Tag:NCAA
Posted on: August 5, 2011 12:39 pm
Edited on: August 5, 2011 12:42 pm
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Feedback: 8/5

A week to go until Ohio State's infractions committee hearing. Good see the Bucks' level-headed fans have accepted reality.

This week's feedback feed bag. Write on ...



From: blueriver

The worst thing about being a running back in the SEC...u have to take a pay cut when you go the NFL.


You're My Boy Blue:


So what you're saying is Mark Ingram needs to tell Trent Richardson to start saving his money?



From:
GrouchoDuck

Good series, one of the problems is the painfully slow investigation process.

What is the NCAA going to know about Cam Newton next year that they didn't know last year? It took four years to rule against Reggie Bush, his parents were openly living in a house provided by a booster. The NCAA needs to start by making the process simpler and quicker. They should have already ruled for or against Oregon. The way they process information allows for too much posturing and media manipulation, by all sides involved.


Somebody Step On A Duck?:

Your last sentence is the most profound.

The NCAA has shortened the length of investigations. I was at The (Mock) Enforcement Experience in May at the NCAA. They made it known that the length of the average case has dropped from more than four years to 10 months.

Good on them. While USC gets a lot more attention, the process has become more streamlined. Ohio State has gone from the Buckeye Five to Indianapolis in less than eight months. North Carolina is about to be hammered in a relatively short amount of time.

What the NCAA has never gotten is public perception. Maybe it doesn't know. Maybe it doesn't care. But because the process is so secretive, it invites speculation. That's not going to change if a case lasts five months or five years.

I think a lot of the mystery would be cleared up if the infractions committee hearings were made public. I'm told that's a non-starter because it would cause witnesses to clam up. The NCAA can compel only players, coaches and administrators. Consider that Jim Tressel is coming to Indianapolis next week out of the goodness of his heart. That, and maybe he wants to work again.

So how does making the hearings public change the NCAA's ability that much to gather information? Investigators can use only on-the-record information to support an allegation. No anonymous sources. Making that public at least would peel back a layer of secrecy and make the process more credible.



From: Fergus

Dennis, I liked the article on the NCAA cheating. I live in the United Kingdom and am involved with football, not soccer, over here. In my experience the only real cheats in the game are the coaches, so the easy solution to the problem is fire the coaches - ALL of them, then ban them for a period of five years afterwards.

Fergie:

And I thought I was a radical.



From: Jeff

You are the Nancy Grace of CFB. Sorry, Nancy Grace. Your intent to start the cleanup in Columbus is misguided. It's like treating the symptom and not the disease. The NCAA should take Michael Jackson's advice and start with the man in the mirror as they are the disease. Ohio State, USC, Oregon, Cam Newton's dad are merely the symptoms.


Headline Newshound:


There is no comparison between us. I'm more handsome than Mr. Grace.


From:
Mitch

Awesome article about Coach Leach, Mr. Dodd. I haven't always agreed with your opinions, but I agree that Leach was railroaded in Lubbock. I hope he ends up coaching again somewhere. College football players and fans miss him.


Pirate Fan:

Unfortunately, Leach won't be able to bring his special brand of swashbuckling back to the field until his lawsuits are cleared up. I'm beginning to think the legal battle will stretch into 2012 and keep him out of coaching until at least 2013.



From:
TrojanFan

I disagree with the use of the words "cheaters" and "cheating" in reference to NCAA off-the-field of play code of conduct violations.

You cheat to win. Accepting money or gifts or meals does not help you win an athletic contest, but it is a violation of the code of conduct. Let's call a spade a spade. The emotional buzz words "cheat" and "cheaters" distort the issue. The problem is third parties, aka sports agents involvement and fair compensation for football players who make millions for the school and NCAA. That is the issue that needs to be addressed , not the fact that cheaters appear to be running rampant.


Trojan Man:

We're arguing semantics. Let's change the word "cheat" to "wrongdoing". I don't care. While those Ohio State players may not have been cheating in the truest sense of the word, they were getting extra benefits that the normal student and the overwhelming majority of their teammates don't get.

It also rendered them retroactively ineligible (just like Reggie Bush). Both USC (by the NCAA) and Ohio State (on their own) vacated wins from the effected seasons. It is assumed that most schools' players don't combine to take five figures in extra benefits (Ohio State) or six figures in houses, trips and cash (Bush).

