Tag:Penn State
Posted on: November 15, 2011 6:07 pm
Edited on: November 16, 2011 2:12 pm
 

Harvard's Murphy interested in Penn State

Harvard coach Tim Murphy would “definitely” be interested in “looking into” the vacant Penn State job, according to a source close to the situation.

It is not known if Murphy is being considered by Penn State for the job but has been mentioned in reports because of his success at the non-scholarship Ivy League program. The source did not want to be identified because of the sensitivity of the situation and because the coaching search to replace Joe Paterno is in its earliest stages.

“I think he’d definitely be interested in looking into it,” the source said Tuesday. “He’d have to look … at this one. He’s got plenty of years left in him. He’s absolutely interested in exploring it.”

Murphy, 54, has long been admired by his peers. On Saturday, the Crimson won their sixth Ivy League title under Murphy. His name popped up at Michigan before Rich Rodriguez was hired, at Notre Dame before Charlie Weis was hired and at Boston College before Frank Spaziani was hired. Murphy’s name has been connected to at least six major jobs since 2001.

“He’s not a name that’s on top of everybody’s mind, but maybe that’s the whole point,” the source said.

Murphy once told CBSSports.com that he is determined not to repeat his experience at Cincinnati. He took the job at a program hit with NCAA probation in 1989 as the youngest coach, 32, in then Division I-A. He abruptly quit after 1993 to take the Harvard job. The reason was to be near his terminally-ill mother. He never left Harvard.

Murphy is 119-59 at the school. 

Buffalo Bills quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick thought his college coach would be a good fit at Penn State.

"Obviously they’re looking for a guy with a clean record, a guy that cares a lot about academics and the student part of the student-athlete and in that regard I think he’d be a perfect fit ...," Fitzpatrick told CBSSports.com Rapid Reporter Mark Ludwiczak, "He possesses all the qualities that I think they would look for.

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: November 10, 2011 10:48 am
Edited on: November 10, 2011 10:56 am
 

JoePa to end at 409

More than likely, any wins accumulated by Penn State interim coach Tom Bradley will be credited to him according to the NCAA.

That is an issue now that Joe Paterno and his 409 wins have gone to the sidelines. The NCAA typically leaves it up to the school on how to list wins when a coach leaves during a season but historically in firings, resignations and deaths, the succeeding coach gets credit.

 “At some point we’ll reach out to the school just to check to make sure it’s Bradley,” said NCAA statistics director Jim Wright. “The last thing we want to do right now is check with the SID.”

The exception, of course, is vacated wins. Calhoun and Kentucky’s John Calipari made it to this year’s Final Four having vacated wins in the same year (1996) for NCAA improprieties during their watch.

Paterno was fired Wednesday owning the Division I record for wins. He passed Eddie Robinson this season. Bradley, Penn State's longtime defensive coordinator, will lead the Nittany Lions Saturday against Nebraska. Penn State has the possibility of playing five more games this season.  

Posted on: November 8, 2011 3:08 pm
Edited on: November 8, 2011 10:01 pm
 

Stagg family may have issues with Paterno scandal

Amos Alonzo Stagg’s name being attached to the Big Ten football championship trophy may have to be reevaluated if Joe Paterno is found to be “complicit” in the Jerry Sandusky scandal according to Stagg's great grandson.

The hardware for the first Big Ten championship game next month -- the Stagg-Paterno Championship Trophy – has yet to be presented. But Robert Stagg told CBSSports.com on Tuesday that he is concerned about the family’s association if “more disturbing evidence,” is found in the case that has captured national headlines.

“If he [Paterno] has been complicit in this, he’s got to step down,” said Stagg, a 54-year-old father working in sales in Grand Rapids, Mich. “Unfortunately that would be the case.”

Asked specifically if “complicit” meant not going to authorities if Paterno knew a crime had been committed, Stagg said: “If you have knowledge of what’s going on, you have to alert authorities. You can’t leave it up to someone else to alert authorities. You have to. It’s the only thing to do.”

