Tag:Bud Black
Posted on: July 19, 2010 9:25 pm
 

Padres look to get Black pitching, hitting help

The NL West-leading Padres are on the move. They extended manager Bud Black's contract through 2013 on Monday -- with club options for 2014 and 2015 -- and general manager Jed Hoyer is talking about adding both a hitter and a pitcher by the July 31 non-waivers trade deadline.

"We'll try to accomplish both and see if we can," Hoyer said of the dual hitter-pitcher option for a club that opened the 2010 season with the second-lowest payroll in the majors after Pittsburgh.

Hoyer told CBSSports.com that he's eying a starting pitcher because the club wants to protect three young starters who have pitched limited major-league innings -- Mat Latos, Clayton Richard and Wade LeBlanc -- from overextending themselves.

He added that he would like to add a hitter to help "lengthen" a lineup that currently ranks 12th in runs scored in the National League, and 14th in slugging percentage.

One such hitter whom Hoyer did not name is Milwaukee's Corey Hart, who just so happened to share a National League clubhouse with Padres manager Bud Black at last week's All-Star Game.

Asked the other day if he did any reconnaissance work, Black smiled.

"He had a little bit of time, and I was in the clubhouse," Black said of a between-rounds moment while Hart was jacking baseball's out of Angel Stadium during last Monday's Home Run Derby. "I said, 'Nice round.' And he goes, 'Thanks.' And that was that."

Well, almost.

"I did mention, 'Hey, a lot of those balls would have gone out of Petco,'" Black said, smiling. "I did say that to gauge his response."

Hart's response?

"He kept looking at the TV and said, 'Yeah, they would have,'" Black said, still grinning. "I gauged his reaction to see if he would say, 'Yeah, I know man, let's go.'

"I didn't get that. I was making sure that he knows we're watching."

Likes: What a great story the Chicago White Sox are. ... A total of 14 games left between the White Sox and Tigers beginning on Aug. 3. ... Rocco Baldelli back in Tampa Bay's system. ... This recent piece from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Mario Mendoza, he of the Mendoza Line. ... Finally saw the last two episodes of Treme, the excellent HBO show. Have not heard anything about it recently. Hope they renew it for a second season. ... Looking forward to TBS re-running the George Steinbrenner episodes of Seinfeld all week. ... Love American Slang, the new Gaslight Anthem disc. ... About time Friday Night Lights got some Emmy love.

Dislikes: Scott Rolen out with a hamstring injury. This is a very key point in Cincinnati's season. ... Minnesota's Justin Morneau out for another week with that concussion. Those are nothing to mess with, and you never know how bad they are. Here's to a speedy recovery. ... I've seen worse than Everybody's Fine, the Robert DeNiro flick we watched via Netflix the other night. But the writers went way overboard with piling on the stuff from his ingrate kids. The ending came around and fixed that some, but still, a disappointment.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"And in the end
"The love you take
"Is equal to the love
"You make"

-- The Beatles, The End

 

Posted on: July 12, 2010 8:28 pm
Edited on: July 12, 2010 8:32 pm
 

Will young power arms finally shift tide to NL?

ANAHEIM, Calif. -- How long has it been since the National League has won a freakin' All-Star Game?

Let's just say this: Last time the NL won, 1996 in Philadelphia, Bob Dole was running for president.

It's weird, it's bizarre, it's ugly and it's a subject the National Leaguers get tired of answering. Current count: The AL's unbeaten streak has reached 13 years, including winning the past seven in a row (since the humiliating 2002 tie in Milwaukee).

Yet silly as this sounds, there is a very real sense that the tide might be beginning to shift away from Junior Circuit dominance in the Mid-Summer Classic.

Reasons?

Colorado's Ubaldo Jimenez. Florida's Josh Johnson. San Francisco's Tim Lincecum. Milwaukee's Yovani Gallardo. All All-Stars this year. And, Washington's Stephen Strasburg, and San Diego's Mat Latos, who very well could debut as All-Stars next summer when the game hits Phoenix.

You know about Strasburg. And Latos was the next pitcher NL manager Charlie Manuel would have chosen in the event of one more injury scratch.

