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Tag:Tennessee
Posted on: September 14, 2009 4:34 pm
Edited on: September 15, 2009 9:54 am
 

Breaking down the polls and Heisman race

USC walks into the belly of the beast, slays Ohio State with a dramatic game-winning drive and picks up two first-place votes in the coaches’ poll. One in AP.

Obviously, Florida is still the overwhelming No. 1 in both polls but I’m already starting to wonder what it would take to pass the Gators if they keep winning. The two teams below them are from different conferences (Texas, USC) and don’t play each other. No. 4 Alabama doesn’t play Florida in the regular season.

At first glance, Florida looks safe. It has 56 of the 60 first-place votes in the AP poll and 56 of the 59 votes on the coaches’ poll. Those numbers didn't change after the Gators mopped The Swamp with Troy, 56-6. 

The other teams getting first-place votes are Texas (one in AP), USC (a combined four) and Alabama (two in AP).

The rest of the way Florida plays only two teams that are currently ranked (LSU and Georgia). Same for Alabama (Ole Miss, LSU). Texas faces five ranked teams (Texas Tech, Oklahoma, Missouri, Oklahoma State and Kansas). USC plays one (Cal, Oregon State).

Alabama had a similar lead at No. 1 before it lost to Florida in last year’s SEC title game. The Tide had 58 of the 61 first-place votes going in. After Bama lost and Oklahoma and Florida won their championship games, the final regular-season coaches’ poll was the closest in the BCS era.

Oklahoma (31 first-place votes, 1,482 points) ended up one point ahead of Florida (26 first-place votes, 1,481 points). Third-place Texas had four and 1,408.

Just for grins, I figured up the top six final regular-season first-place vote getters since 2004:

1. USC, 90 1/3 points
2. Ohio State, 62
3.  Oklahoma, 49 1/3
4. Florida, 26
5. LSU, Texas, 11
6. Auburn, 9 1/3

 One of the better poll results Saturday was Florida State beating Jacksonville State. I know, I know, FSU has looked shaky and isn’t ranked.

But this is about BYU. The Cougs need FSU to win as often as possible, aside from this week when the Noles go to Provo. If FSU somehow gets back into the polls, BYU could make a more solid case for playing for the national championship. If it goes undefeated, it would have beaten four ranked teams (Oklahoma, Florida State, TCU and Utah). 

If you’re wondering where this going consider that total would be more than Florida, LSU or USC.

 If the BCS championship game were played today, it would be USC vs. Alabama according to our old friend Jerry Palm. Check out the most accurate BCS projections and collegebcs.com.

 Live by the pass, die by the pass: SMU’s nine interceptions lead the country but it has thrown four interceptions which ties for third-most nationally ... Notre Dame's Jimmy Clausen has thrown the most passes this season without an interception, 76 ... Purdue is  home of the leading rusher (Ralph Bolden) and the quarterback who is tied for No. 1 in interceptions. Joey Elliott is tied Tennessee's Jonathan Crompton. Each have six.


The right-now, no-hype, no-b.s., not-what-they-did last year Heisman rankings for this week

Case Keenum, Houston: When he lost his coach (Art Briles who went to Baylor) everyone thought Keenum would go in the tank, or transfer. He bonded immediately with second-year coach Kevin Sumlin who might make him a Heisman finalist. Keenum threw for 366 yards against Oklahoma State as the Cougars beat a top-five team for the first time in 25 years.

Tim Tebow, Florida: Four passing touchdowns and one rushing in the rain against Troy add to the legend.

Colt McCoy, Texas: Three passing touchdowns against Wyoming in Texas’ 15th consecutive non-conference win. That ties a school record.

Max Hall, BYU: A week after beating Oklahoma, Hall gets a rocking-chair game against Tulane. Led the Cougars to scores in seven of eight possessions.

Dion Lewis, Pittsburgh: A workhorse freshman who is averaging 7.4 yards per carry.

