Tag:Orange Bowl
Posted on: October 14, 2009 6:22 pm
 

National notes

Thank you Florida State for releasing the 695-page transcript of the school's hearing with the NCAA earlier this year.

What the school gained in transparency, it lost in embarrassment. In the transcript we found out that one academic advisor said a player had a 60 IQ and was unable to read. Gee, what was he doing at Florida State then?

 Jan. 1 used to be a holy day of obligation. Hook up an IV of beer, spread out the snacks, let the belt out a notch and veg in front of the TV.

Lately, our day of football daze has been denuded of significance. The calendar for Jan. 1, 2011 now shows at least six games. Six! The announcement of the Dallas Classic beginning in 14 months further degrades what used to be the best football day of the year.

Just what the world needs, a No. 7 team from the Big 12 vs. some slug from Conference USA. Jan. 1 used to be special. All the majors played on the same day. Now the Rose, Fiesta, Sugar and Orange are so spread out you need a GPS to locate them all.

In addition to the Rose and Sugar, this year we’ll get the Gator, Capital One and Outback. The roster swells next year because Dallas felt the need to replace the Cotton Bowl game it is losing to the new Cowboys Stadium in Arlington. The new Dallas Classic will be played in the Cotton Bowl.

Can’t wait to see the attendance in the 92,000 stadium which is essentially used twice a year. The other time being for Texas-Oklahoma. Got a birthday or a bar mitzvah coming up, the Cotton Bowl is available.

The Rose Bowl has been the Jan. 1 stalwart. We could always look forward to seeing the parade and the San Gabriel Mountains each New Year’s Day. Nurse that hangover, suck on a Bloody Mary. It was all good. In recent years, even the Rose has been moved around in years it is in the BCS championship rotation.


The game itself has become almost an afterthought with the Big Ten having lost seven Grandaddys in a row.

Sure, it’s a national holiday and advertisers know we’re going to be home to watch, but we want our NYD back. The beer is going flat.


 Expanding on the Ndamukong Suh angle. If the Nebraska defensive tackle is on top of the list, here are the other top five defense players in the country.

2. Eric Berry, S, Tennessee. The SEC defensive player of the year hasn’t backed off. Berry has an incredible 50 tackles and one interception of Tim Tebow.

3.Tyler Sash, S, Iowa. Tied for the national lead in interceptions with five.

4.Brandon Spikes, LB, Florida. The fastest, meanest linebacker around playing for the No. 1 defense. Thirty-two tackles, four tackles for loss and two sacks.

5. Rolando McClain, LB, Alabama. Bama has the No. 2 defense in the country. McClain is the center of it with 42 tackles, 5 ½ for loss, two sacks and two interceptions.

  This week’s Scripps Howard Heisman poll which yours truly votes in.

            (10 voters. First-place votes in parentheses.)
            1. Tim Tebow, QB, Florida. 40 points (8).
            2. Colt McCoy, QB, Texas, 25.
            3. Tony Pike, QB, Cincinnati, 13.
            4 (tie). Jimmy Clausen, QB, Notre Dame;
            Case Keenum, QB, Houston, 12.
           
            Others receiving votes: Nebraska DT Ndamukong, Suh, 7; Miami QB Jacory Harris, 6; Texas WR Jordan Shipley 5 (1); Kansas QB Todd Reesing 5 (1); Alabama RB Mark Ingram 5; Stanford RB Toby Gerhart, 2; Boise State QB Kellen Moore, 2.
 
 
 Weird meeting of the headsets Thursday in South Florida.

Cincinnati’s Brian Kelly fired defensive coordinator Joe Tresey after last season. Tresey was then hired by Bulls’ coach Jim Leavitt. South Florida enters Thursday’s showdown fifth in scoring defense (9.4 points per game) after allowing 20 per game last season.

Advantage Tresey who knows Cincy’s personnel and whose team is at home? Not exactly. Kelly’s new d-coordinator Bob Diaco has the Bearcats at No. 10 in scoring defense (13.8 points).

 Props to Lousiana-Monroe which has its longest conference winning streak (three games) since 1992. The Warhawks have one of the smallest budgets in I-A and are coached by the coach thought to be the lowest paid in the division, Charlie Weatherbie.

 The WAC is at it again. Idaho’s Tre’Shawn Robinson was reprimanded by the conference after throwing a punch against San Jose State. Reprimanded, not suspended. Sound familiar, Boise State?

 We’ll know more next week but Washington looks to be the most improved team in the country at the halfway point. The Huskies are 3-3 heading to Saturday’s game at Arizona State. That’s a net improvement of six games over last season’s 0-12 record. The season reaches its halfway point on Saturday.

Posted on: May 11, 2009 12:19 pm
Edited on: May 11, 2009 12:32 pm
 

We'll miss you Mim

In 1993, I covered the first home game in Colorado Rockies history. Really, it was a chance to drive out to Colorado Springs and see my friend Tim Mimick.

