Tag:Rafael Palmeiro
Posted on: January 9, 2012 7:13 pm
Edited on: January 9, 2012 7:19 pm
 

Riffs from the Hall of Fame voting

The 2012 Hall of Fame election -- by the numbers, and with the skinny. ...

Elected

Barry Larkin, 495 votes, 86.4 percent: Many numbers tell the tale, such as Larkin becoming the first 30/30 (homers/steals) shortstop in history. But how about in 1988, when he led the majors with only 24 strikeouts in 588 at-bats?

Maybe next year (or the year after)

Jack Morris, 382 votes, 66.7 percent: Great chance next year (which will cause massive coronaries in Sabermetric community), but he could run smack into wall via overloaded ballot that includes Roger Clemens, Curt Schilling, Barry Bonds and Sammy Sosa.

Jeff Bagwell, 321 votes, 56 percent: Start forging plaque after big jump from 41.7 percent last year.

In need of GPS

Lee Smith, 290 votes, 50.6 percent: A decade on the ballot and it's like he's trapped in a Republican debate. No traction.

Tim Raines, 279 votes, 48.7 percent: Criminally unsupported for guy who ranks second all-time in stolen base percentage (300 minimum attepts), though up 11 percentage points over last year.

Edgar Martinez, 209 votes, 36.5 percent: Fighting the designated hitter uphill battle. If you don't have 3,000 hits, it helps to have worn a glove at some point during your career.

Alan Trammell, 211 votes, 36.8 percent: Heading in the right direction after 24.3 percent last year, but still undeservedly playing the "bye" to the voters' "good."

Fred McGriff, 137 votes, 23.9 percent: CSI investigators -- or are those PETA reps? -- checking for pulse as Crime Dog's 493 career homers get no love.

Larry Walker, 131 votes, 22.9 percent: Even the Canadian exchange rate doesn't favor Cooperstown.

Mark McGwire, 112 votes, 19.5 percent: Big Mac Fan Club not allowing new members. Remarkably consistent from last year's 115 votes, 19.8 percent.

Don Mattingly, 102 votes, 17.8 percent: Just three more years left on the ballot. Hope Donnie Baseball's managerial stint with Dodgers outlasts that.

Dale Murphy, 83 votes, 14.5 percent: A Hall of Fame man, and even if he can't be in Cooperstown, I hope baseball somehow involves him more.

Rafael Palmeiro, 72 votes, 12.6 percent: Did this guy or his career really exist? Outside of wagging a finger at Congress, I mean?

Bernie Williams, 55 votes, 9.6: To those who support Bernie and Jorge Posada: How about we just put every Yankee who played between, say, 1996 and 2001, into the Hall?

No soup -- or future ballots -- for you

Juan Gonzalez, 23 votes, 4 percent: The Rangers had a homecoming ... and no Hall of Fame supporters showed up for Juan-Gone.

Vinny Castilla, 6 votes, 1 percent: Six votes?!?! Vinny had one Hall of Fame moment. That came near the end of his career when he walked into the stadium past me as I was arguing with a security guard who wasn't buying my press pass, stopped, grinned, then approached me in the clubhouse wanting the scoop ... and complimenting me for getting in the guy's face so spiritedly.

Tim Salmon, 5 votes, 0.9 percent: Not Cooperstown worthy, but easily could join Dale Murphy in the all-time good guys' Hall.

Bill Mueller, 4 votes, 0.5 percent: The guy won a batting title (AL, 2003), but I think somebody mis-read Mueller's moving receipts for Hall votes.

Brad Radke, 2 votes, 0.3 percent: I'm assuming the two who voted for Bad Brad are refugees who watched him, incredibly, win 12 consecutive starts while going 20-10 for an absolutely miserable Twins team in 1997.

Javy Lopez, 1 vote, 0.2 percent: Had the Braves allowed him to catch on nights when Greg Maddux started, he may have earned two votes.

Eric Young, 1 vote, 0.2 percent: Very cool. Had no idea Eric Young's mother was in the Baseball Writers' Assn. of America.

Jeromy Burnitz, 0 votes: Yeah, but he'll always have that starting berth for the NL in the 1999 All-Star Game in Boston on his resume.

Brian Jordan, 0 votes: Coincidentally, no votes for the NFL Hall of Fame, either.