 

 

Posted on: September 13, 2009 4:31 pm
 

Thoughts on a football Saturday

Charlie Weis doesn’t get off easy on this one. It was his coaching decision that left Michigan just enough time left on the clock to beat the Irish on Saturday.

Prior to Michigan’s game-winning drive, Weis elected to pass on second and third down. Both passes fell incomplete, stopping the clock and allowing Michigan to take over with 2:19 remaining and two timeouts left.  Just enough, it turned, down for Rich Rod to nail down the dramatic win he needed.

When Weis as asked about the play calling he said something about going for the win. Maybe, but would Bill Belichick have signed off on those passes in that situation if Weis was still his offensive coordinator?

  Horseshoes and hand grenades would like to welcome Ohio State to its exclusive club. It’s getting to the point now that just playing close is a sign of progress for the Buckeyes.

Prior to Saturday, USC had won its last nine against Big Ten teams by an average of 23.8 points.

  Clip and save:  Special teams might just up and grab USC down the line. Kicker Jordan Congdon missed a makeable 44-yard field goal against Ohio State [hitting the crossbar]. Punter Billy O’Malley let a high but catchable snap slips through his hands for a safety. O’Malley, a walk-on from Cleveland, averaged 37.6 yards on five punts.  A 24-yarder last week against San Jose State allowed the Spartans to score their only points.

  It sure would have helped the hype if Tennessee beat UCLA. [Wait for it …] No, it wouldn’t. Gainesville is getting fired up for the Lane Violation on Saturday.

“We’re thinking about Tennessee right now,” Florida linebacker Ryan Stamper said.

  Indiana, perhaps the Big Ten’s worst program, is 2-0 for the sixth consecutive year.

  OBC alert: Steve Spurrier must be pulling his hair out. A week after holding North Carolina State to three points, his defense allowed 41 to Georgia. Two suddenly potent teams combined for 735 yards and 78 points in Georgia’s 41-37 victory. That’s the second biggest total in the series’ history.

South Carolina ran 30 more plays than Georgia and outgained the Dawgs 427-308. The Gamecocks had the ball fourth-and-four at Georgia’s seven but Stephen Garcia couldn’t convert.

  Texas Tech going to Texas this week suddenly looks interesting. Tech’s Taylor Potts threw for seven touchdowns against Rice. Graham Harrell’s successor completed passes to 13 different receivers.

  The best thing about BYU’s day was not its 54-3 victory over Tulane. It’s that Florida State rallied late to beat I-AA Jacksonville State 19-9. An FSU loss would have dealt an early blow to BYU’s BCS hopes. You know, strength of schedule and all that.

 

Posted on: September 11, 2009 12:59 pm
 

Son of Weekend Watch List

The last time USC visited Ohio State, John Cooper gave up.

No, really. He gave up.

I was there and saw it at The Horseshoe. It was 1990 and the teams were ranked 18 and 12 or something like that. It wasn’t a huge game but it turned out being one of the weirdest in Ohio State history. It certainly didn’t help Coops standing with Bucknuts.

USC ran for 331 yards and would have had more – if the game was completed. The second-half was played in a dangerous lightning storm. After USC recovered an onside kick with 2:36 left the game was stopped. Too risky, the officials deemed.

USC won 35-26. Sure, the game was out of reach but you never know, right? One report stated that Cooper told officials that if the onside kick didn’t work, that was it.

The way I remember it after a lengthy delay, the skies cleared somewhat and officials came to Cooper and asked if he wanted to continue. Nah, we’re good, Coop said. Game over.

"We had some momentum," Ohio State quarterback Greg Frey told the Associated Press last year. "I had been down this road before. I'm thinking, 'We've got a ton of time.' "


I distinctly remember Ohio State president Gordon Gee (during his first term at the school) muttering some sort of disparaging remark as I passed him on the stairs to the interview room.

The situation certainly didn’t help Cooper with Ohio State fans. He would go on to bang his head against the wall against Michigan.

  You missed a lot Thursday if you weren’t on a CBS conference call previewing the network’s SEC package.