Stagg says he assumes Paterno’s innocence but has followed the situation closely. Sandusky, Paterno’s former defensive coordinator, is charged with multiple accounts molesting young boys. Former graduate assistant and current assistant Mike McQueary reportedly told Paterno in 2002 he witnessed Sandusky having sex with a 10-year-old boy in a Penn State lockerroom shower.

Paterno then told his AD, Tim Curley, who summoned McQueary 1 ½ weeks later. Sandusky was banned from bringing children into the football facility but no authorities were contacted. Paterno has maintained his innocence through his attorney. Curley and Penn State finance officer Gary Schultz have been charged with perjury.

“It was sickening. It’s just horrible,” said a Stagg, a descendant of the great Amos Alonzo Stagg. “We hear of these things from time to time in the paper, be it with the Catholic Church or various individuals. This is just one that when you look at the gentleman’s [Sandusky] involvement and charitable-type endeavors. I just don’t understand it.”

Stagg was not specific about what action the family might take but he said they are monitoring the situation. He added that a contingent of 20 family members will travel to Indianapolis for the first Big Ten championship game on Dec. 3. His father, Amos Alonzo Stagg III, will be honored at the game. Stagg III, 84, is the same age as Paterno.

The original Amos Alonzo Stagg is the legendary coach who won 319 games in 57 years. Amos Alonzo Stagg was a noted innovator in both football and basketball. He coached at the University of Chicago for parts of five decades. The University of Chicago was in the Big Ten a portion of that time.

“There are some [family] roots to the state of Pennsylvania,” Robert Stagg said. “We’ve kind of cheered JoePa along. We’re still hoping he’s cleared on this. If something else comes to light and he kind of let this go leaving someone else to handle, then we may feel very differently …

“We’ll just have to wait and see but if we find that a lot more disturbing evidence comes out I’m sure we will have a lot of discussion with the Big Ten.”

Paterno is in his 45TH year as Penn State head coach. Penn State joined the Big Ten in 1992.

“He’s had a wonderful career and honestly we hope he’s cleared of all this,” Stagg said.

 

 

Posted on: November 7, 2011 9:41 pm
Edited on: November 7, 2011 10:11 pm
 

B10 statement re: Sandusky scandal

It wasn’t much but the Big Ten weighed in on the Jerry Sandusky scandal Monday night.

Through a spokesman, the league said, “Because it’s an ongoing criminal investigation we have no comment.”

That’s significantly less than what NCAA president Mark Emmert said in a statement earlier Monday.

"This is a criminal matter under investigation by law enforcement authorities and I will not comment on details. However, I have read the grand jury report and find the alleged assaults appalling. As a parent and an educator, the notion that anyone would use a position of trust to prey on children is despicable. My thoughts and concern goes out to the alleged victims and their families."

We now have some sort of reaction  from  Penn State chancellor Graham Spanier, Pennsylvania law enforcement authorities, the NCAA and Big Ten. Next stop, the Big Ten conference call on Tuesday. Penn State has said Paterno will be on for his regularly-scheduled time slot at 1:20 pm ET. That is preceded by his weekly press conference for local media at 12:30 ET at Beaver Stadium.

As a pre-emptive strike, Penn State sent out a notice Monday saying that Paterno would only answer questions about the Penn State game.

Good luck with that. 

Posted on: November 3, 2011 10:44 pm
 

Son of Weekend Watch List

Son of WWL is the petulant offspring of Weekend Watch List. This week it weighs in on the LSU-Alabama rematch.

 


Before the teams even kick it off Saturday LSU-Alabama II has filled minds, cyberspace and column inches.

That’s the world we live in. If Tigers-Tide is good, a rematch in the BCS championship game could be better – depending. Depending on a very narrow set of circumstances.

