Tag:Ian Kennedy
Posted on: August 12, 2011 1:50 pm
Edited on: August 12, 2011 1:52 pm
 

Love Letters: The Colt (not Indy Colts) edition

Waaaay behind in the mailbag department. The problem? Duh: I haven't been able to get to the Post Office to get stamps. ...

FROM: Rochelle:
Re.: Newest Phillie a perfect fit in Pence-ylvania

Great article. I think it's funny you referred to Hunter as a young colt ... because he was. He went to Arlington High School with me and we were the Colts.

I'll bet you were.

FROM: Ben

Hey Scott, guess the Yanks didn't fleece everyone when they gave up Ian Kennedy, Phil Coke and Austin Jackson for Curtis Granderson in that 3-way trade with Detroit and 'Zona. For all the crap the Yankees take about them not being able to raise pitchers, looks like Kennedy is doing great as the No. 1. of the D'Backs staff. So let me get this straight going forward so we're consistent in our analysis. When it is a young pitcher and he is in NY, he has zero time to grow and improve himself, otherwise he is an overrated NY prospect. But if he comes into his own elsewhere, then it is OK? Plus I'm assuming all the other young pitchers in other systems are allowed to be eased into the big leagues with no stupid scrutiny that the media pays to young NY players? I'm convinced that the media, not the Yankees, ruined Joba's chances at having a normal chance of becoming a frontline starter. Anywhere else, he would've been given the chance, but since it is preposterous in the media's eyes to allow the Yankees to grow their own starters, he failed.

Hey Ben, you play in New York, you pay in New York. Your points are accurate. The problem is inherent in the Yankees' $200 million payroll and in who they are: They themselves will tell you their goal every year is not simply to compete, but to win the World Series. By that self-proclaimed definition, no, the young pitchers do not get fair time to grow and develop in the Bronx. It's true.

FROM: David
Re.: Weekend Buzz: Pirates, Indians on the move, fortified by July

Scott,

Are we jumping the gun here? Cleveland is one game over .500 and Pittsburgh is two. The Sox and Yanks are not going to get worse as we head into the home stretch and the Phillies may have the best rotation ever assembled. I realize you have to keep people from all areas of the US interested in your smack, but I have to give you the NFL version of C'mon Man!!!

Fair enough, my man. You bet I was jumping the gun. When it's July and the Pirates are in first place, you jump! We'll have plenty of time in September, October (and November, December, January and beyond) to dissect the Yankees, Red Sox and everyone else.

FROM: Robert W.
Re.: With slump behind Jimenez, why would Rockies deal him?

Well, I can see you are obviously a Yankees and Red Sox hater. Why, when writing a story about a pitcher getting traded, you have to make a comment like that when the Phillies are the team that is buying the pitching? Way to go with an unbiased opinion, jackass!!!

I'm not quite sure to which comment you're referring. Lots of pithy, witty and intelligent comments leave me open to being called "jackass" by those who wish they were as creative as yours truly. My compliments, by the way, to your read of me being both a Yankees AND Red Sox hater. Most of the time, I get one of those sides accusing me of hating their team.

FROM: Doc

I don't think people give the Rockies pitchers enough credit. It's a miserable place to pitch. Curves don't curve, so you end up screwing around with your pitch selection, always fearful of the long ball. Typically N.L.pitchers coming to the A.L see their ERAs go up anywhere from 0.5 to 1.0 runs. I'll bet Jimenez injected into a pennant race will see his go down. I wish him good luck!! Seems like a good kid.

He is a good kid and Cleveland can really, really use the help.

FROM: Tony D.

Be honest. Have you seen Sabathia pitch even once this season. And I don't mean on Sports Center.

Several times. Next question?

FROM: Chuck

No-no is a stupid expression. Before ESPN had to rename everything to be cute, the universally accepted term was no-hitter. No-no comes from no hits, no runs. Ervin Santana gave up a run. He pitched a no-hitter. Pass that on to your headline writer.