"It needs to turn for us, the way it's been going," says San Diego manager Bud Black, a coach on Manuel's NL staff this week. "There are some fine young power arms in the National League.

"Hey, the American League's no slouch either, with David Price and CC Sabathia. And Felix Hernandez can probably throw it as hard as he wants to."

No question. But there is more sizzle in the NL's pitching this summer -- especially given all the incredibly talented young arms -- than there has been in quite some time.

"Just looking at our staff, I know I wouldn't want to be a hitter on the other side," says Mets third baseman David Wright, who has been in the NL clubhouse for the past four losses. "We have some power arms, really, top to bottom. Just seeing their age and the ability and the upside and what they've accomplished already is amazing.

"I know how I feel with a bat in my hands in the box against these guys. Then when you string together the depth that the NL has with their young power arms, it's pretty impressive."

Jimenez comes into the game with 15 wins, a no-hitter against Atlanta this year and a 33-inning scoreless streak compiled during one especially torrid stretch in May and June.

Johnson leads the majors with a 1.70 ERA and has allowed no more than one earned run in 10 of his past 11 starts.

Lincecum has won back-to-back Cy Young awards, Strasburg is showing signs of having Cy Young stuff ... the list goes on.

"I know you've got Strasburg, Jimenez, Josh Johnson ... those guys throw hard," Angels outfielder Torii Hunter says. "They're filthy. I've been watching them on television."

In the NL, Wright has been watching most of them from the batter's box.

"You know that it's going to be a rough day when you're battling to draw a walk," Wright says. "Or you're battling to plate one guy and you know you have to be perfect as far as situational hitting just to plate a run, that you're not going to have that big inning where you can put up some crooked numbers.

"Where you have to battle and grind and fight and almost hope that the other team makes a mistake. You know what an uncomfortable at-bat it is. You know what they're capable of doing."

Add Philadelphia's veteran ace Roy Halladay, who will pitch for the NL for the first time following six All-Star appearances for the AL, and Atlanta's cagey Tim Hudson, who is making his NL debut Tuesday following Tommy John ligament transfer surgery (and two All-Star selections when he was pitching in the AL), and it's not an easy staff to face.

As for Jimenez and Johnson, the NL's two most dominant pitchers in the first half and the ones many AL hitters will see for the first time on Tuesday night, well, Wright says his least favorite to face is. ...

"Neither. We've been fortunate in that we've missed Josh Johnson the last few times we've played the Marlins, but it's no fun having him in the division.

"When you go in for a series in Miami, you always know which day Josh is pitching. You know you'd better win the game before that or the game after that or the other games because you're likely not going to win that one."

Whether the same will hold true for the All-Star Game, well ... it's got to turn one of these years, doesn't it?

Posted on: May 2, 2010 8:46 pm
Edited on: May 2, 2010 8:51 pm
 

Padres putting on pitching clinic

SAN DIEGO -- Along with the Mets, the Padres are one of only two National League teams to never have thrown a no-hitter. But where San Diego's pitching is concerned, the Padres on Sunday did touch history by throwing a third shutout against Milwaukee in four games.

Never before had the Padres thrown three shutouts in a series of any length. And leaving the Brewers' batters even more bewildered, the two runs the stingy San Diego pitchers allowed were the fewest in Padres' history in a four-game series.

This against a Brewers team that arrived here last Thursday leading the National League in runs scored.

So much for the gap left in the rotation by trading ace Jake Peavy to the White Sox last July.

So much for the continued absence of All-Star Chris Young, who has been on the disabled list since the season's first week.

"You talk all the time about pitching and solid defense and timely hitting going a long way," Padres manager Bud Black said after Sunday's 8-0 whitewashing of Milwaukee. "You can't discount what our starters have done early this season.

"To a man, they've all pitched well."

Sunday's winner was the graybeard of the group Jon Garland, a 10-year veteran. Kevin Correia, Clayton Richard, Wade LeBlanc and Mat Latos also have pitched so well that the discussion in San Diego recently has centered on just whom the Padres would send back to Triple-A when Young is ready to rejoin them.

Mix in the bullpen, where set-up men Luke Gregerson and Mike Adams in particular have been nails for closer Heath Bell, and the surprising first-place Padres have won 13 of their past 16 games.

