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Tag:Maryland
Posted on: September 12, 2010 11:38 am
 

The Day After in CFB

The day the ACC died: OK, maybe too harsh but it was certainly one of the worst days in ACC football since expansion.  All four ranked teams lost -- No.  12 Miami (to No. 2 Ohio State); No. 13 Virginia Tech (to James Madison); No. 15 Georgia Tech (to Kansas) and No. 17 Florida State (to No. 10 Oklahoma). The rest of the league (unranked teams) was 4-1. Overall, the ACC was 4-5.

It could get worse next week: Cincinnati plays at NC State on Thursday. On Saturday, Clemson is at Auburn, Duke hosts Alabama, BYU comes to Florida State, Maryland is at West Virginia and East Carolina goes to Virginia Tech.

Get your No. 16 jersey, while they last: If Denard Robinson isn't hot enough, check out what may be a bit of foreshadowing from the Michigan Daily.
 

YouTube sensations: The two most jaw-dropping plays of the day. Kyle Rudolph's catch and run vs. Michigan and LaMichael James' incredible run against Tennessee.

Rockin' the mic: Following an embarrassing 35-0 home-opening loss to Stanford, UCLA's Rick Neuheisel grabbed a microphone and addressed the Rose Bowl crowd. "We'll get better," he said, "We can't get any worse that we were tonight ... I promise you, we will not give up. We'll be back."

It suddenly seems like a long time since Neuheisel led a pep rally after his first game. It's been only two years.

Miami fans never cease to amaze: While there only seemed to be 3,000-5,000 in the stands at Ohio Stadium, they made themselves known. The kid at the Columbus airport was interesting. Cut into the back of his head by an enterprising barber: "U Swag"

Posted on: November 21, 2009 3:19 pm
 

Early notes

How do we evaluate Tebow and Ingram today playing against air? Tebow threw for a couple of touchdowns and ran for another against Florida International. Ingram ran for 102 yards and two touchdowns in limited action against Chattanooga.

Good Lord, it looked like a Utah State game at Doak Campbell. Not FSU playing Utah State, a game AT Utah State. There have to be at least 30,000 empty seats. Florida State survived Maryland 29-26 meaning Bobby Bowden will probably return in 2010 for a grandiose farewell tour.

Rich Rod will be back too at Michigan. You give him another year after the 21-10 loss to Ohio State. Then you let the new AD, whoever that is, make the decision. Bill Martin won't be gone until June and is on record as supporting Rodriguez. The problem is, Michigan most likely is going to have change cultures again if it makes a change. Summary: Don't look for the Wolverines to be in the national picture for at least the next four years.  

Posted on: October 21, 2009 12:18 pm
Edited on: October 21, 2009 12:28 pm
 

BCS commissioners weigh a CEO/coordinator dude

If you read Wednesday’s AP story, you know that the BCS commissioners don’t know what they want.

The title of “coordinator” of the Bowl Championship Series has been a sentence, not a position. The commissioners look forward to the one-year term of BCS coordinator about as much as a trip to the NCAA infractions committee.

They’ve talked intermittently about hiring an outside person to take over the day-to-day administration of the controversial system. They sure as hell don’t want to do it. What does that say about the system itself? You could put a pistol to my head and I couldn’t tell you what the “BCS coordinator” does. It’s a title emptier than Bud Selig’s head when it comes to replay.

The issue was coming to a head because Big East commissioner John Marinatto is due to take over as coordinator in January. He is a “rookie”, in his first year as commissioner. His fellow commissioners don’t want a rook taking over but that’s part of the problem. The Pac-10 and Big Ten commissioners don’t want the title at all. That eliminates three of the six BCS commissioners.

The Big Ten’s Jim Delany and just-retired Pac-10 commissioner Tom Hansen never served. Like a lot you, their league presidents are adamantly opposed to the system.

ACC commissioner John Swofford and SEC commissioner Mike Slive -- guys who actually served -- have had a hard time being coordinator. They have presidents within their conferences who are opposed to the BCS – Florida State president T.K. Wetherell in addition to Florida’s Bernie Machen and Georgia’s Michael Adams.