Both cases involve third parties. Agents with Reggie Bush and a tattoo parlor owner at Ohio State. I think you've made a good case, it just needs to be categorized. There is cheating, wrongdoing and negligence. That about sums up every case.



From: Bama Fan

Hi, Dennis. Nice article about programs and the need to cheat if you want to win. To me, it's kind of like the sport of cycling and the need for the best riders to use performance-enhancing drugs.

You are a great rider and competitor and some guy, heck a lot of guys, who shouldn't even be close to seeing your backside is flying past you up a mountain. You have two choices...Accept it and be an anonymous rider in the pack or get your own performance enhancement drugs!

If you are a competitor, you will, in all likelihood, choose the latter. I grew up an Alabama fan in the 70's and the past 15 years, minus 2008-2011, have been a real trial for me. Not just because of the lack of sustained success on the field. But mainly because of the compliance issues of the program and the mark it has left on the reputation of the university. But I honestly believe that the administration and athletics department at the University of Alabama are now really trying to run a clean program.

The (recent) report of the 36 secondary violations is encouraging to me, actually. It shows the compliance department is doing their job. I think I would be more worried, if they weren't reporting these types of violations. You gotta admit some of this stuff is pretty minor.


Bammer:

It is minor, but it has to be reported. Those secondary violations are just that -- secondary. Basically, no one cares except taunting Auburn fans.

But schools are encouraged to report everything. If not, the NCAA gets suspicious. Everything includes every minor infraction, which usually don't amount to much. What hurts Alabama is that the athletic department has been slapped with four cases involving major violations in the last 14 years (three in football).

Combine that with hyper fans and a little thing like 36 secondaries becomes a big deal. Alabama and the SEC have a long history of wrongdoing. I agree that I think the school is being more vigilant. I also know that the next scandal could be right around the corner. Climbing that mountain almost demands it.



From:
Dave

Does the Ereck Plancher trial place George O'Liar in hotter water than his performance would otherwise indicate at UCF?


Dave:

The answer is easy. George O'Leary has won two of the last four Conference USA titles and taken the Knights to four bowls in the last six years.



From:
Vicki

Dennis, It sounds like the real story is the fact that Danny Sheridan claims to have a source for 25 years at the NCAA that leaks. REALLY? Wouldn't hurt to look into that...


Reading Between the Li(n)es:

That's one of the first things I thought of. I'm sure Mark Emmert would like to know too. It appears there is at least one mole inside the NCAA enforcement division.



From: Tim

Hey where is the APOLOGY for all the crap about The Ohio State University? I was expecting it yesterday or today.


Get Bucked:

What, did I miss a violation somewhere?



From: Mark

You need the season to begin...games to analyze. You are a loudmouth fool.


Marked Man:

One that you obviously read. Let the games begin. Please.
Posted on: August 5, 2011 12:39 pm
Edited on: August 5, 2011 12:42 pm
 

Feedback: 8/5

A week to go until Ohio State's infractions committee hearing. Good see the Bucks' level-headed fans have accepted reality.

This week's feedback feed bag. Write on ...



From: blueriver

The worst thing about being a running back in the SEC...u have to take a pay cut when you go the NFL.


You're My Boy Blue:


So what you're saying is Mark Ingram needs to tell Trent Richardson to start saving his money?



From:
GrouchoDuck

Good series, one of the problems is the painfully slow investigation process.

What is the NCAA going to know about Cam Newton next year that they didn't know last year? It took four years to rule against Reggie Bush, his parents were openly living in a house provided by a booster. The NCAA needs to start by making the process simpler and quicker. They should have already ruled for or against Oregon. The way they process information allows for too much posturing and media manipulation, by all sides involved.


Somebody Step On A Duck?:

Your last sentence is the most profound.

The NCAA has shortened the length of investigations. I was at The (Mock) Enforcement Experience in May at the NCAA. They made it known that the length of the average case has dropped from more than four years to 10 months.

Good on them. While USC gets a lot more attention, the process has become more streamlined. Ohio State has gone from the Buckeye Five to Indianapolis in less than eight months. North Carolina is about to be hammered in a relatively short amount of time.

What the NCAA has never gotten is public perception. Maybe it doesn't know. Maybe it doesn't care. But because the process is so secretive, it invites speculation. That's not going to change if a case lasts five months or five years.