First, ask yourself. Do you even want to see the Game of the (11-year-old) Century again, two months later? Is that even fair? Here’s my take on how it could happen:

--LSU has to lose Saturday’s game. Alabama is favored and playing at home. The pollsters probably wouldn’t give the benefit of the doubt to the Crimson Tide in this scenario if they lose. It doesn’t matter that LSU is No. 1. Alabama is No. 2 and perceived to be the better team playing at home before 101,821 fans and Bear Bryant growling in the background. Literally.

--LSU has to play well and lose a close game, preferably at the gun and preferably by a 55-yard field goal or something like that. That would resurrect the oldest line in show business: Always leave them wanting more.

--LSU has to win the rest of its games which at this point include Western Kentucky, a trip to Ole Miss and at home against Arkansas. It would help, a lot, if LSU blew out the Hogs. That would be the lasting impression the Tigers would leave in the minds of the voters who would still have to wade through two more Saturdays of football. (Arkansas-LSU is on Friday, Nov. 25).

It was a different set of circumstances but don’t forget LSU lost to Arkansas in 2007 and still went to the BCS title game with two losses. That’s one indication of how powerful an SEC team is in the BCS standings.

--Stanford and Oklahoma State have to lose. At least. The feeling is that LSU would at least have a chance to pass an undefeated Boise State in the BCS. While that’s no certainty, the SEC has gotten the benefit of the doubt before (see above).

“I’m a believer,” Steve Spurrier said, “that if a rematch does occur, the formula we have in place is to get the best two teams in the game.”

Spurrier should know a little bit about the subject. Florida beat Florida in the Sugar Bowl rematch to win the 1996 national championship.


Why it won’t happen

 

--The loser will have had its chance … No one wants to see the game again … Give someone else a chance.

All those are valid arguments and have already manifested themselves five years ago. Michigan lost the last regular-season 1-2 game at Ohio State 42-39 in 2006. On the last day of the season (two weeks later) the Wolverines – No. 3 in the BCS at the time -- were edged out by SEC champ Florida after No. 2 USC was upset by UCLA. Michigan actually gained in the polls and computers, but enough losing out to Florida by .0134 of a point.

--SEC voter fatigue. WWL has no evidence that this exists but after five consecutive national championships who is to say that – if it’s close – human nature won’t take over? In other words, why not give someone else a chance?

--The loser won’t play on the last day of the season (Dec. 3) when a lot of statements can be made. If Alabama wins big in the SEC title game, that will be another reason not to elevate LSU to No. 2. Boise State could complete an undefeated season with what figures to be a complete obliteration of New Mexico.

--The loser better not fall too far. In the 13-year history of the BCS no team that finished out of the top two in the final regular-season polls played for the national championship. Nebraska played for the title in was fourth in 2001 in the AP and coaches poll. Oregon finished but was relegated to the Fiesta Bowl.

 

 

Something to chew on, and spit out: What’s wrong with this world when Barry Switzer gets a statue at Oklahoma 22 years after leaving the school and Nick Saban got one at Alabama after his fourth? … Where have you gone Mike Leach? Last week against Iowa State, Texas Tech failed to throw a touchdown pass for the first time in five years … Unbelievable: Iowa and UCLA still control their own fate in their conferences. Iowa, 5-3, can still win the Legends Division despite a horrific loss last week to Minnesota. The Bruins, 4-4, are in the thick of things in the Pac-12 South. They host division leader Arizona State this week … Penn State’s Silas Redd led the nation in rushing in October with 703 yards … Louisville travels to West Virginia looking for its first three-game Big East winning streak in five years … Unless a meteor hits, Boise’s Kellen Moore should set the record for career wins by a quarterback. Moore is 45-2 as a starter going into the UNLV game.

Posted on: October 30, 2011 1:40 pm
Edited on: October 30, 2011 6:10 pm
 

Thoughts On A Football Saturday: West Virginia

This is on Don Nehlen. Major Harris too. Don’t forget Bobby Bowden. Rich Rodriguez gets credit. Even Bill Stewart.