If the commishes do hire an outsider, they’ve got to decide to spend the money. Take it from me, they’re going to get some blow back from the schools if they pay someone like Archie Manning or Condoleezza Rice half a million a year. The money they’re producing is supposed to go directly to the schools.

What could an Archie or Condie do, really? They would be figureheads trying to sell snow to the Eskimos. But at least they’d be figureheads who could push the BCS with a clear conscience. That’s something Condie couldn’t do with her Bush Push of the presidential agenda.

We’ve already heard “No New Taxes”. Pardon us if we ignore cries of “Know Your Texas”.

I’ll take Archie as the first father of football. As a parent, he produces great quarterbacks. As a BCS flak, he'd probably become just as confused as the rest of us.

That’s why the commissioners don’t know what they want to do. It’s a job they don’t want, but who does?

Stat package

(Stuff that didn't fit on Wednesday's story on the halfway point)

These are your leaders in these categories halfway through the season:

Rushing: Nevada, 292.83 yards per game
Passing: Houston, 431.5
Total offense: Houston, 560.3
Rushing defense: Texas, 35.8
Passing defense:  North Carolina, 125.1
Fewest turnovers: Air Force, Cincinnati, Oregon State, four each
Most turnovers: Miami (Ohio), 26
Individual rushing: Ryan Mathews, Fresno State, 162.3
Pass efficiency:  Kellen Moore, Boise State, 171.8
Receiving yards per game: Dezmon Briscoe, Kansas, 134.2 yards
All-purpose running: Torrey Smith, Maryland, 207.71
Tackles: Carmen Messina, New Mexico, 13.33 per game
Interceptions: Robert Johson, Utah; Earl Thomas, Texas; DeAndre McDaniel, Clemson; Rahim Moore, UCLA; Tyler Sash, Iowa, all tied with five

 

Posted on: October 13, 2009 9:26 am
Edited on: October 13, 2009 3:07 pm
 

Locksley suspended one game

New Mexico coach Mike Locksley reportedly has been suspended one game by the school for punching an assistant coach.

Locksley punched J.B. Gerald during a Sept. 20 meeting. New Mexico AD Paul Krebs issued verbal and written reprimands to Locksley, in his first season, before the university got involved. A formal investigation resulted in Tuesday's move. A formal announcment from the school is expected to come later today, according to the report. Locksley will miss the Oct. 24 game against UNLV.

It has not been an easy first season for the former Illinois offensive coordinator. The Lobos are 0-6 and Locksley was accused of sexual harrassment by a former football office employee. The allegations were declared "unfounded" by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, according to a separate report.

There was speculation that Locksley would be fired after punching Gerald. The assistant was recently placed on administrative leave and is expected to leave the university.

For now, Locksley is not the first coach fired this season. He made his reputation as a master recruiter and play caller at Maryland and Illinois among other stops. Locksley is one of seven African-American head coaches in Division I-A.

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: September 11, 2009 1:33 am
Edited on: September 11, 2009 7:45 am
 

Clemson 27, Josh Nesbitt 3

You have to admit, it's entertaining.

The ACC might not be able to handle the Colonial Athletic Association but it can sure stage some conference doozies. Monday: Miami and Florida State return to the national stage. Thursday: Clemson and Georgia Tech try to play giveaway.

Tech jumps out to a 24-0 lead, only to fall behind 27-24 in the fourth quarter. Then, bam, Josh "The Arm" Nesbitt strikes again. Actually, Nesbitt didn't strike much of anything including the sides of barns. Nesbitt is the Tech quarterback who will not soon be confused with Dan Fouts. In fact, he represents the biggest weakness in Paul Johnson's option offense. In general, its quarterbacks aren't great throwers.

To be fair, Johnson inherited Nesbitt and is only two classes into his recruiting career at Tech. So what Johnson is left with is a 42 percent career passer. Nesbitt was awful for most of the game. He had one more completion (three, out of 14 attempts) than interceptions (two).

In the end, only one pass mattered. Nesbitt hit Demaryius Thomas with a 39-yard strike in the fourth quarter that set up Scott Blair's game-winning field goal. In other news, blind squirrels sometimes find nuts.