I think a lot of the mystery would be cleared up if the infractions committee hearings were made public. I'm told that's a non-starter because it would cause witnesses to clam up. The NCAA can compel only players, coaches and administrators. Consider that Jim Tressel is coming to Indianapolis next week out of the goodness of his heart. That, and maybe he wants to work again.

So how does making the hearings public change the NCAA's ability that much to gather information? Investigators can use only on-the-record information to support an allegation. No anonymous sources. Making that public at least would peel back a layer of secrecy and make the process more credible.



From: Fergus

Dennis, I liked the article on the NCAA cheating. I live in the United Kingdom and am involved with football, not soccer, over here. In my experience the only real cheats in the game are the coaches, so the easy solution to the problem is fire the coaches - ALL of them, then ban them for a period of five years afterwards.

Fergie:

And I thought I was a radical.



From: Jeff

You are the Nancy Grace of CFB. Sorry, Nancy Grace. Your intent to start the cleanup in Columbus is misguided. It's like treating the symptom and not the disease. The NCAA should take Michael Jackson's advice and start with the man in the mirror as they are the disease. Ohio State, USC, Oregon, Cam Newton's dad are merely the symptoms.


Headline Newshound:


There is no comparison between us. I'm more handsome than Mr. Grace.


From:
Mitch

Awesome article about Coach Leach, Mr. Dodd. I haven't always agreed with your opinions, but I agree that Leach was railroaded in Lubbock. I hope he ends up coaching again somewhere. College football players and fans miss him.


Pirate Fan:

Unfortunately, Leach won't be able to bring his special brand of swashbuckling back to the field until his lawsuits are cleared up. I'm beginning to think the legal battle will stretch into 2012 and keep him out of coaching until at least 2013.



From:
TrojanFan

I disagree with the use of the words "cheaters" and "cheating" in reference to NCAA off-the-field of play code of conduct violations.

You cheat to win. Accepting money or gifts or meals does not help you win an athletic contest, but it is a violation of the code of conduct. Let's call a spade a spade. The emotional buzz words "cheat" and "cheaters" distort the issue. The problem is third parties, aka sports agents involvement and fair compensation for football players who make millions for the school and NCAA. That is the issue that needs to be addressed , not the fact that cheaters appear to be running rampant.


Trojan Man:

We're arguing semantics. Let's change the word "cheat" to "wrongdoing". I don't care. While those Ohio State players may not have been cheating in the truest sense of the word, they were getting extra benefits that the normal student and the overwhelming majority of their teammates don't get.

It also rendered them retroactively ineligible (just like Reggie Bush). Both USC (by the NCAA) and Ohio State (on their own) vacated wins from the effected seasons. It is assumed that most schools' players don't combine to take five figures in extra benefits (Ohio State) or six figures in houses, trips and cash (Bush).

Both cases involve third parties. Agents with Reggie Bush and a tattoo parlor owner at Ohio State. I think you've made a good case, it just needs to be categorized. There is cheating, wrongdoing and negligence. That about sums up every case.



From: Bama Fan

Hi, Dennis. Nice article about programs and the need to cheat if you want to win. To me, it's kind of like the sport of cycling and the need for the best riders to use performance-enhancing drugs.

You are a great rider and competitor and some guy, heck a lot of guys, who shouldn't even be close to seeing your backside is flying past you up a mountain. You have two choices...Accept it and be an anonymous rider in the pack or get your own performance enhancement drugs!

If you are a competitor, you will, in all likelihood, choose the latter. I grew up an Alabama fan in the 70's and the past 15 years, minus 2008-2011, have been a real trial for me. Not just because of the lack of sustained success on the field. But mainly because of the compliance issues of the program and the mark it has left on the reputation of the university. But I honestly believe that the administration and athletics department at the University of Alabama are now really trying to run a clean program.

The (recent) report of the 36 secondary violations is encouraging to me, actually. It shows the compliance department is doing their job. I think I would be more worried, if they weren't reporting these types of violations. You gotta admit some of this stuff is pretty minor.


Bammer:

It is minor, but it has to be reported. Those secondary violations are just that -- secondary. Basically, no one cares except taunting Auburn fans.