West Virginia joined Big 12 on Friday (beginning in 2012) because of all those folks. Nehlen, the gritty, veteran coach who put the school on the map. Major Harris, the dual threat sensation before there were dual threat sensations leading the Mountaineers to the brink of a national championship. Rich Rod, the homeboy, and his basketball-on-grass offense. And all Coach Stew did was beat Oklahoma and average nine wins a year.

You can thank Gordon Gee too. Gee was West Virginia’s president during a key time (1981-85) in the school’s history. If not for the school’s admission into the old College Football Association, it might not be here today. West Virginia was among a group of about 15 independents in that initial CFA group of 63 schools.

The CFA gained power out of the Supreme Court’s de-regulation of college football in 1984. It was the television negotiating arm for those top 63 football-playing schools.

“They [West Virginia] met all the criteria,” said former CFA executive director Chuck Neinas. “They routinely get 60,000, their stadium size, strength of schedule, certain academic commitments.”

The qualifications for the old CFA have faded into history. But they are essentially why West Virginia is in a BCS league going forward and the Big East is in trouble. West Virginia has been selected to move on as a big-time football program.

That, and cold, hard numbers. You want to know why West Virginia is in the Big 12 and Louisville isn’t? 500,000 homes. That’s the difference in the half-rating point for television that separates the two schools.     

It comes down to West Virginia’s average 2.6 television rating over the past five years as opposed to 2.1 for Louisville. That half-rating point equals half a million television homes. That’s according to an industry source who had the numbers in front of him for all 120 FBS schools.

The FBS average rating is 2.2 In other words, Louisville is an average TV draw. West Virginia is an above average draw.

Big 12 inventory becomes more valuable because of  West Virginia-Texas and West Virginia-Oklahoma Louisville doesn’t move the needle as much. According the industry source, that 2.1 Louisville rating was boosted significantly by a pair of two five-year-old results – games in 2006 against West Virginia and Rutgers.

Neinas, currently interim Big 12 commissioner, was CFA executive director for the 20 years of existence. It disbanded in 1997. The Mountaineers move to the Big 12 can be traced back to Neinas’ time when he guided college football through a treacherous period. West Virginia made the cut Friday because of all those things – Nehlen’s leadership, that national championship run, ratings points. But it goes back to West Virginia being leading Eastern independent when the CFA was formed.

The CFA was a precursor the current BCS (membership: 66).

So West Virginia has its nose under the tent and the Big East moves on with uncertainty. Even if it does reconstitute itself and expand to 12 teams, there is no guarantee the Big East will retain its BCS status. That issue will at least be discussed when the BCS holds its next scheduled meeting Nov. 14 in San Francisco.

For 2012 at least, the Big 12 is a 10-team conference but don’t hold your breath.

“The only thing constant in this world is change,” Neinas said. “Right now we’ve got our house in order. We’re looking forward to a very aggressive conference.”

 

National notage …

 

A closer look at how Wisconsin has blown its last two games to Michigan State and Ohio State:

In the final eight minutes of both those games the teams’ combined score has been even, 21-21. In those fourth quarters, Wisconsin’s pass defense allowed 10 completions on 17 attempts for 155 yards. Take away the two game-winning plays – Michigan State at the gun and Ohio State with 20 seconds left – and the opposition completed only eight of 15 in that span for 74 yards, 4.93 yards per attempt.

But you can’t leave out those two plays. Keith Nichol caught the winner for Michigan State from 44 yards out. Ohio State’s Devin Smith caught that 40-yard touchdown from Braxton Miller with 20 seconds left.

Essentially, Wisconsin hasn’t responded when playing tougher competition. It won its first six games by at least 31 points. Two plays have killed the Badgers. They will likely be the difference in a BCS bowl (Rose?) and perhaps a Big Ten title.