In the second week of the season it was a game that both teams had to win. Virginia Tech remains the ACC favorite. Florida State was impressive on Monday. Georgia Tech goes to suddenly formidable Miami next Thursday. Clemson hosts Boston College, followed by TCU.

Nesbitt did run for 91 yards, which is his strength. You feel sorry for Clemson's Kyle Parker, the more conventional quarterback (261 yards, three touchdowns) who led the comeback. But this isn't about convention.

All is forgiven, ACC, if you keep pumping out conference games like this.
Posted on: June 26, 2009 3:41 pm
Edited on: June 29, 2009 11:00 am
 

Picking the ACC

It has been easy to take shots at the ACC since expansion.

The whole Florida State/Miami axis-of-excellence thing hasn't panned out. But there have been some stories worth reading. Wake Forest competes favorably representing one of the smallest schools in I-A. Everybody is waiting for North Carolina to break out under Butch Davis. Georgia Tech's option game has baffled opponents, at least in Paul Johnson's first season.

Virginia Tech has remained the only constant. The Hokies have won consecutive ACC titles and never seems to drop far off the grid. Frank Beamer could be anywhere. He has chosen to remain in Blacksburg and built an unlikely powerhouse.

The Hokies are prohibitive favorites to make it three in a row.

Atlantic

1. North Carolina State -- Invest in Tom O'Brien. The Wolfpack's coach is as solid commodity as there is on Wall Street these days. Actually better, considering the state of Wall Street. For 10 years, he overachieved at Boston College. Now with more resources he is ready to deliver in Raleigh. When in doubt, I always go with a solid returning quarterback. Russell Wilson might have the most upside of any in the league. He enters the season with 249 passes without an interception, 22 short of Drew Weatherford's ACC record. During an injury-filled season Wilson still threw 17 touchdowns and only one interception. O'Brien will hit it big in his third season coming in with a four-game winning streak to end '08.

UPDATE: Linebacker Nate Irving was injured in a car accident on Sunday (6/28). Irving, when healthy, was one of the best linebackers I saw last season. If he isn't able to go this season, the certainly impacts the Pack's chances.

2. Florida State -- The bandwagon is not full. I'm intrigued why the Seminoles are most people's choice in this division. Bobby Bowden is back to having an established quarterback (Christian Ponder) for the first time in eight seasons. The offensive line is reflecting line coach Rick Trickett's toughness (left tackle Andrew Datko was a freshman All-American). But there aren't the dynamic athletes we're used to seeing. And there always seems to be some drama around the program. People have talked more about the loss of 14 victories in the offseason more than Ponder having some reliable receivers. Try to envision a nine-win season with road trips to BYU, North Carolina, Clemson, Wake and Florida. I can't. FSU could win the division and probably eight games but it will take a step back from '08 when it won nine. 

3. Wake Forest -- The Deacons have won 11, 9 and 8 games the last three seasons. It would be logical to assume the decline is going to continue. Most of the returning players are back on offense, which struggled. The defense loses eight starters. Four players were taken in the first four rounds of the draft. That's amazing but also troubling for this season. Wake will have to get those new defensive starters ready to contribute right away for it to be a factor in the division.
 
4. Clemson
-- The Dabo Swinney era goes into its first full season. A 4-2 finish by the former receivers coach was enough to raise hopes after the end of Tommy Bowden's 9 1/2-year reign. There is always the fear that Clemson is still Clemson. Since 1999, it has never won less than six or more than nine. The Tigers have had the talent to win the ACC each of the last three seasons but they always seem to disappoint. Kevin Steele was a huge get as defensive coordinator coming from Alabama. Tailback C.J. spillers is less than 1,000 yards away from becoming the ACC's career leader in all-purpose yards. Swinney will be reminded at every turn that the last ACC title was in 1991. 

5. Maryland -- We can see the end of the Ralph Friedgen era in College Park. Offensive coordinator James Franklin is the coach in waiting. The Terps should take a major dip after going 8-5. Twelve starters have departed including receiver Darrius Heyward-Bey. Friedgen loves Torrey Smith and redshirt freshman Kevin Dorsey as emerging talents at receiver. Franklin has done a good job shaping senior quarterback Chris Turner. 

