Tag:Oregon State
Posted on: August 29, 2008 9:31 am
 

Opening night thoughts

A lot of mediocre-to-bad football Thursday night. Some observations:

 It's going to be a long season for North Carolina State, 34-0 losers to South Carolina. Even with quarterback Russell Wilson, who was carted off the field with a concussion, the Wolfpack struggled to score points. You can see why 2007 incumbent Daniel Evans couldn't keep the job. When he replaced Wilson, the offense went from unproductive to putrid.

 


 The most impressive NC State player to me was Nate Irving, a redshirt sophomore linebacker who seemed to be in on every tackle. The Wolfpack did intercept four Tommy Beecher passes which might say more about South Carolina's offense than NC State's defense.


 Kirby Freeman went from Miami to Baylor to bench. After the quarterback's celebrated transfer from Coral Gables, 
he couldn't even make it through the first half against Wake Forest. Coach Art Briles kept his starter a secret up 
until kickoff. Why? Baylor just might have itself a quarterback of the future in true freshman Robert Griffin. The 
big-time recruit replaced the stiff, laconic Freeman and led the Bears to their only two scores. Not bad for a 
native of Japan. (His dad was military)

Briles is evaluating his options for next week against Northwestern State. Again, why? Let Griffin take this sunken ship over and try to raise it.

 Alphonso Smith is the truth. Wake Forest's preseason All-American corner is all that. He had an interception and 
tipped away a pass in the end zone in the first half. The Human Turnover Machine (12 by himself last season) has 15 
career interceptions.

 

 Wow, what was the deal with the Stanford crowd? I know it was a Thursday night in Palo Alto -- usually Pinochle night in P.A. -- but this was the season opener (against Oregon State). The announced crowd was 30,223 in 50,000-seat Stanford Stadium. That seemed very charitable.

 

 This is a sign of inexperience: Oregon State quarterback Lyle Moevao "threw" a safety. That's hard to do. Moevao 
dropped back from deep in his own territory to throw a swing pass. It was actually a backward pass that passed through the end zone and went out of bounds. The Beavers turned it over three times (five fumbles, one lost) in a 36-28 loss to the Cardinal.

 

 By the way what is Oregon State doing opening the season on the road against two BCS conference opponents? It goes 
to Penn State next week.

 

 My opening-night hero is Stanford's Toby Gerhart. Returning from a torn PCL he ran for 147 yards against the Beavs (No. 1 against the rush D in 2007). Not a huge deal, I just can't remember the last time a tailback of any substance was named Toby.

 


 Good luck to Ryan Perrilloux. His numbers were nice -- 203 yards in total offense -- but Georgia Tech was never 
threatened in a 41-14 victory over Jacksonville State. The opponent was only I-AA but Paul Johnson's triple option 
produced 349 rushing yards.


Posted on: August 21, 2008 11:46 pm
 

Cal's Jeff Tedford names a starting quarterback

Wow, should I be surprised by this? What does it say about Nate Longshore that he didn't get the starting job.
Here's the official release from Cal ...

BERKELEY – California head football coach Jeff Tedford has named sophomore
Kevin Riley as the Golden Bears’ starting quarterback for their opener
against Michigan State on Saturday, Aug. 30 at Memorial Stadium. Tedford
made the announcement following Thursday afternoon’s preseason practice
and said that senior Nate Longshore will also play in the opener.

“Kevin is going to start the first game,” Tedford said. “We feel like both
of them have had great camps, but Kevin’s going to take the first snaps
and we’ll see how it goes from there. Nate will play in the game; I don’t
know exactly when, but Kevin will start.

“We feel Kevin has had a good camp; they both have, we’re confident with
both of them. We feel like Kevin has the ability to make plays; we feel
great about Nate’s experience and knowledge and his play-making ability as
well. We want to see with the roles reversed, how that works. We’re
looking for the best chance to be successful.

“It’s so close, it’s going to continual evaluation.”

Riley saw action in four games last year as a redshirt freshman, throwing
for 563 yards and five touchdowns. In the Armed Forces Bowl last season,
Riley played the final three quarters and helped the Golden Bears erase a
21-0 deficit en route to a 42-36 victory. He connected on 16-of-19 passes
for 269 yards and three touchdowns to earn game MVP honors.

“I’m just getting ready for Michigan State,” Riley said. “It’s an honor to
be named the starter, especially after what Nate’s done at Cal. We’re in
good hands having two good quarterbacks here. I just have to prepare,
watch film and get ready for this game.

While both quarterbacks alternated opportunities working with the
first-string offense throughout camp, Tedford agreed that Riley became
more comfortable as camp went on.

“My first day with the one’s was probably my worst practice at camp,”
Riley said. “After that, I just calmed down and stopped thinking so much
and just played football. It’s continued through camp and every day I feel
like I’m getting better and better.”

Longshore ranks fourth all-time at Cal in passing efficiency (133.1),
sixth in passing touchdowns (62) and seventh in passing yardage (5,732).
He is also second all-time at Cal with 18 victories as a starting
quarterback.