 


Case Keenum has to be the season’s most valuable player to this point.

Houston is in the running for a Big East berth (maybe) and BCS bowl (barely) primarily because of its quarterback’s right arm. The nation’s leading passer has the Cougars ranked and on the periphery of BCS contention. The memory may have faded by now but Houston beat Rice 73-34 Thursday with Keenum throwing nine touchdown passes.  Someday soon he will be the all-time leader in passing yardage.

Yes, a sixth year of eligibility has helped but look at what it has wrought: In conference realignment where your worth can be judged by what you did yesterday, the Cougars are a hot commodity – at least to the Big East. Houston could be included in a batch of teams that would stretch from BYU to Texas and back East just to keep the conference viable.

Basically, Keenum is all Houston has. That’s no disgrace considering what’s at stake. While the defense is improved over last season (from 103<sup>rd</sup> to 86<sup>th</sup>), the Cougars have won games this season allowing 34 (twice) and 42 points. It all comes back to Keenum, already the NCAA’s career total offense leader, having thrown a nation-leading 32 touchdowns.

Without him, Houston is a commuter school in media market where it is the fourth or fifth option. With him, Houston may someday be able to thank Keenum for a berth in a BCS bowl.

That brings us to this week’s top Heisman contenders ...

1. Keenum – 139 career touchdown passes. 
2. Kellen Moore, Boise State – forget his measurables. Should end up in a pro camp somewhere.
3. Andrew Luck, Stanford – Completion percentage, touchdown-to-interception and passer rating all up over last season.
4. Trent Richardson, Alabama – We’ll know more after Saturday.
5. Russell Wilson, Wisconsin – Don’t blame the nation’s most efficient passer for the Ohio State loss.

 


While we’re speculating on coaching turnover, let’s not forget North Carolina State’s Tom O’Brien.

 

After being shut out by Florida State, 34-0, the Wolfpack is 4-4 having beaten only one BCS conference program this season (Virginia). N.C. State was shut out on the road an ACC game for the first time since 1990, not to mention Wilson’s decision to let Russell Wilson become a free agent.

O’Brien is 29-29 in his fifth season, having never finished better than a tie for second in the ACC Atlantic Division.

 

 
This from the Boulder Daily CameraIt seems like it’s already time to question why Colorado was included in the Pac-12’s expansion plans.

So why was CU No. 1 on Larry Scott's expansion list?

"CU just checked all the boxes for us," the forward-thinking Pac-12 commissioner said. "CU was a fit in terms of academic compatibility, being a good geographic fit and sharing a similar philosophy and culture in terms of the role of athletics within the broader mission. And Denver is a very important market."

Colorado dropped to 1-8, 0-6 in the Pac-12 South after a 48-14 loss at Arizona State. Pac-12 newbies CU and Utah are a combined 5-12 overall, 1-10 in the league.

 


Penn State may be the worst 8-1 team you ever saw, but it has a plucky defense and, more importantly, an inside track to the Big Ten title game.

After beating Illinois Saturday, the Nittany Lions have a 2 ½-game lead over Wisconsin, Purdue and Ohio State in the Leaders Division with three games to go. Hold onto your Coke bottle glasses. Those final three games are at home against Nebraska, at Ohio State and at Wisconsin. If JoePa somehow grabs another Big Ten title at age 84 he will have earned it.

 

Posted on: September 16, 2011 9:59 am
Edited on: September 16, 2011 10:02 am
 

Son of Weekend Watch List

Team/coach/player/name of the week: Iowa State/Paul Rhoads/Steele Jantz. In his three seasons the Cyclones' coach Rhoads has picked off Nebraska, Texas and, last week, Iowa in overtime.

The plucky Cyclones are guided by Jantz whose All-American name is only slightly less noticeable than his quarterback talents. Jantz went to high school in California, played scout team for a season at Hawaii, then went to City College of San Francisco before winning the job at Iowa State.