The participants were Philip Fulmer, Verne Lundquist, Gary Danielson, Spencer Tillman and Tim Brando. Some of these comments are bombastic – and great.

Danielson on Tim Tebow: “He does have a ways to go to be a professional quarterback. I’m one of those people who believe that’s his only position in the NFL.

"I don’t think he’s a tight end. I don’t think he’s a fullback. I don’t think he’s fast enough … He does need to learn to be more of a pro-style quarterback."

Fulmer on Lane Kiffin: “If you’re going to be brash you better be able to back it up.”

Brando on Kiffin: “What Lane Kiffin has done is energize the base. It’s what Sarah Palin did to the Republican Party. It doesn’t necessarily mean he’s going to be successful but he energized the base.”

Danielson on Florida’s invincibility: “There were two unbeatable teams in the modern BCS. The Miami team of 2002. It had 14 first-round draft choices on it, eventually. It lost to an Ohio State team that kicked field goals all year.

“That USC team (in 2005), out of their 12 games they scored more than 50 points seven times and they lost the championship game. Florida can easily lose a game (and still be champions).”

Danielson on LSU: "I felt that Les Miles lost his team last year by sticking too long with his quarterback (Jarrett Lee) … He benched everybody else but he failed to bench his quarterback. I thought he lost his team the second half of the season.”

Brando on prize LSU freshman Russell Shepard: “According to people I’ve talked to, his (off-field) abilities are Tebow-esque … On the field what he can do is similar to Percy Harvin.”

Danielson on Shepard: “If Russell Shepard is the leader of this team, they are not going to be a good football. If Florida would have hung it on Tebow, Florida would not have been good the first year either.”

Tillman on Shepard: “His talent is literally off the charts. This kid is more gifted than Vince Young was at this point in time.”

Fulmer on LSU defensive coordinator John “Chief” Chavis:
“I hired him when nobody knew him at all … On a very poor football team offensively; I think we had the third or fourth-ranked defense in the country." (Tennessee was No. 3 last season.)

Danielson on Chavis: “He will not approach is stats last year at Tennessee. People who played Tennessee knew they didn’t have to score many points. People who play LSU know they are going to have to score points.”

Fulmer on Tim Tebow: “There’s nobody who is all of that. Well, Tim Tebow is all of that He put that team on his shoulders after the loss and won the championship … I’m sitting in the box (at the SEC championship game) and he puts the team on his shoulders again in the fourth quarter and goes on to win the national championship."

Lundquist on Tebow: “I’ve never seen anybody quite like him. There’s this danger we all have of going overboard. He walks the walk as the old phrase goes. He is remarkable.”

Danielson on Sam Bradford: “I personally wish … that Bob Stoops would have said to Sam Bradford, ‘I’m sorry I can’t let you play for my team this year. I can’t risk $70 million knowing some guard could turn a linebacker loose and blow your arm and your knee.’ I thought Sam should have been in the NFL.”

Brando on the Heisman race: “There is a backlash that Tim (Tebow) faces this year because he can’t be all that. There was a clear media backlash against Peyton Manning in his last year at Tennessee.”

Fulmer: "Don’t get me going on that subject."

Brando on BYU: It's really going to incense the SEC fan base more than any. It could come to an unbeaten BYU against a one-loss SEC team. Who do you take (for the BCS title game)? If BYU runs the table from this point forward. They have the schedule to give them the credibility that no other non-BCS team has had.

"You talk about shaking the rafters. If BYU is there and are denied, Sen. Orrin Hatch is going to have some fun ..."

Category: NCAAF
Posted on: September 5, 2009 6:19 pm
 

6 p.m. ET update on the day's action

Big day for the Big 12. Baylor and Missouri have double-digit leads. Oklahoma State leads Georgia 17-10. All three are playing BCS conference opponents. Stayed tuned.

 You got enough Tennessee? Nice debut by Lane Kiffin, even though it was a body-bag game against Western Kentucky.