But schools are encouraged to report everything. If not, the NCAA gets suspicious. Everything includes every minor infraction, which usually don't amount to much. What hurts Alabama is that the athletic department has been slapped with four cases involving major violations in the last 14 years (three in football).

Combine that with hyper fans and a little thing like 36 secondaries becomes a big deal. Alabama and the SEC have a long history of wrongdoing. I agree that I think the school is being more vigilant. I also know that the next scandal could be right around the corner. Climbing that mountain almost demands it.



From:
Dave

Does the Ereck Plancher trial place George O'Liar in hotter water than his performance would otherwise indicate at UCF?


Dave:

The answer is easy. George O'Leary has won two of the last four Conference USA titles and taken the Knights to four bowls in the last six years.



From:
Vicki

Dennis, It sounds like the real story is the fact that Danny Sheridan claims to have a source for 25 years at the NCAA that leaks. REALLY? Wouldn't hurt to look into that...


Reading Between the Li(n)es:

That's one of the first things I thought of. I'm sure Mark Emmert would like to know too. It appears there is at least one mole inside the NCAA enforcement division.



From: Tim

Hey where is the APOLOGY for all the crap about The Ohio State University? I was expecting it yesterday or today.


Get Bucked:

What, did I miss a violation somewhere?



From: Mark

You need the season to begin...games to analyze. You are a loudmouth fool.


Marked Man:

One that you obviously read. Let the games begin. Please.
Posted on: July 31, 2011 6:53 pm
Edited on: August 1, 2011 7:49 am
 

Texas A&M goes to NCAA on Longhorn Network

Texas A&M is urging the NCAA to use a 17-year-old rules interpretation that it believes would keep the Longhorn Network from airing high school games.

CBSSports.com obtained documents that show A&M wants TLN classified as an "institutional publication", per bylaw 11.2.3.4, which would make it an "athletics representative of the institution." The 1994 interpretation dealt most mostly with what was, at the time, an explosion among specialty print publications. Several newsletters, magazines and weeklies sprung up in the 1990s that covered individual schools' sports. Several of those publications reported recruiting news in varying degrees as part of their coverage.

They were, in essence, what could interpreted as print versions of what the TLN is attempting to become in 2011. A&M is asking that the NCAA apply that Nov. 1994 ruling -- regarding those print publications -- to video-based publications.

If not, the school said, "the NCAA, in allowing institutions to create video-based publication agreements without any restriction on content, is opening Pandora's box."

A&M even uses a quote Texas AD DeLoss Dodds to drive home its point about TLN being an "athletics representative."

“This is yet another step leading up to our launch which will offer viewers unprecedented access to our sports programs …” Dodds said in a January press release.

All of it means that Monday's Big 12 AD meetings in Dallas to discuss "institutional networks" could be the most significant for the conference in more than a year. During the 2010 spring meetings in Kansas City, the seeds were planted for Nebraska and Colorado to leave the conference. During those meetings, Texas reaffirmed its desire to start a network.

"Our goal is to keep this together," A&M AD Bill Byrne said. "I don't see anything contentious about it."

The league recently agreed to a lucrative 13-year, $1.2 billion deal with Fox for its secondary rights. It figures to score another windfall when its ABC/ESPN rights expire after 2015-16. But cracks already are beginning to appear nationally and in the Big 12. Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott reiterated last week what he told CBSSports.com in May.

" ... It's my view there will be further expansion down the road," Scott said during the Pac-12 media days.

Texas A&M appears to have leverage with a potential move to the SEC. That could lead to a tsunami of conference realignment if other conferences are forced to react within the marketplace.

Texas has long been speculated to become an independent if it isn't happy with the Big 12. (Although it has never been addressed what would happen with Texas' highly-competitive minor sports.) The school came within a heartbeat of joining the Pac-10 in 2010. A portion of Texas' contract with ESPN states that if Texas is not a member of a conference, ESPN would have 60 days to make an exclusive deal for those TV rights. It would have 48 hours to match any competing offer. That information was reported by the Austin American-Statesman after a Freedom of Information request.

Given the potentially shaky Big 12 partnership, a school like Missouri suddenly would have multiple options in perhaps the SEC, Big Ten, Big East, even the Pac-12. There is every indication, though, that the current situation will be resolved. That still doesn't mean the Big 12 is a long-term proposition.