As for the name, Steele's grandmother started the tradition that carried over with his father (Fox), a brother (Wolf) and an uncle (Truk).

Rhoads has become the toast of Ames as Iowa State goes to Connecticut Friday night with a chance to go 3-0 for the first time since 2005. The former Missouri Western defensive back grew up a few minutes from Jack Trice Stadium. When Iowa State called him at Auburn following the end of the 2008 season, Rhoads would have crawled to Ames.

With conference realignment swirling, he may be single-handedly holding the program at the BCS level.


The road to Atlanta for the SEC title game goes through Nashville: Or another way to identify surprising 2-0 teams.

Vanderbilt: The administration whiffed on Gus Malzahn. James Franklin has brought a steadying hand. A 3-0 start is doable with the SEC opener at home against Ole Miss.
Kansas: A shootout win over MAC power Northern Illinois sets up Jayhawks for a trip to Georgia Tech. Two of the top passing teams in the country.
Northwestern: Dan Persa's injured Achilles could have wrecked the season. Instead the Wildcats have rallied around backup Kain Colter heading into Army.
Illinois: One of the more entertaining games of September Saturday night in Champaign vs. Arizona State.
Colorado State: For the first time since 1941 the Rams plays Colorado with a record of 2-0. For the first time since 1939, the Buffs come into this game 0-2 or worse.
Eastern Michigan: The Eagles first 2-0 start since 1986 gets a test -- a big one -- at Michigan. At least Eastern won't have to travel far from Ypsilanti to get whipped.
Washington State: Lose starting quarterback? No problem, Cougs lead the country in scoring offense.
Florida International: After beating Louisville, Mario Christobal is the nation's new "it" coach.


Scorching SEC: Now the Strength Everywhere even leads the country in scoring offense averaging 39.12 points per team. Two of the top four scoring teams include Arkansas (51.5 points) and South Carolina (50.5). The Big 12 is second at 36.66 points per team.

Best wishes: Minnesota's Jerry Kill is expected to coach Saturday against Miami (Ohio) after suffering seizures last week during the New Mexico State game. Kill has a history of seizures, one of which led to the discovery of his kidney cancer in 2005


More Bobby Bowden on Jimbo Fisher and Florida State: "Jimbo is an excellent football coach. A lot of people forget I was the one that hired him. I've known him since he was a child. He played for my son Terry in college. Terry told me 20 years ago this kid is going to be a great coach.

"I do not feel like Oklahoma's players they're superior to Florida State's. They might be more mature.
"We've been out of that [national picture] for the last 10 years. During the '90s we were up there every year. During the 2000s, we'd gone 10 wins every year for 14 years. Then we fell to eight, went to nine, went to 10. I said, 'Oh boy, we're back.' But instead we went kind of down."


Quote of the week: Tennessee's Derek Dooley describing what it means to go into SEC play (this week against Florida). "How many scars do you have?"


Meaningless stat: Wisconsin and Georgia Tech are first and third nationally in passing efficiency this week. Russell Wilson you can kind of understand making a difference for the ground-based Badgers. But Tech starter Tevin Washington has passed only 21 times in two games. (The Jackets have thrown 26 passes overall.)

Two traditional rushing powerhouses, Georgia Tech finished first and Wisconsin was 12th in that category in 2010.


Signal-stallers: Going into Week 3 Miami, Texas, Penn State and Notre Dame all have quarterback issues. Those schools have produced a total of four Heisman-winning quarterbacks.


Noting: Georgia Tech (hosting Kansas) has five plays of at least 70 yards. No other conference has produced that many ... USC (vs. Syracuse) has outscored its opponent in the fourth quarter only twice in the last 11 games ... Didn't you used to be the Holy War? Utah and BYU meet early this year due to the Cougars' move to independence and the Utes migration to the Pac-12. Something has been lost in this rivalry with no conference implications ... Jimbo Fisher claims that Doak Campbell Stadium has the most bricks of any building in North America. Will Oklahoma be another brick in the wall?