Terry Mulholland, 0 votes: No votes, but gets points for being part-owner of the Dirty Dogg Saloon in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Phil Nevin, 0 votes: On the other hand, his managerial career (Triple-A Toledo Mud Hens) is taking off.

Ruben Sierra, 0 votes: Whatever happened to the Village Idiot?

Tony Womack, 0 votes: The New York precinct refused to consider him following that game-tying, Game 7 double against Mariano Rivera to set up Luis Gonzalez's game-winner in the 2001 World Series.
Posted on: May 8, 2009 5:00 pm
 

Stories they could (and do) tell

Of course Manny Ramirez blames a doctor in Florida for prescribing him bad stuff for "a personal health issue."

Of course the doctor "gave me a medication, not a steroid, which he thought was OK to give me," Manny said in his statement.

Of course. Rare is the player who violates baseball's drug prevention program testing, or is shoulder-deep in circumstantial evidence, and is actually guilty.

Let's review:

Alex Rodriguez: Said his cousin in Florida got some stuff for him. "I didn't think they were steroids. Again, that's part of being young and stupid."

Paul Byrd: The pitcher, then working for Cleveland in the 2007 American League Championship Series, said he began taking Human Growth Hormone as part of treatment for a tumor on his pituitary gland. Said he took it under medical supervision. Later reports alleged that Byrd actually began taking HGH before any pituitary gland tumor was found and that one of the medical "professionals" to have prescribed Byrd's stash was a Florida dentist whose dental license had been suspended for fraud and incompetence. Don't know if that Florida dentist knows Manny's Florida doctor.

(I don't know whether Byrd's Florida dentist knows Manny's Florida doctor. Or whether the dentist and the doctor know A-Rod's Florida cousin. I do know this is all sounds like something hatched in a Carl Hiaasen novel.)

Rafael Palmeiro: "I did not do this intentionally or knowingly." He said he thought he was getting vitamin B-12 from then-teammate Miguel Tejada.

Alex Sanchez: The first major-leaguer suspended, back in 2004, under the drug policy. "I take stuff I buy over the counter," he said. "Multivitamins, protein shakes, muscle relaxants. That kind of stuff."

Barry Bonds: The Cream? The Clear? Bonds said he thought it was flaxseed oil.

Roger Clemens: Hey man, it was Vitamin B-12. And the injections were Lidocaine.

Sergio Mitre: Former Cubs pitcher suspended in January after taking banned substance "unwittingly" that was purchased from a legal supplement at a GNC store.

Mike Cameron: Tested positive for a banned stimulant twice. "I can only conclude that a nutritional supplement I was taking was tainted."

J.C. Romero: Phillies reliever has filed suit against nutritional supplement manufacturer alleging an unlisted ingredient in one of its products caused him to test positive for a substance banned by Major League Baseball.

Likes: Former pitcher Rob Dibble on SIRIUS XM satellite radio Thursday: "I almost believe that you should get a lifetime ban for idiocy because it's just so ridiculous that you could think 'I'm above it all, I'm Manny Ramirez, I'm Alex Rodriguez, I'm Rafael Palmeiro, I'm Roger Clemens.' How many more guys do I have to name before we run out of heroes and superstar players in the major leagues that you actually believe aren't doing this stuff?" ... And this from Dibble on SIRIUS XM: "To me, it's an embarrassment for all of these guys, more so for the people that didn't cheat and the guys that played, 20, 30, 40 years ago, including people like Roberto Clemente or Jackie Robinson or Willie Mays. Can you imagine these older gentlemen sitting at home and hearing about this?" ... Dontrelle Willis to start for Detroit at Minnesota on Wednesday. ... State of Play. Entertaining movie, though a little schmaltzy in places with the repartee between the Russell Crowe reporter character and the Rachel McAdams blogger character. ... KLOS, the venerable rock radio station in Los Angeles (95.5 on your dial). Good stuff.

Dislikes: Bob Melvin is a good man. Arizona's problems run way deeper than him. But it's right there in the manager's handbook: One day, you must go.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Where have you gone Joe DiMaggio?
"A nation turns its lonely eyes to you
"What's that you say, Mrs. Robinson?
"Joltin' Joe has left and gone away"

-- Simon and Garfunkel, Mrs. Robinson

 
 
 
 
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