 As inspiring as Navy’s effort was against Ohio State, that was a horrible call on the two-point conversion. Navy quarterback Ricky Dobbs took a three-step drop and threw into three Buckeyes. The ball was picked off and returned for a two-pointer.

At that point, Dobbs was the star of the game because of his arm and his feet. Navy’s electric qb should have been allowed to roll out and have a run/pass option.

 Ohio State showed absolutely nothing scheme-wise in getting ready for USC. Nor should it. Obviously, the playbook is being saved for the Trojans.

 Jim Tressel almost blew it by not going for the field goal on fourth-and-2 from Navy’s 15 with 6:30 left. in Navy territory. The Middies held. On the next play, Dobbs, my new favorite quarterback, threw an 85-yard touchdown pass.

Yes you read that right: A Navy receiver beat two Ohio State defenders down the middle for 85 yards.

This was almost a disaster for Tressel who was trying to vanilla his way into next week. 

 Someone will have to explain to me why, when you’re developing Terrelle Pryor, that backup Joe Bauserman gets a series. I know Bauserman is a hard worker, good athlete and former walk-on who earned a scholarship but those are valuable snaps, especially during the two-minute drill, that Pryor could use.

Can you condemn a guy for his eye black? It looked like Pryor was wearing those stickers below his eyes that read “Mike” and “Vick”.
Posted on: August 26, 2009 10:55 pm
 

Tennessee catches a break. NCAA has a soul

I'm shocked. Relieved for Brian Butler, but shocked.

Tennessee freshman Bryce Brown escaped NCAA jail on Wednesday. The association decided not to penalize tailback Bryce Brown after looking into his recruitment. I had written last week that the investigation centered around a former NFL player who had funded an "academic tour" that Brown was a part of in high school. 

Butler had organized the tour and repeatedly said it was on the up and up. Again, I'm glad he was right but I was getting ready to write otherwise. I thought I had discovered a link between that NFL donor and one of the schools that Brown had visited on the tour. By strict definition of the extra benefits rule, the NCAA could have come down hard on Brown. Wenesday's wire story mentioned that the NCAA was getting ready to suspend him for four games.

Do I think the donor was steering Brown toward his old school? Absolutely not. But I've seen the NCAA bring down the hammer for less. This proves that the association, at least in this case, has common sense. A soul? I'll need further metaphysical evidence. 
Category: NCAAF
Tags: Tennessee
 
Posted on: June 30, 2009 12:05 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2009 12:34 pm
 

Picking the SEC

You're tired. We're all tired.

Of the SEC.

That doesn't mean you shouldn't believe the hype. Since it expanded in 1992, the SEC has won seven national championships in 17 years, four of the last six and three in a row. It generally sends the most players to the NFL, approximately 36 a year since 1990. How many leagues can narrow the national championship race to one game? Since 2006, the winner of the LSU-Florida game has been the national champion.

Nowhere else does one agent (Jimmy Sexton) represent half the league's coaches. The SEC produces the most draft picks, the most talent, the best stories. Open a browser. You'll find something about Lane Kiffin somewhere.

This season, Florida opens the season as the consensus No. 1 chasing a third national championship in four years. Only two other schools have accomplished that feat in the wire service era: Notre Dame (1946-47, 49), Nebraska (1994-95, 1997).

Let's not forget those lucrative new TV contracts from CBS and ESPN. In the SEC, money flows downhill -- into league coffers.

Tired of the SEC? Too bad. You'll have to pay attention. Once again, the winner of the league will probably be in contention for the BCS title game.

Picking the SEC ...


West Division

1. Alabama -- They've dismissed the Sugar Bowl as a fluke in Tuscaloosa long ago. They'd rather remember how Bama went undefeated in the regular season and was No. 1 for several weeks. Nine returning starters on defense is a good place to start. New quarterback Greg McElroy better find Julio Jones often. A rebuilt offensive line will try to spring Mark Ingram (12 touchdowns as a freshman). The magic of St. Nick gets the nod in this packed division.