The growing controversy over broadcasting high school games seems to have only two resolutions. Either it will happen or it won't. Texas and ESPN officials have said they are fine if the NCAA restricts the airing of high school games. Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe has put a moratorium on the practice until the issue is resolved.

Also at issue is Texas' intention to broadcast a conference game on TLN. That raises issues as to whether a conference member would be helping promote the network by its participation.

What you don't hear at the moment is Texas and ESPN backing down on their own on the issue of high school games. Technology, at this point, is moving faster than the NCAA's ability to react to it. Texas' intent to show high school content via broadband distribution and a coming Longhorn application has Texas A&M and others concerned.

Adding to the confusion is that Texas, the Big 12, NCAA and ESPN are all in a symbiotic relationship. Texas is a member of the Big 12 which is a member of the NCAA. All three have financial relationships with media giant ESPN.

Texas and ESPN announced the 20-year, $300 million partnership in January.

The Longhorn Network is the first individual school-centric endeavor on a major network (ESPN). It is launching Aug. 26 but not before having somewhat of a national referendum on the future of such businesses -- and possibly the Big 12 itself.

After a much-hyped, regents meeting earlier this month Texas A&M president R. Bowen Loftin said TLN's intentions create "uncertainty," in the Big 12. Missouri coach Gary Pinkel said last week it is "common sense" that Texas not air high school games. While proclaiming solidarity among conference members, commissioner Dan Beebe said, "Any time there is any kind of perceived crack, there's going to be a lot of vultures in the air."

The issue has attracted the attention of the NCAA which has called an Aug. 22 in Indianapolis to discuss the issue. Among those invited include Texas, Notre Dame and the Pac-12. All three have networks or aspirations of forming one.

At issue is whether the ESPN/Texas partnership creates an unfair recruiting advantage. In early June, TLN chief Dave Brown specified in a radio interview that the network intended to show up to 18 high school games as well as travel to other states to show the games of players who had committed to Texas. That's where A&M, and others took notice.

Texas A&M is lobbying the NCAA hard to the point that ruling in favor of Texas "may cause more than simply discussion and consternation among the NCAA membership. It may lead to undesirable developments, a fear of creeping recruiting advantage that compels members to try to create situations for themselves similar to the Longhorn Network ...

" ... then the next step," A&M states to the NCAA, "could easily be an initiative to broadcast nonscholastic events during the otherwise slow collegiate sporting event summer period and it does not take much of an imagination to target men’s and women’s basketball summer tournaments/camps as being of interest to sports fans."

The NCAA already has its hands full with controlling the influence of those non-scholastic events. Basketball is rife with abuses. The association's enforcement department is working diligently trying to control non-scholastic third party influences in football.

College athletics is watching the TLN situation closely. Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany said Thursday that the Big Ten Network is not interested in televising high school games at this time. That could change, he added, the NCAA allows it.

In that case, he said, "we'll probably have to take a look at it."

At the time the original legislation was passed in 1993, 24/7 networks dedicated to one school didn't exist. Texas A&M argued to the NCAA that "the intent and spirit of the rule was that these type of outside/independent entities ... have greater flexibility in conversations with high school-aged individuals ..."

Dodds said Texas would be not involved in selecting high school games to be broadcast.

"We'll just have to let the process work itself out," ESPN's Brown said last week. "We would have liked to have done them [high school games], one game a week, two games a week. If we have to go in another direction we will."

Coach Mack Brown said last week that high school coaches and players would be hurt most through lack of exposure if their games weren't broadcast.
Posted on: July 28, 2011 5:43 pm
Edited on: July 28, 2011 9:12 pm
 

Jim Delany talks accountability

CHICAGO -- Jim Delany says he has been involved in 40 infractions cases between his time as NCAA investigator, Ohio Valley commissioner and Big Ten commissioner. You'd think he'd have a sense for what is about to happen to Ohio State.

You'd also think he would agree with Ohio State vacating the 2010 season and offering probation as the only penalties resulting from Jim Tressel's misdeeds.

"I don't think I should comment on what they’ve [Ohio State] done," Delany said in a one-on-one interview after his address at the Big Ten media days. "They've done what they've done. Let's see what the NCAA thinks about it."

That's the issue. What is the NCAA going to think about it? The world of college athletics is waiting to see if Ohio State's seemingly meaningless self-penalization is enough. Delany was asked twice -- once by Todd Jones of Columbus Dispatch and once again by me moments later -- if the Ohio State case is a litmus test for enforcement process. In other words, have people lost faith in the system?


