoads has become the toast of Ames as Iowa State goes to Connecticut Friday night with a chance to go 3-0 for the first time since 2005. The former Missouri Western defensive back grew up a few minutes from Jack Trice Stadium. When Iowa State called him at Auburn following the end of the 2008 season, Rhoads would have crawled to Ames.

With conference realignment swirling, he may be single-handedly holding the program at the BCS level.


The road to Atlanta for the SEC title game goes through Nashville: Or another way to identify surprising 2-0 teams.

Vanderbilt: The administration whiffed on Gus Malzahn. James Franklin has brought a steadying hand. A 3-0 start is doable with the SEC opener at home against Ole Miss.
Kansas: A shootout win over MAC power Northern Illinois sets up Jayhawks for a trip to Georgia Tech. Two of the top passing teams in the country.
Northwestern: Dan Persa's injured Achilles could have wrecked the season. Instead the Wildcats have rallied around backup Kain Colter heading into Army.
Illinois: One of the more entertaining games of September Saturday night in Champaign vs. Arizona State.
Colorado State: For the first time since 1941 the Rams plays Colorado with a record of 2-0. For the first time since 1939, the Buffs come into this game 0-2 or worse.
Eastern Michigan: The Eagles first 2-0 start since 1986 gets a test -- a big one -- at Michigan. At least Eastern won't have to travel far from Ypsilanti to get whipped.
Washington State: Lose starting quarterback? No problem, Cougs lead the country in scoring offense.
Florida International: After beating Louisville, Mario Christobal is the nation's new "it" coach.


Scorching SEC: Now the Strength Everywhere even leads the country in scoring offense averaging 39.12 points per team. Two of the top four scoring teams include Arkansas (51.5 points) and South Carolina (50.5). The Big 12 is second at 36.66 points per team.

Best wishes: Minnesota's Jerry Kill is expected to coach Saturday against Miami (Ohio) after suffering seizures last week during the New Mexico State game. Kill has a history of seizures, one of which led to the discovery of his kidney cancer in 2005


More Bobby Bowden on Jimbo Fisher and Florida State: "Jimbo is an excellent football coach. A lot of people forget I was the one that hired him. I've known him since he was a child. He played for my son Terry in college. Terry told me 20 years ago this kid is going to be a great coach.

"I do not feel like Oklahoma's players they're superior to Florida State's. They might be more mature.
"We've been out of that [national picture] for the last 10 years. During the '90s we were up there every year. During the 2000s, we'd gone 10 wins every year for 14 years. Then we fell to eight, went to nine, went to 10. I said, 'Oh boy, we're back.' But instead we went kind of down."


Quote of the week: Tennessee's Derek Dooley describing what it means to go into SEC play (this week against Florida). "How many scars do you have?"


Meaningless stat: Wisconsin and Georgia Tech are first and third nationally in passing efficiency this week. Russell Wilson you can kind of understand making a difference for the ground-based Badgers. But Tech starter Tevin Washington has passed only 21 times in two games. (The Jackets have thrown 26 passes overall.)

Two traditional rushing powerhouses, Georgia Tech finished first and Wisconsin was 12th in that category in 2010.


Signal-stallers: Going into Week 3 Miami, Texas, Penn State and Notre Dame all have quarterback issues. Those schools have produced a total of four Heisman-winning quarterbacks.


Noting: Georgia Tech (hosting Kansas) has five plays of at least 70 yards. No other conference has produced that many ... USC (vs. Syracuse) has outscored its opponent in the fourth quarter only twice in the last 11 games ... Didn't you used to be the Holy War? Utah and BYU meet early this year due to the Cougars' move to independence and the Utes migration to the Pac-12. Something has been lost in this rivalry with no conference implications ... Jimbo Fisher claims that Doak Campbell Stadium has the most bricks of any building in North America. Will Oklahoma be another brick in the wall?


Heisman picks going into Week 3: 1. T.Y. Hilton, FIU: 2. Denard Robinson, Michigan; 3. Robert Griffin, Baylor; 4. Kellen Moore, Boise State; 5. Tyrann Mathieu, LSU.
Posted on: September 9, 2011 9:53 pm
Edited on: September 9, 2011 10:03 pm
 

Son of Weekend Watch List

This is all the stuff that spilled over from Weekend Watch List ... 


There will be plenty of opportunity for Jimbo Fisher to massage the roster in preparation for Oklahoma next week. Florida State hosts Charleston Southern which lost last week to Central Florida, 62-0...For the first time in 18 years Illinois is coming off a game in which it did not commit a penalty. It is one of three teams to go into Week 2 without a penalty. Navy and Eastern Michigan are the others ... TCU (at Air Force) hasn't started 0-2 since 1999 ... Can this be right? Virginia Tech (at East Carolina) hasn't started 2-0 since 2001...Hawaii (at Washington) is looking to start 2-0 against the Pac-12 after beating Colorado in the opener...Utah goes into the USC game with heavy hearts. The wife of Utes' defensive lineman Ron Tongaoneai was killed in a car accident following last week's season-opening win over Montana State ... With Colorado having shifted conferences, that means receiver Toney Clemons, a Michigan transfer, has played in three conferences...Iowa State has scored one touchdown against Iowa in the last 18 quarters going back to 2007...

One more thing about the new taunting rule:  Taunt your opponent on the way to the end zone and the points are taken off the board. We know that. What a lot of folks don't know is that the penalty counts as a personal foul. Two PFs and you're out of the game.

Players will be reminded of this, no doubt, but they're reminded of a lot of things: Like, how not to associate with prostitutes and greasy jock-sniffers who pop for $500 lunches. In the spirit of everything personal and foul, here are the five teams most likely to first get points taken off the board this season.

1. Arizona State: Linebacker Vontaze Burfict's nickname is not Choir Boy.
2. Baylor: Achieved a rare quadruple-quadruple -- 1,000-yard rusher (Jay Finley) and 1,007 yards in penalties to lead the country.
3. Troy: No team caused more laundry to be dropped on the field (110 penalties).
4. Ohio State: Off-field conduct carries over.
5. Miami: Do you even have to ask?


Noble pursuits:
With Jim Tressel having taken a colossal fall from grace at Ohio State, WWL thought it would be interesting to compare other recent major-college coaches who are out of the game. Compare Tressel's quality control position with the Colts (after a suspension that followed him from college) to these other accomplished coaches.

Urban Meyer (resigned December 2010), last coaching job: Florida. Currently, ollege football analyst, ESPN. NCAA reformer.
Mike Bellotti (resigned to become Oregon AD 2008. Left that position 2010), last coaching job, Oregon. Currently: ESPN analyst.
Mark Mangino (resigned under pressure, December 2009), last coaching job, Kansas. Currently, residing Naples, Fla.
Mike Leach (fired December 2009) last coaching job, Texas Tech. Currently, author of best-selling book Swing Your Sword, daily satellite radio show on SiriusXM
Jim Leavitt (fired January 2010) last coaching job, South Florida. Currently, linebackers coach, San Francisco 49ers
Dan Hawkins (fired after 2010 season) last coaching job, Colorado. Currently, ESPN analyst
Butch Davis (fired, July 27, 2010) last coaching job, North Carolina. Currently, unknown.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com