OK, Mim was offering a couch for free so that had something to do with too. That was Mim. He was the funniest guy I ever knew. That will never change. He was smart like that. He didn't like hack comics. He liked guys who made you think, like Bill Hicks.

He was also the smartest guy I ever knew. It was his goal, with his investments, to be able to retire at age 50. In 2003, at 49, Mim told the Colorado Springs Gazette that their paycheck was no longer needed. Somewhere, Warren Buffett blushed. Mim eventually moved back to native Columbus, Neb. to be with his mother who eventually died of cancer.

Mim was diagnosed himself last April. On Sunday, he died. Hug those close to you today and tell them you love them. Squeeze them tight. I never got that chance in the end with my buddy. Because of it, there will always be a small hole of guilt in my heart.
 
There will never be a person like him. Those of us who knew the Mim Dog will always have that laugh gene that he passed on. Can't wait to see you again someday, Tim. Hope the couches are more comfortable up there.

Here is the obit of the great Timothy L. Mimick ...

Tim Mimick, a Scotus Central Catholic High School and University of Nebraska graduate who became sports editor of the Columbus (Neb.) Telegram and later a longtime, award-winning sports writer at The Gazette in Colorado Springs, Colo., died Sunday at Genoa Community Hospital of complications from cancer. He was 55.
   
"I had the greatest respect in the world for Tim," former Air Force Academy football coach Fisher DeBerry told The Denver Post from his home in Isle of Palms, S.C. "He loved doing what he did for a living. To me, he was more than a great sports writer. He was a great friend as well. He was a pleasure to work with. He always looked for the positive in everything he did. I know my players loved being covered by him because they knew Tim had great admiration for them and for the academy.
   
"He will be greatly missed."
   
Mimick graduated from Scotus in 1971 and from Nebraska in 1975. He was a Gazette sports writer from 1979 to 2003 and covered most of the newspaper's major Front Range beats, including the NBA's Denver Nuggets, the football and basketball teams at the University of Colorado, Air Force and Colorado State, and numerous events at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. He retired from journalism after covering the NCAA basketball tournament in 2003 and returned to Columbus, his hometown, to be closer to his family.

    "Tim not only was the best of the best among sports writers, he was the nicest person I've ever met," said Mike Burrows, a 1975 graduate of Columbus High School who worked with Mimick in Colorado Springs and now is with The Post sports department. "He displayed extraordinary courage during the last year of his life. Not once did he complain about being seriously ill. Not once. I'll never forget that, and I'll never forget Tim. Knowing him truly was a blessing."

    Mimick's work for the Colorado Springs newspaper took him to many high-profile events, including the Orange Bowl, Cotton Bowl and Fiesta Bowl, the Final Four of the NCAA basketball tournament and the NFL and NBA playoffs. One of the big thrills of his journalism career in Colorado Springs was covering Air Force's stunning 23-11 upset of Ohio State in the 1990 Liberty Bowl, where a Buckeyes senior safety named Bo Pelini, now Nebraska's football coach, played the last game of his college career.

    "Talent alone didn't make Tim a special sports writer," said DeBerry, the winningest coach in the history of military academy football. "Tim was a special sports writer also because he was a special person. And it showed in his work. Every time Tim walked into my office, I knew my day would be better because of him being there. He was a great man. His family had every reason to be proud of him.

    "Please keep Tim and his family in your prayers," DeBerry said.

 

 

Posted on: December 29, 2008 7:11 pm
 

A quarter century of Florida national champions

Nine national champions in the state of Florida since that magical night in the Orange Bowl almost 25 years ago.

The Tampa Tribune polled 20 journalists to determine which of the nine was best.

 Alabama's Andre Smith besmirched the name of the Outland Trophy by getting suspended for the Sugar Bowl. Supposedly, it has to do with dealings with an agent. I'm always amazed at how these guys can't wait a few days until after the bowl game to get into this kind of stuff.

 

The Outland dinner and ceremony in Omaha early next year is one of the finest of its kind in the country. It's a shame that this kid did something idiotic (allegedly) to soil the good name of the second-oldest individual award in college football.

 Apparently, USC players aren't up on their current events. I'm thinking this video is at least as much about the irrelevance of Joe Biden's political career than about the Trojans not knowing the vice president.

 

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: November 3, 2008 11:23 am
Edited on: November 3, 2008 11:24 am
 

The lastest coach to bite the dust

Tom Amstutz is a good man.

I know because I was able to spend some time with him at the Fiesta Bowl six years ago. His running back William Bratton was being honored there as winner of the Football Writers Association of America's Courage Award. Bratton continued to play despite a sickle cell disorder that left him tremendous pain.