"No," Delany said. "Facts are stubborn. I've got confidence the [infractions] committee can sort out the coverage of this case versus the substance of this case and render a decision that makes some sense.

Some sense?

"Like I said, I don't always agree with them. I always think they're in the range of being right. Typically my attitude is, we got more than we deserved that's because I love the Big Ten. We go there, we go there humbly and we go there with facts."

There is the Aug 12 infractions committee hearing in Indianapolis. A lot of us think that is a tipping point for the NCAA enforcement process. 

I walked with Delany down a hall of the Hyatt Regency McCormick Place because there were so many more questions to ask. At the BCS meetings in April, he said coaches should be held to a much higher standard (than players) in terms of wrongdoing. Jim Tressel was allowed to "retire" with benefits. He said Thursday that the conference does not give him power to suspend coaches for NCAA violations. That explains why he shouldn't be held accountable for stepping in when Ohio State initially suspended Tressel for only two games.

Delany spent part of the day meeting with his coaches telling them they have to adhere to rules. It's embarrassing enough that the Ohio State case has become a national conversation. Folks are looking for answers from the man some consider the most powerful in college sports basically said the system has to change but it has to come from within.

"It's not the NCAA alone that needs to change, it's the conferences and institutions," he said.

In that sense, he's right. It's on the membership to change a perceived unfair enforcement process. But it's on the leaders to form that consensus. Delany made a huge statement Thursday when he all but endorsed Mike Slive's sweeping NCAA reforms proposed last week. 

"I think some of these things could be done in six months," he said. "Some of these things can be identified and worked on. I think it's over the next two years that we're going to have to address some of them. Mark's got to figure out a way, that's his job."

That would be Mark Emmert, NCAA president, who has convened a presidential retreat next month in Indianapolis. Slive put the talking points on the table. ACC commissioner John Swofford followed up this week by calling the current national climate that, "tipping point."

"I agreed with that," Delany said.
Category: NCAAF
Posted on: July 27, 2011 7:50 pm
 

North Carolina killed Butch Davis

North Carolina football killed Butch Davis. Not the other way around.

Sure, Davis is to blame for allowing the program to go rogue on his watch but that's part of my logic. A coach successful enough to get to the highest level of the NFL, a man diligent enough to bring Miami back from the brink of scandal in a relatively short amount of time, a man who then basically delivered Miami a national championship, caved.

He caved because he knew North Carolina was not your normal salvage job. Even in the mediocre ACC, North Carolina's football mediocrity stood out. The last coach to win 10 in Chapel was the first to do it in 16 years. Mack Brown got the hell out 14 years ago because he knew it couldn't last. Butch Davis took the job because he was the latest in a line to believe he could make a difference.

But knowing the history of North Carolina football Davis was desperate enough to hire John Blake, a guy he had known for 30 years. That's what makes the events of Wednesday even more tragic. It wouldn't have taken much because Carolina fans don't demand much.

That was Davis' greatest mistake. He should have known better. He didn't have to hire Blake, the coach by his notorious nickname "Black Santa". Davis knew Blake's recruiting coordinator's rep. Hell, it looks like he hired Blake because of the dark side of that rep.

Davis ultimately concluded that Blake is what Carolina needed because it's Carolina. There are reasons why the administration failed time after time to get it right, why a school with a glorious athletic tradition elsewhere has averaged 5 1/2 football wins since 1998. 

It was all there in front of Davis and he was getting close. A BCS bowl was possible, dangling out there in a league that is still waiting to be taken over by Florida State and Miami. Once again, it wouldn't have taken much: All Roy Williams needed was a football program his hoopsters could be proud of.

But John Blake? Really? The guy was apparently funneling players to an agent. Wasn't he making enough money as associate head coach at Carolina? Unlike Ohio State, Carolina got out ahead of this thing for the moment with Blake's forced resignation in September.

You will read elsewhere about how the school has handled the investigation and the timing of the firing but those are just details at this point. Davis' job security has been a topic for months. It matters that the move comes 5 1/2 weeks before kickoff but only if you believe that Carolina is going to get anyone of substance with the NCAA ready to clamp down. That has been a threat for months.