2. LSU -- Don't agonize over Jordan Jefferson at quarterback. LSU has won two national championships with, shall we say, less than dynamic quarterbacks. Crazy Les has the SEC's best running back (Charles Scott) and at least one NFL draft pick (Ciron Black) on the offensive line. After the co-coordinator thing failed on defense, Miles went out and got the best player on the board -- John Chavis, formerly of Tennessee.
 
3. Ole Miss
-- Until Ole Miss actually does it, they can't be the pick in the West. I know Jevan Snead might be the league's best pro prospect at quarterback. I know Greg Hardy can beat anyone off the edge. I know that Alabama and LSU come to Oxford. I know that Houston Nutt is underrated as a coach.  I just can't get over the fact that after beating Florida, Ole Miss lost at home to South Carolina. There's a clunker out there somewhere that will keep the Rebels from winning the West.
 
4. Arkansas -- Bobby Petrino has himself a quarterback. That's a good start. Ryan Mallett has the best pure arm in the SEC. The problem is defense and special teams. Petrino has never been known for his defensive prowess. The D surrendered more than 31 per game last season. Until that gets corrected, the Hogs won't compete in the West. Petrino wisely hired old buddy John L. Smith to run the special teams. Mallett punted in the spring. Hopefully, that won't have to be the case in the fall.
 
5. Auburn -- Let's see, Tony Franklin was fired because players had a hard time picking up his offense. His replacement at offensive coordinator is Gus Malzahn, basically runs the same offense. Let's hope Malzahn is a better communicator because his offenses might play faster than anyone in the country. Gene "5-19" Chizik has a lot to prove after coming over from Iowa State. It won't be this year.

6. Mississippi State -- All the buzz is coming from Oxford. For good reason. Dan Mullen tried to install his version of the spread in the spring with fewer than five receivers on the roster. That will change in a hurry as Mullen says he wants at least a dozen receivers to get playing time. But as his old boss found out, the passing game comes second. Mullen better be able to run the ball first and find some defensive linemen who can come off the edge.


East Division

1. Florida -- How's the view from the top? It is Florida's division, conference and national championship to lose. Every starter is back on defense. A guy named Tebow seems to have won the quarterback job. Now the question is, who replaces Percy Harvin? Meyer says he won't do it by committee. Watch for Jeff Demps, Chris Rainey and incoming recruit Andre Debose to take their shots. After two titles in three years, the further motivation is Florida's first undefeated season.

2. Georgia -- Strange, but the Bulldogs seem like they're going to be OK. Joe Cox doesn't have to light it up in replacing Matt Stafford, just manage the game. Receiver A.J. Green is a year older and bigger. There are two stars on defense -- defensive tackle Geno Atkins and linebacker Rennie Curran. The last time the expectations were this low, 2005, Georgia won the SEC East. It's going to take a win over Florida to do it, so a division title isn't likely. But 10 wins out of this group isn't out of the question.

3. South Carolina -- Steve Spurrier's greatest trait is his honesty. When asked at the SEC spring meetings if quarterback Stephen Garcia was ready to take over he didn't hesitate. Still needs some work, Spur Dog said. If Spurrier can't get the quarterback thing right, what hope is there for the rest of the Gamecocks? They have faded late in each of the last two seasons. Spurrier has averaged seven wins in his four seasons and has produced just one bowl win. At 64, Spurrier is committed. Is his quarterback, who has had legal problems?

4. Kentucky -- UK's run of three consecutive bowl wins might be in danger. Mike Hartline must show he can become a solid SEC quarterback. Randall Cobb remains a wild card, in a good way, as a quarterback, punt returner and receiver. Rich Brooks has his best defensive line since coming to Kentucky. He wants to get the Cats into the top 25 on a regular basis before turning things over to coach-in-waiting Joker Phillips.

5. Tennessee -- Behind the bluster, is this: Tennessee isn't particularly good. The offense is going to be painful to watch -- again. Lane Kiffin has yet to sign the quarterback who will define his success in Knoxville. His best hope at the position might be All-American safety Eric Berry who should get some snaps behind center. If the offensive line holds up, maybe super freshman Bryce Brown can keep the Vols in the hunt. Guru Monte Kiffin gets a head start with athletes on his side of the ball. Defense wasn't the problem last season.