Done. And good take on ESPN and cute.

Likes: Atlanta's Dan Uggla and the streak. Hope it keeps going, in case you hadn't read. ... The Braves retiring legendary manager Bobby Cox's No. 6 tonight. It was terrific seeing him in Cooperstown at the Hall of Fame induction last month. ... What a fun week with the Tigers and Cleveland and the Brewers at Cardinals. Good stuff and a great glimpse of September. ... The turnaround of the Arizona Diamondbacks. ... The Iowa straw poll this weekend. ... My Weber grill. ... Late-summer blueberries. In pancakes, on cereal, in cobbler, topping vanilla ice cream. One of life's greatest treats. ... The new one from Fountains of Wayne, Sky Full of Holes. Good stuff.

Dislikes: Seeing all the back to school sales already. No, no, no! Can't be that time already, can it?

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Every day's so caffeinated
"I wish they were Golden Gated
"Fillmore couldn't feel more miles away
"So, wrap me up 'Return to sender'
"Let's forget this five-year bender
"Take me to my city by the Bay
"I never knew all that I had
"Now Alcatraz don't sound so bad
"At least they'd have a hella fine Merlot
"If I could wish upon a star
"I would hitch a cable car
"To the one place that I'll always call my home"

-- Train, Save Me, San Francisco
Posted on: March 14, 2010 12:22 am
 

Ian Kennedy's new start in the desert

TUCSON, Ariz. -- Go ahead, let Joba Chamberlain and Phil Hughes write another chapter in their endless "Will he start or will he relieve?" saga this spring.

From his perch in the desert, right-hander Ian Kennedy is perfectly content to have left the No. 4 train to the Bronx behind.

He's making his pitch toward the Arizona Diamondbacks' rotation and, though they're not handing him the job, they are giving him what might be the most important guarantee he could get: They view him as a starter, period. The bullpen is not an option.

"We'd like him to win the job," manager A.J. Hinch says. "We feel like he's going to win the job."

As Hinch says, they're not handing out jobs. Kennedy must earn his keep. But you get the idea. ...

"It's nice, because when I was with the Yankees, I didn't know this spring if I was going to relieve or start, what my role was," Kennedy says. "If they wanted me to start in Triple-A. ...

"Coming here, they said, 'Here's what you could have. You've got to just do what you do.' That's the advantage of being here. If you look around, there's a lot of good, young players here. That's what I'm excited about."

Having missed most of '09 with an aneurysm near his right shoulder, Kennedy is doing his normal spring work and feeling good. The Diamondbacks' rotation is somewhat in flux because of ace Brandon Webb's slow return from shoulder surgery.

Kennedy figured to line up as the No. 4 starter behind Webb, Dan Haren and Edwin Jackson -- though with Webb expected to start on the disabled list, Kennedy could find himself pitching the third game of the season against San Diego.

He's spent a lot of time with Webb this spring which, among other things, has resulted in Kennedy adding a sinker to his repertoire. That first came up during the Arizona Fall League.

"I talk to Webby a lot," Kennedy says. "He's usually in the training room, and I've asked him a lot of questions so far about pitching, trying to pick his brain on how he can throw that great of a two-seamer [sinking fastball]."

Sunblock Day? Finally, some sun and some 70-degree weather. And don't look now, but they're predicting highs of 83 and 84 Tuesday and Wednesday in Phoenix.