Now we just add Davis to the list of college coaches who are radioactive at the moment: Jim Tressel. Gary Barnett. Mike Leach. These guys would all be great replacements for Davis if they weren't, like him at the moment, unemployable at the college level. Welcome to 21st century college athletics.

Yes, there are other aspects to this story. Davis deserved to be fired because he let the program crumble underneath his feet. The tutor thing is just incomprehensible. It looks like the players were running the program. For all of those in deep thought about the cost-of-attendance issue, ask yourself if $200 a month would have kept some of those entitled Tar Heels happy. It probably wouldn't have paid for a couple of Greg Williams' tickets.

Tie it up in a big Carolina blue bow and the football program resembles Miami at the moment. That would be the program Butch Davis inherited in 1995, not the one he passed on to Larry Coker in 2001.

Renegade-to-renewal never works in reverse.

North Carolina coaching candidates

Before proceeding, let's make sure we're all on the same page here. It would be foolish for any of these coaches to the job right now. Expect Carolina to name an interim -- offensive line coach Sam Pittman was just bumped up to associated head coach. That guy will have to shepherd the program through the Oct. 28 infractions committee hearing. After THAT, comes the penalties perhaps early next year.

So before going all Malzahn or Mullen, consider that the program is most likely going to have its legs chopped off. Still ...

Mike Leach: If Carolina is looking for a proven academic head coach, he's their guy. Leach graduated 80 percent of his players at Texas Tech. It's interesting that Leach's lawsuits and the NCAA penalties could be finalized at the same time. Someone call Match.com.

Bill Cowher: Just keeps getting better with age, by sitting out. Cowher was Urban Meyer before Urban Meyer, content with spending time with his family. Doubt he would want to take on this burden.

Phil Fulmer: Proven. Rested. Ready. Age is a factor. Fulmer will be 61 on Sept. 1.

Gus Malzahn: Hey, he considered bumblin', stumblin' Vandy why not a crippled Carolina?

Dan Mullen: No way. His career is taking off. Why run it into the ground?

Rich Rodriguez: If it weren't for the NCAA violations at Michigan, this would be intriguing.
Posted on: July 26, 2011 6:55 pm
 

Pryor would not have played the '11 season

Now we know why Terrelle Pryor quit on his teammates last month. He didn't have a choice after refusing to cooperate with the NCAA.

Per the AP on Tuesday, Pryor would not have played for the entire 2011 season even after being suspended for the first five games of the season. There isn't any further explanation in the wire story but that does raise questions as to whether that had any bearing on the NCAA investigation into Jim Tressel.

Pryor's lawyer had been seeking clarification of the quarterback's status in regards to the NFL supplemental draft.

Ohio State "completely disassociated" Pryor from the program for five years. It is not believed that Pryor's reported non-cooperation would have impacted the school's position in the case.
Category: NCAAF
Posted on: July 25, 2011 4:20 pm
Edited on: July 25, 2011 8:43 pm
 

NCAA calls summit re: college networks

The NCAA has called an Aug. 22 summit to discuss collegiate networks, CBSSports.com learned Monday afternoon.

Texas received a letter dated Monday from Kevin Lennon, NCAA vice president for academic and membership affairs, inviting it to participate in an "educational summit regarding NCAA member and conference networks broadcasting youth sports." The growing issue of broadcasting high school games has become big enough for the main stakeholders to discuss the issue. The meeting will include representatives from Texas, BYU, the Big Ten, Notre Dame, the Pac-12 and the Mountain West. All of those entities have or are starting collegiate networks.

The move almost assures that The Longhorn Network will launch Aug. 26 without broadcasting high school games at least at the beginning of the season. The issue has become the latest hot-button offseason item in college sports because of Texas A&M's concern over Texas gaining a recruiting advantage.

"I'm stunned [at some of this]," said Texas AD DeLoss Dodds. "We've been saying the same thing from the beginning of this. We are not and will never do anything [to violate rules]. I'm a little surprised people would be concerned about us doing something."

Dodds added that the Big 12 ADs will meet Aug. 1 to discuss the issue. Those ADs, minus Texas, are still considering starting their own network. The issues are significant and confusing enough that the NCAA seemingly hasn't been able to rule on the legality of Texas broadcasting high school games.