6. Vanderbilt -- After going 26 years between bowls, Vandy just might be getting started. Coach Bobby Johnson gets all five offensive line starters back. The defense that allowed less than 20 points per game is stout as well. It will be typical Commodores in that they will struggle to score but hang in with defense. The Nov. 21 regular-season finale at Tennessee could have a lot on the line.

 

 

Posted on: June 9, 2009 8:38 pm
Edited on: June 9, 2009 11:10 pm
 

Secondary violations and Kiffin

Lane Kiffin is at it again. This time with what could be secondary violation No. 6.

You've no doubt heard that Kiffin might have broken NCAA rules by allowing a recruit to filmed in his office by a cable network. The question that popped into my mind was, when do enough secondary violations equal a major violation.

Short answer: It's complicated. Complicated answer: It's really complicated which is why so many coaches are willing to push the envelope when it comes to recruiting.

"There isn't a magic number," said one Division I-A compliance director, "but if you're violating the same rule more than once on different occassions, that's a problem."

Secondary violations are minor infractions that are sometimes inadvertent. Complicating matters further is the severity of those minor violations. The NCAA breaks them down by Level 1 and Level 2 violations. Level 1 is more serious and involves intentional violations as well as similar violations in the same sport.

Sound familiar, Tennessee?

All Level 1 violations are reported directly to the NCAA. The less serious Level 2 violations are reported to the conference. Those Level 2s must be filed with the NCAA en masse once a year.

The compliance director suggested that if the NCAA deems the infraction serious enough the recruit who appeared with Kiffin on TV could be ruled ineligible to attend the school. Tennessee then would have to seek reinstatement to keep recruiting the kid. 

"I really believe the majority of violations out there are unintentional," the director said. 

Auburn recently had the idea of traveling around the state in limos to impress recruits. Completely legal. However, the football program might have broken rules recently during a so-called Big Cat Weekend. Recruits were allowed to "roll" Toomer's Corner with toilet paper, a longtime tradition after big Auburn victories. Fans, police, media, even the mascot were present.

That could be a secondary violation -- several of them -- because it simulates a game-day setting. Yeah, I know, toilet paper and trees don't conjure up game day but that's exactly what it is at Auburn.

I found out firsthand what these secondary violations mean to some coaches. New Mexico coach Mike Locksley allowed me to sit in on a staff meeting the day before signing day this year.  Commanding the meeting, Locksley impressed upon his staff that he wanted to lead the Mountain West in self-reporting violations.

A minor controversy erupted at New Mexico when I published what Locksley told his staff, " "It's OK to make a mistake -- secondary violations, We want to lead the conference in them." There was laughter in the room but the point had been made. It's not the number of secondary violations that necessarily matter. It's about being forthcoming with the NCAA.

They were nervous at New Mexico when the quote came out because the program already is on probation from wrongdoing during the previous coaching regime. But Locksley showed me in that meeting he knew more about NCAA rules than anyone in the room. The 39-year-old coach, a tireless recruiter, was also well aware of his reputation in some coaching circles as a guy who pushes the edges of the NCAA Manual.

"As coaches it's almost a compliment," Locksley told me. "It's almost like having a beautiful girlfriend or wife and people are staring at her. If you're a good recruiter, people are going to accuse you of cheating."

So how beautiful a girlfriend do you want to date? In a recent Columbus Dispatch investigation, the newspaper found that Ohio State had reported an incredible 375 violations since 2000. That's the most of any of the 69 Division I-A schools who responded to the paper's Freedom of Information requests.

That number is tempered with the fact that Ohio State sponsors the most sports in the country, 36.

Rick Neuheisel had a part in more than 50 secondary recruiting violations while at Colorado.  Neuheisel, then at Washington, was prohibited from recruiting off campus for a time. His former school was placed on probation, docked scholarship and had off-campus recruiting limited.