"You see our bullpen," Padres catcher Yorvit Torrealba said. "There are not a lot of guys people have heard of before. But if our starting pitching gets us a lead after seven innings, it's game over. Gregerson, Mike Adams ... guys nobody's heard of before, but they have outstanding arms.

"Our pitching is really deep."

"They're good," said slow-starting Brewers first baseman Prince Fielder (.234, two homers, nine RBI in 25 games). "They did a great job this series.

"Unfortunately, we probably weren't at our best."

Overall, the Padres now own a major-league leading six shutouts. Though five of them have come at Petco Park (the other came in Cincinnati), that's two more than the Mets and San Francisco and double the number of any AL team.

Coming into Sunday's games, the Padres' 2.88 ERA ranked third in the majors (behind the Cardinals and Giants), as did their .233 opponents' batting average.

"The fact that we held them to zero runs in three of four games and to two runs total in four games, we feel like we came away with a sweep," Padres outfielder Tony Gwynn Jr. said. "That's a very, very talented offense over there. Our pitchers really stepped up."

Heading into Monday's series opener against Colorado and Rockies ace Ubaldo Jimenez, Padres pitchers now have worked 40 scoreless innings in their past 42 innings pitched going back to Wednesday's game in Florida.

Over their past 16 games, the Padres own a 2.08 ERA.

Posted on: August 6, 2009 10:38 pm
Edited on: August 7, 2009 1:05 am
 

Padres extend manager Black's contract

In a season of upheaval, one thing will remain the same on San Diego's baseball field: The Padres have extended the contract of manager Bud Black through 2010 with a club option for 2011.

Black, in his third season of managing the Padres, is presiding over a club with a drastically cut payroll this season that is buried in last place in the NL West. Chopping from $70-some million down to the $40-million range following the trade of Jake Peavy to the Chicago White Sox on Friday, the Padres entered a series-opener with the New York Mets on Thursday night at 44-65.

Padres general manager Kevin Towers and Jeff Moorad, the Padres' new chief executive officer, first discussed extending the manager a couple of months ago, and they first broached an extension with Black several weeks ago.

"Watching the way he dealt with young players, he's done a real nice job," Towers said. "I personally think he's managed better this year than his first two.

"I knew he'd get better with time. Our record doesn't indicate it, but it's not Buddy's fault we're 20 games under .500."

Black, 52, has a career record of 196-238 during his two-plus seasons in charge in San Diego. The Padres went 89-74 in his first season and were eliminated from the postseason chase in a one-game playoff in Colorado on the Monday after the regular season ended.

"The first year was kind of a whirlwind managing a contending club," Towers said. "Last year we had a lot of injuries. I've said I thought Buddy would be better even with a younger club. He likes young players.

"He's been one of the driving forces here, 'Hey, let's get our young guys up here and see what they're capable of.' I think this is more of the team he's wanted. He can steal some bases, hit-and-run. We've had a station-to-station club the last couple of years."

Towers also has been impressed with Black's calm demeanor, especially as the losses have mounted and the roster has blown up.

"I don't know how he's done it," Towers said. "I've never seen Bud Black have a bad day. A more volatile manager can make things even worse. If anything, he's been a breath of fresh air for all of us. I tend to fall on the negative side, and he helps balance me out a little bit."

Black, following San Diego's 8-3 win over the New York Mets on Thursday, said he's excited with the extension and is happy that he'll be in charge as the club looks to turn things around.

"I'm flattered that it was talked about over the last month," Black said. "I'm glad to be a part of what's going on here. There's been a transition with ownership in the spring, and there is an evaluation process that obviously continues to go on. Jeff and Tom (Garfinkel, new club president) are doing some things that are going to get us back to where we belong. And K.T. is a great baseball mind. I like working with him."

Posted on: July 6, 2009 8:17 pm
 

Black, Padres talking extension

While Cleveland general manager Mark Shapiro announced the other day that manager Eric Wedge definitely will be retained through the rest of this season (Wedge is signed through 2010), another manager is close to landing some security of his own.

San Diego and manager Bud Black, whose deal expires after the 2009 season, are having ongoing conversations about a contract extension, and the two sides are hoping to reach an agreement sometime this month. There are still significant details to be worked out, such as length of the extension and salary. But there is desire on both sides to get it done, leading to the current optimism that it will get done.