Likes: Diamondbacks bench coach Kirk Gibson and former major leaguer Brett Butler, now managing at Triple-A Reno, giving hands-on lessons on baserunning the other day on one of the back fields. I hope the younger Diamondbacks in particular were listening, there's a lot of wisdom to be learned from those two men. ... The Rooster Cogburn Ostrich Ranch off of I-10 on the way south to Tucson. Never fails to amuse. And no, I didn't stop and pet the deer (one of the options listed in the extravagant signage). ... Picacho Peak, between Casa Grande and Tucson off of I-10. My friend Steve Gilbert of MLB.com informed me that the westernmost battle of the Civil War was waged there. It's now a state park, and there's a re-enactment of the battle each year. ... Watching the Big East title game Saturday night on television, great scene at the end after West Virginia won and they blasted John Denver's Take Me Home, Country Roads over the speaker system in Madison Square Garden with the Mountaineer fans singing loudly, especially to the lines in which Denver sings, "To the place, I belong, West Virginia. ..." Sounded great on television.

Dislikes: So I hear there's going to be a "big announcement" on a Detroit radio station Friday night from Alto Reed, saxophone player for Bob Seger. A summer tour, perhaps? How cool would that be? Uh, no. The announcement, according to the crack Web site Segerfile.com, is that the sax guy will be joining the radio station's on-air staff. Yawn.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"It's funny how it's the little things in life that mean the most
"Not where you live, what you drive or the price tag on your clothes
"There`s no dollar sign on a piece of mind, this I`ve come to know
"So if you agree have a drink with me
"Raise your glasses for a toast
"To a little bit of chicken fried
"Cold beer on a Friday night
"A pair of jeans that fit just right
"And the radio up"

-- Zac Brown Band, Chicken Fried

Posted on: December 10, 2009 6:06 pm
 

Slow meetings, price of pitching and more

INDIANAPOLIS -- As baseball executives made like Indy 500 cars and sped toward the airport around midday Thursday -- braving freezing temperatures, a biting wind and ice-covered trees along the way -- the one clear thing that emerged from a mostly slow-paced winter meetings was predictable:

The best hedge against an economy that is squeezing many is if you making your living pitching a baseball.

When Brad Penny, 31 and released by the Red Sox last summer before he hooked on with San Francisco, signed a one-year deal for a $7.5 million base salary plus another $1.5 million in incentives with St. Louis, it raised more than a few eyebrows.

When Randy Wolf, 33 and having missed time with both shoulder and elbow injuries during the past four years, signed a whopping three-year, $29.75 million deal with Milwaukee, it practically raised the roof of the Indianapolis Marriott.

And when Rich Harden, who seems to be stricken with some type of injury every 100 pitches, signed a one-year deal for $6.5 million with Texas ... well, let's just say that ought to scotch any collusion accusations from owners.

"In all honesty, we came into this thing without expecting to be a player for starting pitching," Astros general manager Ed Wade said. "We were prepared to pay significant money for Randy Wolf a year ago, but because of the economy we had to back out.

"Guys at the top of the market are going to get their money."

Indeed. In the case of Wolf, three years is what it took to get him. The Mets were one of the teams offering two years.

"With Penny, [new Houston manager and former Boston bench coach] Brad Mills said that just before he was released by Boston, he started to get his arm strength back," Wade said. "He showed he was healthy in San Francisco.

"On a one-year deal, it makes sense. If there's a bounce back, it can be a big bounce back."

-- Still, more teams than not left Indianapolis with long to-do lists, without having accomplished much of what they need to before spring training  draws too much closer. A large part of the reason is because the deadline for a club to tender contracts to its arbitration-eligible players -- Saturday -- comes after the winter meetings. Probably somewhere close to 100 or more free agents will flood the market after that. "From the GM's point of view, we all wish more trades were made," Cubs GM Jim Hendry said. "It was slower than we all anticipated. There are so many free agents, and there will be more after Saturday. If you can come to a deal with a player without giving up prospects, then that's the way to go."

-- You've heard of "location, location, location" in the real estate business, but it was a key to getting the three-way trade between Detroit, the Yankees and Arizona done this week, too. Diamondbacks' GM Josh Byrnes was able to drive over and see Ian Kennedy pitch in the Arizona Fall League this fall, and his first-hand scouting of Kennedy helped move along the discussions.