I prefer to remember the Tom Amstutz who won at least nine games in four of his first give seasons at Toledo, not the coach who has won 12 games the past three seasons. Things happen. In its own way, the MAC is a brutally competitive conference. There was a gambling scandal (never implicating Amstutz) a couple of years ago. As recently as 2006, Toledo beat Kansas with many of the same Jayhawks who would play in the Orange Bowl the next season.

Amstutz has found work. He reportedly will be reassigned to the alumni relations department after stepping at the end of the season. That's what a classy university does when it lets go of a coach. This might be nothing more than a soft landing spot for Amstutz before he finds another coaching job. Toledo owes him that much. He is outgoing, known as the coach who constantly wears a whistle around his neck -- even during games.

Toledo will find a good coach too. Its football tradition runs too deep. The MAC is as wide open as a conference as there is. I wonder about Bratton, though, these days. Since he was in school the national trainers' assocation has issued guidelines for players with sickle-cell.

Because apparently Central Florida didn't follow those guidelines, the program is in big trouble as it is being sued by the parents of a player who died last season.

 

 

 

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: August 11, 2008 11:02 am
 

Five things you should know about the WAC

1. Don't expect Fresno State to imitate the baseball team: That would be winning a national championship. Football 
Fresno would settle for a BCS bowl. Again, not likely. Fresno gets orange juice only if it can win at Rutgers and 
UCLA and beat Wisconsin at home. That's for starters. The Bulldogs also have to go to Toledo and Boise State.

They start the season ranked on the fringes of the top 25. It's hard to believe Fresno hasn't won an outright 
conference title since 1989. This is Pat Hill's best team in years and the Bulldogs will be favored to win the WAC. 
But it won't be good enough to get to the Orange Bowl.

2. The team formerly known as Hawaii will drop off your radar: Colt Brennan and all his best receivers are gone. So 
is the coach (June Jones) who made it all happen. Quarterback Tyler Graunke faced academic problems early on. Oh 
yeah, and the Warriors start the season like they ended it -- in the belly of the SEC beast (August 30 at Florida).
 

3. Dead: That's what San Jose State football was before Dick Tomey took over in 2005. Since then the program has won 17 games and gone to a bowl. Three BCS conference transfers will help the Spartans challenge for a second bowl in 
four years. Cal transfer Kyle Reed will be in the fight at quarterback. Former Parade All-American and USC player 
Jeff Schweiger will do the same at defensive end. Corner Koye Francies comes over from Oregon State.

 
4. Vanderbilt is no New Mexico State: If you think the Commodores are having a tough time going to a bowl (its last 
was in 1982), check out the Aggies who haven't been to the postseason since 1960. That's the longest bowl drought in the country. Hal Mumme -- remember him? -- has 16 returning starters including productive quarterback Chase 
Holbrook.


5. The Louisiana Tech coach would have to fire himself: That's theoretically the case in Ruston, La. where coach 
Derek Dooley is also the AD. Vince Dooley's son raised hopes in his first season guiding the Bulldogs to a 5-7 
record. The quarterback situation is especially interesting with Auburn transfer Steve Ensminger and Georgia Tech 
transfer Taylor Bennett battling with holdover Ross Martin.

Posted on: August 7, 2008 8:04 pm
Edited on: August 7, 2008 8:04 pm
 

Five things you should know about the MWC

 

1. LaVell Edwards would be proud. Bronco Mendenhall has BYU humming at the level set by the old coach. Mendenhall has won 22 combined games the past two years. The offense averaged 30 points per game to lead the Mountain West. The defense, Mendenhall's specialty, gave up less than 100 yards rushing per game. The schedule sets up for an Orange Bowl run. The toughest road game is the finale at Utah. The winner might get a BCS berth.

2. Urban Meyer would be proud too. Since Meyer left his replacement Kyle Whittingham has won run three bowls and averaged eight victories a season at Utah. If not BYU, then the Utes could make a BCS run. Whittingham is loaded with 16 returning starters. If the Utes win at transitioning Michigan to start the season watch out.

3. Hot Seat Central. If things don't improve at UNLV and San Diego State quick, Mike Sanford (6-29 for the Rebels) and Chuck Long (7-17 for the Aztecs) are going to be out of a job. The prospects aren't good. San Diego State has to go to Notre Dame, TCU, New Mexico and BYU. UNLV plays Utah, Arizona State and BYU on the road. 


4.The Mtn. is climbing. The folly that once was the conference's own network now seems to be gaining traction. The Mtn. will be getting more exposure on cable systems. Will anyone be watching?
 

5.They're not Horned Frauds. TCU always seems to be hanging around, threatening to break through to a BCS bowl. Three years ago they won at Oklahoma. Two years ago it was Texas Tech. This year Stanford and Oklahoma are on the schedule before the BYU game on Oct. 16.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com