Cal is one of just four teams in the Pac-10 with two quarterbacks
returning who have started games – UCLA (with three), USC and Oregon State
are the others. However, two of UCLA’s quarterbacks are injured and one of
USC’s has been out of action due to injury.

 

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: August 18, 2008 10:40 am
 

Five things you should know about the Pac-10...

1. The Slickster: He's back and he's here to stir up Westwood, L.A., That School Down The Road and the Pac-10. Rick 
Neuheisel will be the freshest thing to hit the league since, well, Pete Carroll. Get ready for the USC-UCLA rivalry to reignite.

2. Curse of the Trojans: A dislocated knee is one thing (quarterback Mark Sanchez) but it's getting ridiculous at 
USC. Offensive lineman Jeff Byers is being treated for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Running back Joe McKnight 
smashed his fingers in a doorjamb last year (ouch!). Don't forget an outbreak of jock itch.

3. Curse of the Trojans II: USC has developed a nasty habit of a conference loss that defies explanation. Last year, it was Stanford. The year before that it was Oregon State. Put a shotgun (formation) to my head and I'd have to say 
the Oct. 25 game at Arizona qualifies as this season's head scratcher.

4. Intersectionals: Never let it be said the Pac-10 is ducking the competition. It plays that brutal nine-game 
round-robin league schedule. It doesn't fill the non-cons with cream puffs either. The Pac-10 was 5-3 against BCS 
conference schools in non-conference games last season (No. 1 in the country). We'll know a lot about the Pac-10 
(and a lot of other conferences) early on. Consider these intersectional doozies ...

USC at Virginia, Aug. 30
Oregon State at Penn State; BYU at Washington, Sept. 6
Oklahoma at Washington, Ohio State at USC; UCLA at BYU, Sept. 13
Georgia at Arizona State, Sept. 20

A case can be made for the Pac-10 being favored in only two of those games, both USC games (Ohio State, Virginia).
 

5. The end of an era: Commissioner Tom Hansen ends more than a quarter century of service when he steps down after 
this academic year. An NCAA veteran of 16 years, Hansen joined the league in 1983. Things have been great -- the 
re-emergence of USC -- and embarrassment -- the recent officiating snafus -- but Hansen always added class and dignity to a tough job.

His replacement could signal a small crack in the staunch Pac-10 position against a plus-one depending on who is 
hired. The short list: Mountain West commissioner Craig Thompson, WAC commissioner Karl Benson and former 
Pacific/Dartmouth/Stanford AD Ted Leland.

Posted on: August 11, 2008 11:02 am
 

Five things you should know about the WAC

1. Don't expect Fresno State to imitate the baseball team: That would be winning a national championship. Football 
Fresno would settle for a BCS bowl. Again, not likely. Fresno gets orange juice only if it can win at Rutgers and 
UCLA and beat Wisconsin at home. That's for starters. The Bulldogs also have to go to Toledo and Boise State.

They start the season ranked on the fringes of the top 25. It's hard to believe Fresno hasn't won an outright 
conference title since 1989. This is Pat Hill's best team in years and the Bulldogs will be favored to win the WAC. 
But it won't be good enough to get to the Orange Bowl.

2. The team formerly known as Hawaii will drop off your radar: Colt Brennan and all his best receivers are gone. So 
is the coach (June Jones) who made it all happen. Quarterback Tyler Graunke faced academic problems early on. Oh 
yeah, and the Warriors start the season like they ended it -- in the belly of the SEC beast (August 30 at Florida).
 

3. Dead: That's what San Jose State football was before Dick Tomey took over in 2005. Since then the program has won 17 games and gone to a bowl. Three BCS conference transfers will help the Spartans challenge for a second bowl in 
four years. Cal transfer Kyle Reed will be in the fight at quarterback. Former Parade All-American and USC player 
Jeff Schweiger will do the same at defensive end. Corner Koye Francies comes over from Oregon State.

 
4. Vanderbilt is no New Mexico State: If you think the Commodores are having a tough time going to a bowl (its last 
was in 1982), check out the Aggies who haven't been to the postseason since 1960. That's the longest bowl drought in the country. Hal Mumme -- remember him? -- has 16 returning starters including productive quarterback Chase 
Holbrook.


5. The Louisiana Tech coach would have to fire himself: That's theoretically the case in Ruston, La. where coach 
Derek Dooley is also the AD. Vince Dooley's son raised hopes in his first season guiding the Bulldogs to a 5-7 
record. The quarterback situation is especially interesting with Auburn transfer Steve Ensminger and Georgia Tech 
transfer Taylor Bennett battling with holdover Ross Martin.

Posted on: April 10, 2008 12:49 am
Edited on: April 10, 2008 1:22 am
 

CFB national notes

Trying to sort out college football while wondering if Doyel scares small children sporting that dead beaver on his head ...

 Just wondering if Bill Self accepts that crazy/sick/monster money from Oklahoma State, what it does to the football side.