To say some of these secondary violations are unintentional is a bit misleading. In fact, a lot misleading. If compliance directors don't know this stuff is going on they should. If they don't tell the coach to knock it off, they should lose their jobs. Of course, at a lot of schools when the head coach doesn't want compliance to know something it isn't known.

Schools have proven that the slap on the wrist they receive is worth it. If Kiffin wants attention for his program, he certainly has it. One of the violations reportedly had to do with a fake press conference set up to impress nine recruits. A fog machine was reportedly used in January, simulating pre-game introductions.

Taking all that into account, six secondary violations don't seem to be that many. I'm no expert but it seems Kiffin will get both his attention and a sore wrist.

Guess which one he cares about?

Posted on: June 5, 2009 3:36 pm
 

Predicting the bling ...

We're all Heisman candidates in June. Mom, dad, the plumber, the cat. Well, maybe not the cat.

This is the time of year to salute every swinging hick who dares to dream of a trip to New York. With that in mind, here are my Heisman rankings.

1. Colt McCoy, Texas -- It's his time. Among the Three Amigos, it's his turn.
2. Tim Tebow, Florida -- Voters will be wary of making Superman a two-time winner. There has only been one.
3. Sam Bradford, Oklahoma -- Back-to-back ain't happenin' either.
4. Jevan Snead. Ole Miss -- This year's Matt Stafford.
5. Jahvid Best, Cal -- No. 3 rusher last season, should be the nation's leading rusher in 2009.
6. Jonathan Dwyer, Georgia Tech -- The hoss in Paul Johson's option offense.
7. Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State -- Cowboy No. 1
8. Kendall Hunter, Oklahoma State -- Cowboy No. 2
9. Zac Robinson, Oklahoma State --  Cowboy No. 3
10. Case Keenum, Houston -- 5,000-yard passer.

The others -- Arrelious Benn, Illinois; Eric Berry, Tennessee; Dezmon Briscoe, Kansas; Daryll Clark, Penn State; Jimmy Clausen, Notre Dame; Aaron Corp, USC; Noel Devine, West Virginia; A.J. Green, Georgia; Jermaine Gresham, Oklahoma; Max Hall, BYU; Greg Hardy, Ole Miss; Tim Hiller, Western Michigan; Jerry Hughes, TCU; Colin Kaepernick, Nevada; Julio Jones, Alabama; Dan LeFevour, Central Michigan; MiQuale Lewis, Ball State; Jake Locker, Washington; Taylor Mays, USC; Kellen Moore, Boise State; DeMarco Murray, Oklahoma; Terrelle Pryor, Ohio State; Todd Reesing, Kansas; Jacquizz Rodgers, Oregon State;  Charles Scott, LSU; Brandon Spikes, Florida; Triumph the Insult Comic Dog; The Kobe and LeBron puppets; Zach Galifianakis; Conan O'Brien; Lassie; David Letterman; Iron Man; Alex Trebek, Tina Fey, shall I go on?

 

Bednarik/Nagurski Award (best defensive player): Jerry Hughes, TCU

Biletnikoff Award (best receiver): Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State

Broyles Award (best assistant coach):  John Chavis, LSU defensive coordinator

Groza Award (best kicker): Kai Forbath, UCLA

Ray Guy Award (best punter): Derek Epperson, Baylor

Lombardi Award (best lineman): Greg Hardy, Ole Miss

Mackey Award (best tight end): Jermaine Gresham, Oklahoma

Davey O'Brien Award (best quarterback): Colt McCoy, Texas.

Butkus Award (best linebacker):  Brandon Spikes, Florida

Outland Trophy (best interior lineman):  Ciron Black, LSU

Rimington Trophy (best center): Kristofer O'Dowd, USC

Eddie Robinson Award (coach of the year):  Paul Johnson, Georgia Tech

Thorpe Award (best defensive back): Eric Berry, Tennessee

Doak Walker Award (best running back):  Jahvid Best, Cal

 

 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com