6. Boston College -- Gene DeFilippo is my hero. Look, I liked Jeff Jagodzinski but I admire BC's AD for calling the former coach's bluff when Jags interviewed with the Jets. I admire DeFilippo more for replacing Jags with the guy who most deserved it. Frank Spaziani was d-coordinator for 10 years and had earned his shot. There is enough left over from the nation's No. 5 five defense to compete (linebacker Mark Herzlich was ACC defensive player of the year). You wonder, though, if the Eagles will be able to throw when they need to. Junior Codi Boek arrived as a quarterback, then was converted to fullback. He is now is back at quarterback. He is competing with freshman Justin Tuggle.


Coastal

1. Virginia Tech -- Beamer doesn't get enough credit. The Hokies have become the dominant program in a league that was formed showcase Miami and Florida State. In the last five seasons he has won 52 games and three ACC titles, including the last two in a row. Virginia Tech should go to a third consecutive BCS bowl. Quarterback Tyrod Taylor gets the job to himself after injuries and Sean Glennon blocked his way the past two seasons. Taylor's game resembles a certain legend whose name rhymes with "quick." Sophomore tailback Darren Evans rushed for most of his 1,265 yards in the second half of the season.  Coordinator Bud Foster might have his best defense ever. It is quick and mean. If the Hokies get past Alabama in the opener, they could be in the national championship hunt.

2. Georgia Tech -- You've got to love Paul Johnson's, um, confidence. When folks questioned whether his triple option could work in the big time he went out and won nine while beating Georgia in his first season with the Jackets. Things should be better this season Heisman candidate Jonathan Dwyer, the ACC's leading rusher, is complemented nicely by Roddy Jones in the same backfield. The defense finished in the top 25 nationally and held five teams to 20 points or less. The secondary is loaded with the addition of corner Jerrard Tarrant who was suspended for all of '08 fighting a rape accusation. The charges were dropped. The toughest stretch will be three weeks in October when the Jackets play at Mississippi State, at Florida State and Virginia Tech at home.

3. North Carolina -- Davis continues to recruit. The Tar Heels should continue to win. In Davis' second year the Heels jumped from four to eight wins. Often-injured quarterback T.J. Yates lost his two most reliable targets (Hakeem Nicks and Brandon Tate) to the NFL. Fortunately, the defense is loaded. If the Heels can win at Georgia Tech on Sept. 26 don't be surprised if they start 6-0.
 
4. Miami -- I don't care who is responsible. In fact, I don't want to know. The schedule, though, is a joke. Poor Randy Shannon is looking at 0-4 with the toughest first four games in the country -- at Florida State, Georgia Tech, at Virginia Tech and Oklahoma. Shannon lost a quarterback (Robert Mavre) and had to change both coordinators. Mark Whipple came from the NFL to take over the offense. First-year d-coordinator John Lovett came from North Carolina. The defense is stout, but let's be honest. This is Miami and if they don't win big with flair, it will be a disappointment.  The progress of quarterback Jacory Harris will be on one of the major stories in the conference.

5. Virginia -- It has been a weird circle of life in Charlottesville. Al Groh's son Mike became offensive coordinator in 2006 after Ron Prince left to become Kansas State's head coach. Prince is back (as special teams coach) after being fired at K-State. Mike Groh was, um, let go after producing the sixth-worst offense in Division I-A last season. Gregg Brandon has installed a spread offense for quarterback Jameel Sewell. They should be thankful to work together. Brandon landed at Virginia after being fired at Bowling Green. Sewell missed '08 because he was academically ineligible.

6. Duke -- There won't be a more upbeat last-place team in the country. David Cutcliffe squeezed out four victories in his first season as coach. That ties for the most in Krzyzewskiville since 1994. Senior quarterback Thaddeus Lewis gets one last season to work under the guy who tutored Peyton and Eli. Last season's defense held three opponents to less than 10 points for the first time since 1976. Only four starters return including potential All-ACC defensive tackle Vince Oghobaase.