-- One other thought on the three-way deal: Several baseball people wondered in the aftermath of the deal whether Arizona knows something about the two young pitchers it sent to Detroit, Max Scherzer and Daniel Schlerer, like whether they're injured.  One scout who saw each toward the end of the year said he doesn't think that's an issue, but did say he thinks each is a long-term health risk given the way they pitch with maximum effort and given each's body type. OK, fine. But remember, people have been saying that for the past few years about a guy in San Francisco, fella named Tim Lincecum.

-- Atlanta left with an excess of starting pitching and still hoping it can acquire a middle of the lineup bat. The Braves will continue to field inquiries about starters Javier Vazquez and Derek Lowe, and they probably will have to absorb some of either's contract to get a deal done. Vazquez, the more likely of the two to be traded, is owed $11.5 million in 2010, Lowe is due $45 million over the next three years.

-- Seattle GM Jack Zduriencik on the Mariners' talks with free agent slugger Jason Bay. "We've left our options open to acquire more talent. There are several ways we could go about that."

-- Zduriencik on Seattle's winter so far: "We're very satisfied, certainly, with signing Chone Figgins. We restructured Jack Wilson's contract, locked him up for the next two years. We brought Ken Griffey Jr. back. As we sit here today, we have three pieces that are very important to next year's club. We still have flexibility with Figgins [who can play third base, second or left field}. We needed a guy like Chone. We targeted him from the get-go."

-- Most likely trade partner with Toronto for Roy Halladay remains the Los Angeles Angels. Philadelphia was said to be talking with Toronto, but Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro said Thursday "there's nothing likely" regarding a trade with the Blue Jays. If the Angels would include shortstop Erick Aybar -- doubtful -- that would be key to getting a deal done.

-- If the Angels can't reach an agreement for an extension with Halladay -- who has one year and $16 million remaining on his contract -- then they would accordingly reduce the level of the package of players they ship to Toronto.

-- The Phillies were in trade talks with Atlanta for Rafael Soriano "pretty deep", according to Amaro, before Tampa Bay acquired the reliever.

-- The Mets made offers to two free agents, outfielder Jason Bay and catcher Bengie Molina, just before departing the meetings Thursday, sources close to the team said.

-- One NL executive's prediction as he wheeled his suitcase through the Marriott lobby Thursday: Jason Bay winds up signing with Seattle and Matt Holliday with Boston.

-- The Cubs, in the market for a center fielder, very well could wind up signing one of two free agents, either Mike Cameron or Marlon Byrd. Cameron played for manager Lou Piniella in Seattle. "As a player and a person, I have the utmost respect for him, there's no question," Piniella said. "I had him in Seattle and got along with him very well. He's a guy that, he can play. He likes to play."

 

Posted on: February 15, 2009 5:06 pm
 

Where have you gone, Phil Hughes?

TAMPA, Fla. -- His locker is just a couple down from heavyweights CC Sabathia and Joba Chamberlain in the New York Yankees' spring clubhouse here, yet he comes and goes with barely a notice.

Last spring, right-hander Phil Hughes was one of the most highly touted prospects in baseball.

Now, with an injury practically being the only thing that could knock Sabathia, A.J. Burnett, Chien-Ming Wang, Andy Pettitte and Chamberlain from the rotation, Hughes is something else.

An apparition.

"Last spring, Ian (Kennedy) and I had a lot of pressure to step in. It's different this year," said Hughes in what may be as big an understatement as you'll hear all spring. "I look at it as a positive. We have three or four guys in our rotation who would be capable of being in the top of any rotation in baseball.

"Whether I fit into it now or toward the end of the year, I'll try and contribute wherever I'm needed."

Maybe it's better this way. Hughes, still only 22, was catapulted into the limelight last winter when the Yankees decided to follow Boston's lead (Jon Lester, Clay Buchholz, Jonathan Papelbon) and emphasize its young pitching. Then Hughes became The Next Can't Miss Kid when the Yanks refused to include him in a deal with Minnesota for Johan Santana, who eventually was traded to the New York Mets.