Heisman picks going into Week 3: 1. T.Y. Hilton, FIU: 2. Denard Robinson, Michigan; 3. Robert Griffin, Baylor; 4. Kellen Moore, Boise State; 5. Tyrann Mathieu, LSU.
Posted on: August 10, 2011 7:04 pm
Edited on: August 10, 2011 7:10 pm
 

NCAA CEOs promise sweeping change. No, really

A grizzled reporting comrade, tired of the NCAA process, once said: "Just tell me when they actually do something."

He, like most of us, had grown weary of the NCAA's tough talk, but lack of action. Every new problem was met with some sort of meeting, retreat or summit. Change was slower than Yadier Molina to first base.

That sort of changed on Wednesday. Sort of, because presidents invited to the NCAA's celebrated retreat emerged Wednesday with talk of sweeping change. It was specific, it was bold, it challenged.

It might just happen.

"Some of these things," Penn State president Graham Spanier said, "our coaches and boosters may not like."

"It's time," Cal-Riverside chancellor Tim White said, "for some tough love."

Tough love? When did college athletics start to resemble a bunch of 14-year olds being sent to Rikers Island to see the inside of a jail?

It's the new NCAA, folks. They're wearing the same old suits, but they're also carrying shivs. Figuratively. There are further signs that these guys mean business. If the CEOs accomplish half of what they talked about Wednesday in an afternoon presser, then amateur athletics, not just college athletics, will have changed significantly.

The presidents potentially did more in the last two days than their predecessors did in the last 60 years.

They promised to streamline the NCAA Manual, a monumental undertaking. Their intent: To concentrate more on catching the intentional rule breakers, not necessarily the coaches who make too many phone calls.

"We're going to de-emphasize the rules nobody cares about," Spanier said.

I'm pretty sure the words "sentencing guidelines" have never been mentioned in the enforcement process. That was, before Wednesday. That's why penalties were so maddeningly inconsistent. Now there may be some sense to them.

There was serious talk about a hard 930 Academic Progress Rate. If not, schools don't get into the NCAA tournament. (Note: UConn, already hit with scholarship reductions because of a low APR, would not have been eligible for the 2010 tournament based on the 930 baseline.)

It looks like players are finally going to be paid. It will be a modest amount and the NCAA will bend over backwards to make it look like it's not pay for play, but let's be honest. It is. It's also fair.

So is the idea of multiple-year scholarships. No longer will schollies be renewable year-to-year at the whim of the coach. Kids deserve more security than that. College shouldn't be an annual tryout for a scholarship, it should be about education.

It would be boastful to suggest our July series on reform planted some small seeds in this debate, ah, but what the hell. Let's just say it did. It's a new day in the NCAA and its president Mark Emmert looks like Patrick Swayze in "Road House". Emmert/Patrick has entered the bar, the band has stopped playing, now he needs to clean house.

There is a very big caveat that comes with it. All, or most, of this tough talk has to be backed up. Emmert and The Presidents (hey, not a bad band name) are talking months instead of years in terms of implementing change.

They're on record now. Their reps are at stake. If this doesn't work, it's time to blow up the model and start over. That's what makes me think these sweeping changes are coming. The NCAA live streamed the retreat presser. It interviewed participants. We know who these people are. Where they work. They're frauds if they don't follow through.

Wonder what Walter Byers is thinking about this. The NCAA's first executive director (for parts of four decades) ruled the association with an iron fist. He controlled television appearances, he oversaw the enforcement department like a small-town sheriff dealing out penalties with impunity. It was under him that the perception began: The NCAA protected the rich and punished the poor.

In the last two days Mark Emmert has proved there is a new sheriff in town. One who looks like he's ready to clean house. Just don't ask Emmert/Swayze if he shaves his chest.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com