 

Posted on: June 2, 2009 4:24 pm
Edited on: June 2, 2009 4:46 pm
 

FSU's appeal of Bowden's victories ongoing

Bobby Bowden and Florida State still don't know the fate of the 14 victories in question regarding the celebrated academic fraud case.

The process is still ongoing -- and complicated -- judging from a cryptically worded release from Florida State on Tuesday. We were led to believe that a decision from the appeals committee might come down today. Turns out that even some at FSU were surprised that we are essentially still in the middle of the process.

Florida State is appealing the loss of wins in several sports -- including up to 14 in football -- the result of NCAA penalties handed down in March. The NCAA acknowledged Tuesday only that the appeals committee has received its response from the NCAA infractions committee. That starts a clock that now gives Florida State 15 days (until June 17) to file a rebuttal to the response. Then there are 10 days for the NCAA to respond back to FSU.

The school already has requested an in-person hearing with the appeals committee after those two steps are completed. Florida State has said it will make its rebuttal public when it is filed.

It can only be assumed that the infractions committee did not have a favorable response to the appeal.

"If that was the case, (we) probably would have heard something," said a person close to the process.

The school is doggedly fighting the NCAA penalties because of Bowden's legacy. The loss of 14 victories would stain the program and virtually end the neck-and-neck race between Bowden and Penn State's Joe Paterno for the all-time victories record. Paterno is currently No. 1 in Division I-A with 383 wins, one ahead of Bowden.

The information filed Tuesday is not public. Instead it was posted on a "secure NCAA custodial website" to be viewed only by Florida State lawyers, officials, its consultants and NCAA personnel. No one, anywhere, is talking at this point.

FSU retained the services of The Compliance Group in Lenexa, Kan. to guide it through the case. A letter from appeals committee chair Noel Ragsdale to The Compliance Group's Stacey Karpinnski on Tuesday acknowledged the committee's receipt of the infractions committee's response. FSU president T.K. Wetherell and athletic director Randy Spetman are among those copied on the letter.

Ragsdale is listed as a clinical professor of law at USC. Ironically, Karpinski is listed on The Compliance Group website as having a law degree from FSU. Neither could be reached for comment.

According to the NCAA website, the appeals committee's decision is final after the in-person hearing. That decision is reached by majority vote of the committee members attending the meetings. There are currently five members on the committee.

Also according to the website, the committee will "reverse or modify a ruling (by the infractions committee) only if the individual or institution can show one or more of the following grounds:

1. That the ruling was clearly contrary to the evidence;


2. That the individual's or institution's actions did not constitute an infraction of NCAA rules;


3. There was a procedural error and but for the error, the Committee on Infractions would not have made the finding of violation; or


4. The penalty assessed was excessive such that its imposition constitutes an abuse of discretion."

The appeals committee has been more open to overturning penalties in recent to the consternation of certain infractions committee members.

In 2008, former infractions committee chairman Gene Marsh of Alabama said: "If folks really are interested in righting the wrong of winning games, because you won while you were cheating, vacation (of victories) seems to be a logical thing to do."

Earlier this year, Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen told CBSSports.com he agreed with the original FSU penalties.

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: March 21, 2009 10:57 pm
 

What I'll remember about Kansas City...

 ...besides the fish at Bristol during Lent, great arena and surprisingly vociferous fans

 

 Memphis fans chanting "ACC, ACC" at hopelessly outclassed Maryland. Maryland fans (Ok, just a few) firing back, "SAT, SAT."

 Greivis Vasquez not backing down. The Maryland guard called out Memphis, then stood in the lockerroom and said, "No, I don't regret anything. They proved me wrong. That's what sport is about ... There was some trash talking involved, but it's basketball."

 Wondering whether either of the teams that emerged from here will get to the Final Four. No and no.

Oklahoma doesn't have enough around Blake Griffin. The run will end in the Elite Eight. Memphis doesn't have enough offense but if it keeps getting turnovers off its press, watch out. I wouldn't bet against the Tigers especially with super-sub Roburt Sallie coming off the bench.

I wish the NCAA didn't play Final Fours in 70,000-seat stadiums. This would be a perfect place for the end of the dance.

See you in Glendale, Ariz. next week.

 

 

Category: NCAAB
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com