 

While $3 million is the new $2 million, college football has only one $4 million man in Alabama's Nick Saban. Does Oklahoma State's impending offer possibly cross sports and raise the bar for everyone. I'm told that hoops coaches around the country are hoping Self takes the money from OSU for obvious reasons. It would help everyone.

 Oregon offensive coordinator Chip Kelly added this nugget on how hard it is to evaluate talent: "All of us have only three weeks in December and three weeks in January (actually parts of November and February too for in-person contact). It's such a restrictive calendar, how are you evaluating someone that you're going to invest $150,000 in (in scholarship money) when all you have is bad high school film."

 

 Fresno's Pat Hill wasn't as upset as I thought when I called. Kansas State recently pulled out of a game to host the Bulldogs in September. It's almost unheard of do something like that less than six months until the beginning of the season. It was a heck of a message K-State coach Ron Prince was sending his players: We aren't good enough to beat a third-place team from the WAC in our own stadium.

 

"What can you say? It irritates me. (But) it worked out good for us," Hill said.

Thanks to a chance meeting with Greg Schiano at a Nike event, Hill started to find a replacement. A cable network getting involved and Fresno found Rutgers to replace K-State, in what will be one of the better early-season non-conference games. K-State picked up Montana State, an automatic W, to replace Fresno. Prince might be feeling some pressure to produce after sinking to 5-7 last season and lost the AD who hired him. Tim Weiser recently went to the Big 12 as a deputy commissioner.

Hill is used to such schedule shenanigans. His program long ago became too good for most I-A powers to play in non-conference games -- on the road or at home. Fresno is 12-14 against BCS-conference teams this decade but that's only half the point. Hill's anyone-anytime-anywhere philosophy means the Bulldogs have played an average of 3.25 BCS-conference schools each season since 2000.

Coming off a 9-4 season with 16 starters returning, Fresno arguably has the best chance of any non-BCS program to make it to a BCS bowl. The schedule gives them a chance. The season kicks off on Labor Day night at Rutgers. Wisconsin comes to Fresno on Sept. 13 before the Bulldogs visit UCLA on Sept. 27.

Hill has done himself no favors by battling some of the teams for which his team is supposed to roll over. USC had to fight to wire to win 50-42 in 2005 at the Coliseum. Fresno started 8-0 in 2001 beating Colorado, Oregon State and Wisconsin. Since 2004, Kansas State has lost twice to Fresno, including last season's 45-29 thrashing.

"If we were playing a real weak schedule, it would be a lot easier," said Hill who is entering his 12th season. "That's our niche, though. Not many West Coast teams are going home-and-home with us, and we're not going to play a bunch of I-AA games."

It's a Catch-22. Hill would have a better chance of going undefeated if he played an easier schedule, but that would make it harder to get a high BCS ranking. Playing a tough schedule gets the Bulldogs attention and a ranking, if they win. That's a big if.

Playing a weak schedule worked for WAC rival Hawaii last season. The difference was the Warriors at least were ranked going in (No. 23 preseason in AP).

"Lose and we just fall off the map," Hill said. "We just hate it."

 Notre Dame recently issued a tersely-worded e-mail to media covering the Irish. It basically warns media to stay away from recruits while they're on campus. Fair enough. Interviewing or photographing recruits while they are on campus can land a program in NCAA hot water.

 

Where ND stepped over the line is this passage: " ... any attempt by you or your staff members to contact ... any prospective student-athlete while they are in the South Bend area for the purpose of visiting our campus may be cause for sanctions ..."

Let's see, would that include a certain publicity-hound quarterback who called his own press conference "in the South Bend area" (College Football Hall of Fame, actually) to announce his commitment? We're talking about Jimmy Clausen who  sought the attention two years ago, coming to the press conference with an ESPN camera crew in tow.

ND has overstepped its authority with that last passage. On campus, we understand the concerns. Other than that, we can call recruits, we can call their parents, we can drive to their houses to interview them. We can talk to them when they come to campus -- just not on campus. Remember, these are recruits, public figures, not the property of Notre Dame.

If the school wants to keep us from interviewing the Jimmy Clausens of the world, tell the Jimmy Clausens to stop seeking the limelight.

 The play calling will stay in the family but Steve Spurrier is ready to delegate duties. http://www.charleston.net/news/2008
/apr/05/spurrier_its_time_delegate3
6233/

 

 A former big-time recruit at San Diego State is facing murder charges.

 

http://www.signonsandiego.com/sport
s/aztecs/20080408-9999-1s8azfoot.ht
ml

 This Joe Paterno contract situation might come to an end soon. One resolution being talked about is that JoePa goes on a year-by-year contract. Paterno doesn't seem to be concerned about the recruited repercussions. His current contract expires after this season.

 

 What kind of country club was being run at Michigan previous to Rich Rodriguez? Part of the reason given by offensive lineman Justin Boren for leaving the team is that linemen had to run to the line out of the huddle. 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com