Ultimately, Hughes not only failed to achieve liftoff in 2008, he mostly looked unsure of himself and completely overmatched in going 0-4 with a 6.62 ERA in eight starts before minor-league assignments and a broken rib sidetracked the rest of what was supposed to be his coming-out party.

Instead, he found himself pitching in obscurity in the Arizona Fall League in October as the Yankees were sitting out the playoffs for the first time since 1993.

Meanwhile, Kennedy went 0-4 with an 8.17 ERA and managed to pitch himself further out of New York's plans than did Hughes.

"I thought it was important that they learned from last year," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. "That they took something from it, and that they understand what it takes to stay here."

Girardi said that each needs to understand "how to attack the (strike) zone" and locate his fastball.

One of the few openings the club is expected to have probably will be for a long reliever who can double as a spot starter, and Girardi made it clear that while Hughes possibly could fill that void, he would be concerned that it could slow the kid's development. Most likely, the long reliever/spot starter job is what the Yankees brought in guys like Brett Tomko for.

Also, Hughes has suffered a string of injuries, which adds to the evidence of those wondering whether he's star-crossed. In addition to the rib, he's suffered hamstring and ankle injuries in the past two years.

Mostly, the Yankees think that Hughes and Kennedy simply need to pitch, that the more innings they rack up, the more steadily they will develop. However, after sitting out October last year, the difference this year, what with moving into the new stadium in April and signing Sabathia and Burnett, is that the Yanks no longer are willing to allow them to learn on the job.

Hughes thinks he is back on track after fighting his mechanics for most of '08.

"My mechanics ideally should stay the same on every pitch," he said, meaning fastball, curve, whatever the selection. "That happens when I slow things down and get a good balance point."

He never could slow things down in his on-the-job audition with the Yankees in '08.

He says he was able to slow them down in Arizona, and his first bullpen session of the spring went well -- in his estimation -- on Sunday.

"In the past, I was rushing through my balance point," Hughes said. "When I'm deliberate in my delivery, I get a good balance point. And everything comes from that."

Likes: Brian Cashman's honesty. Whatever you think of the Yankees, love 'em or hate 'em, the general manager is a stand-up guy. Answering Alex Rodriguez questions the other day, he said that the organization had to run toward the A-Rod situation, not run away from it. True enough. But I especially chuckled over his assessment of this year's Yankees in Tyler Kepner's piece in Sunday's New York Times: "We are a bad defensive team, so a guy that prevents the ball from being put into play is a good thing for us." He was referring to A.J. Burnett ranking third in strikeouts per nine innings among pitchers who worked 500 or more innings last year, and CC Sabathia ranking seventh. Everybody knows that Yankees aren't exactly overloaded with Gold Glovers -- not with Johnny Damon in the outfield, range-challenged Derek Jeter at shortstop, Robinson Cano at second, etc. But for a GM to come right out and say "we are a bad defensive team" ... priceless.

Sunblock day? Barely. Warm, a little humid, but not much sun on a mis-named Sunday.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Ring the bells that still can ring
"Forget your perfect offering
"There is a crack, a crack in everything
"That's how the light gets in."

-- Leonard Cohen, Anthem

 

Posted on: February 15, 2009 5:02 pm
 

Where have you gone, Phil Hughes?

TAMPA, Fla. -- His locker is just a couple down from heavyweights CC Sabathia and Joba Chamberlain in the New York Yankees' spring clubhouse here, yet he comes and goes with barely a notice.

Last spring, right-hander Phil Hughes was one of the most highly touted prospects in baseball.

Now, with an injury practically being the only thing that could knock Sabathia, A.J. Burnett, Chien-Ming Wang, Andy Pettitte and Chamberlain from the rotation, Hughes is something else.

An apparition.