"If you read Sports Business Journal or the New York Times, you'll see that viewership is up but attendance is down," said A&M AD Bill Byrne. "I'm worried about that. Everybody has a big flat screen. I've got one at my house. If it's a bad day, you don't have to go out to the ballgame, you can stay home. I worry about overexposure." 

Dodds also told CBSSports.com that Notre Dame may be interested in starting its own network after speaking to ND AD Jack Swarbrick.
Posted on: July 21, 2011 8:26 pm
 

Big 12 in uproar over Longhorn Network

At one point Thursday afternoon, I Tweeted "Big 12 making WAC look stable."

One Big 12 loyalist immediately shot back: "u know something we don't?"

Apparently. Start with the new, 13-month old league looking a lot like the 15-year old previous version of the Big 12 that almost disintegrated last year. It looks just as shaky and twice as disparate. Texas is starting a network on its terms. Everyone else in the Big 12 is having problems with those terms. They include televising high school games and as well as one conference game.

Several issues: Texas A&M, among others, isn't happy with Texas essentially having its own televised recruiting service. That, and conference rivals helping drive ratings and subscribers by playing Texas on its own network.

Commissioner Dan Beebe seemingly had calmed the waters by issuing a Thursday statement saying the issue needed "clarification" and that the league would "manage the interplay". Beebe concluded by saying the pause button had been it on TLN. It could show no more than one game (the opener against Rice) and no high school games until things were sorted out.

I thought these types of conflicts would be avoided for at least a few years. But who knew Texas and ESPN would launch a network without getting these issues resolved with the rest of the Big 12? Or maybe it doesn't matter. It's the other members -- particularly Missouri, Iowa State, Kansas and Kansas State -- who are just happy to be in a BCS conference at this point.

As one executive intimated to me this week: These schools DO understand why the conference stayed together, right?

Answer: Texas.

That kind of gives you a picture of where things stand at the moment. Texas has all the power, as usual. And most of the rest have to take it except for Texas A&M, and perhaps Oklahoma. A&M made it clear to me Wednesday that the administration is upset with comments made by TLN network chief Dave Brown, a long-time power broker in college football for ESPN. 

A&M and OU have some leverage, which translates into jumping to the SEC if pushed too far on this issue. Read this scathing statement from Aggies' AD Bill Byrne.

“I have continued to have concerns about the Longhorn Network since the original announcement by ESPN and Texas. Since last summer, the Big 12 member institutions have committed to work together in a spirit of unity and equality. Recent news reports concerning this network; however, have created a considerable amount of uncertainty.

We had an agreement in place that Big 12 members would have the right to one non-conference football game and four to six basketball games for third tier, or institutional rights. The concept of the Longhorn Network broadcasting two live football games -- with one of these being a conference game -- had not been discussed among the Big 12 athletic directors.

Our concerns were heightened further when news reports surfaced that the Longhorn Network would be broadcasting high school football games featuring Texas high school recruits, including recruits living outside the state of Texas. Knowing how restrictive NCAA rules are regarding any collegiate representative contacting prospects, we contacted the NCAA for an interpretation. We are still waiting for the NCAA's response.

I have continued to communicate our concerns to the conference office and my fellow athletic directors. We are pleased that the Commissioner has started to address these concerns, but many questions remain. These are significant issues for all of collegiate athletics as they relate to broadcast rights, revenue distribution and the recruitment of student-athletes.”


There it is. A&M ain't standing for it and -- best guess -- the SEC would take an Aggie-Sooner package in a heartbeat. That would likely set off a chain reaction of new conference realignment that could lead to the era of super conferences.

What's likely to happen? ESPN isn't going to risk the disintegration of the Big 12 (a partner) to show high school games on TLN (a different, new partner). ESPN made a financial commitment to the Big 12 last year to keep Texas in the fold, if for no other reason than the Horns having a launching pad for that network. Essentially, we're talking about Big 12 game inventory (a lot) being worth more than TLN's (a little) to ESPN.

If the NCAA doesn't rule that the high school games are an unfair recruiting advantage, Texas/ESPN will simply back down and not show them. It's worth it to keep everyone happy. Sources here at the SEC media days told me that the high school programming isn't a huge deal. It would be nice to have on the TLN but its absence is not going to wreck it.

Guess that means more re-runs of the Mack Brown Show. I'm sure A&M will be happy with that.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com