"Last spring, Ian (Kennedy) and I had a lot of pressure to step in. It's different this year," said Hughes in what may be as big an understatement as you'll hear all spring. "I look at it as a positive. We have three or four guys in our rotation who would be capable of being in the top of any rotation in baseball.

"Whether I fit into it now or toward the end of the year, I'll try and contribute wherever I'm needed."

Maybe it's better this way. Hughes, still only 22, was catapulted into the limelight last winter when the Yankees decided to follow Boston's lead (Jon Lester, Clay Buchholz, Jonathan Papelbon) and emphasize its young pitching. Then Hughes became The Next Can't Miss Kid when the Yanks refused to include him in a deal with Minnesota for Johan Santana, who eventually was traded to the New York Mets.

Ultimately, Hughes not only failed to achieve liftoff in 2008, he mostly looked unsure of himself and completely overmatched in going 0-4 with a 6.62 ERA in eight starts before minor-league assignments and a broken rib sidetracked the rest of what was supposed to be his coming-out party.

Instead, he found himself pitching in obscurity in the Arizona Fall League in October as the Yankees were sitting out the playoffs for the first time since 1993.

Meanwhile, Kennedy went 0-4 with an 8.17 ERA and managed to pitch himself further out of New York's plans than did Hughes.

"I thought it was important that they learned from last year," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. "That they took something from it, and that they understand what it takes to stay here."

Girardi said that each needs to understand "how to attack the (strike) zone" and locate his fastball.

One of the few openings the club is expected to have probably will be for a long reliever who can double as a spot starter, and Girardi made it clear that while Hughes possibly could fill that void, he would be concerned that it could slow the kid's development. Most likely, the long reliever/spot starter job is what the Yankees brought in guys like Brett Tomko for.

Also, Hughes has suffered a string of injuries, which adds to the evidence of those wondering whether he's star-crossed. In addition to the rib, he's suffered hamstring and ankle injuries in the past two years.

Mostly, the Yankees think that Hughes and Kennedy simply need to pitch, that the more innings they rack up, the more steadily they will develop. However, after sitting out October last year, the difference this year, what with moving into the new stadium in April and signing Sabathia and Burnett, is that the Yanks no longer are willing to allow them to learn on the job.

Hughes thinks he is back on track after fighting his mechanics for most of '08.

"My mechanics ideally should stay the same on every pitch," he said, meaning fastball, curve, whatever the selection. "That happens when I slow things down and get a good balance point."

He never could slow things down in his on-the-job audition with the Yankees in '08.

He says he was able to slow them down in Arizona, and his first bullpen session of the spring went well -- in his estimation -- on Sunday.

"In the past, I was rushing through my balance point," Hughes said. "When I'm deliberate in my delivery, I get a good balance point. And everything comes from that."

Likes: Brian Cashman's honesty. Whatever you think of the Yankees, love 'em or hate 'em, the general manager is a stand-up guy. Answering Alex Rodriguez questions the other day, he said that the organization had to run toward the A-Rod situation, not run away from it. True enough. But I especially chuckled over his assessment of this year's Yankees in Tyler Kepner's piece in Sunday's New York Times: "We are a bad defensive team, so a guy that prevents the ball from being put into play is a good thing for us." He was referring to A.J. Burnett ranking third in strikeouts per nine innings among pitchers who worked 500 or more innings last year, and CC Sabathia ranking seventh. Everybody knows that Yankees aren't exactly overloaded with Gold Glovers -- not with Johnny Damon in the outfield, range-challenged Derek Jeter at shortstop, Robinson Cano at second, etc. But for a GM to come right out and say "we are a bad defensive team" ... priceless.

Sunblock day? Barely. Warm, a little humid, but not much sun on a mis-named Sunday.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Ring the bells that still can ring
"Forget your perfect offering
"There is a crack, a crack in everything
"That's how the light gets in."

-- Leonard Cohen, Anthem

 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com