"They should," veteran outfielder Brian Giles said. "We've got a lot of young guys, and that comes with a lot of growing pains. I think he's done a good job with the team they've put together."

The economically downsizing Padres weren't expected to contend this season. But they've played far better than expected following last year's 101-loss disaster. And handed a roster far more versatile than last summer's slow-footed, non-athletic group, Black has been able to expand his managing chops.

"I've seen him grow as a manager," said Padres closer Heath Bell who, like Black, arrived in San Diego in 2007. "He's gotten a little better with strategy each year. I've seen him do a little more each year."

Bell especially complimented Black's style of privately asking veterans for input at times and keeping them apprised of what he's thinking. Padres management was especially impressed when the normally low-key Black blistered his team following a sloppy, 0-6 trip through Houston and Chicago in May.

Following that, the Padres responded with a season-high 10-game winning streak and won 12 of 15.

"I think it would be good for the organization," if Black is retained, Bell said. "I think it would be pretty positive."

Likes: Eric Wedge mostly is getting killed by Cleveland fans right now. But I will say this: Whether he eventually stays or goes, it is nice to see an organization (and by that, I mean general manager Mark Shapiro, especially) take some of the responsibility for what's gone wrong instead of simply blaming it all on the manager. Fans love to see skippers get the ax, and often it's warranted. But it's rarely that simple. ... Very classy move by the Chicago White Sox in dedicating a memorial at U.S. Cellular Field to the late, legendary baseball writer Jerome Holtzman. The case, in the lobby area of the park, even includes a cigar among the typewriter and assorted other artifacts from the career of Holtzman, who passed away a year ago this month. ... Netflix the two-disc DVD from the old Johnny Cash Show and, if you like music, you will not be disappointed. It's a greatest-hits sort of collection from Cash's old television show that ran in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and among the guests are the Creedence Clearwater Revival (you sure don't get a chance to see them perform every day), a very young Bob Dylan, Louis Armstrong (he seems like he was a very sweet man), a very young James Taylor, Glen Campbell, Kris Kristofferson, Derek and the Dominos, Ray Charles and many, many more. Very enjoyable. And I didn't realize how eclectic that show was back in the day when it came to various musical styles.

Dislikes: Really, really bad news: Sean Penn is out of The Three Stooges movie. Awwww.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"It was 1989, my thoughts were short my hair was long
"Caught somewhere between a boy and man
"She was seventeen and she was far from in-between
"It was summertime in Northern Michigan
"Splashing through the sand bar
"Talking by the campfire
"It's the simple things in life, like when and where
"We didn't have no internet
"But man I never will forget
"The way the moonlight shined upon her hair"

-- Kid Rock, All Summer Long

 

Posted on: May 22, 2008 11:51 pm
 

Let's go to the replay

The manager who had probably the most to gain last October if there had been instant replay likes the idea that baseball is considering ways to implement it -- but only if it's limited in scope.

San Diego's Bud Black, whose Padres lost a crushing one-game playoff in Colorado last Oct. 1 -- they still swear in San Diego that Matt Holliday never touched the plate on that slide home -- gives the idea a cautious yes.

"I think there is some merit to it," Black says. "There's some merit to reviewing boundary plays, absolutely. Balls on the wall, at the foul pole, possibly even balls over the bag.

"I don't know about on the bases quite yet. I think umpiring is a big part of the game. I think the human element is still attractive to this game."

I'm inclined to agree with Black. I've never been in favor of instant replay -- partly because I don't want to see the games slowed down anymore than they already are, and partly because I think the umpires hit on a far higher percentage of calls than they miss.

But the way some of these new ballparks are designed, with outfield walls breaking and jutting at funky angles, it's become extremely difficult to tell a home run from ball off of the wall. And while some umpires maybe don't hustle to get out there for a good look, it's an impossible task: Even the ones who do hustle don't possibly have enough time to get back to the wall for an up-close look.

No way, though, can there be full instant replay, or games will never finish. Can you imagine if every called strike is reviewed?

"Do you argue every play?" Black asks. "Do you throw a flag if you want a review? Do you lose an out if you ask for a review and you're wrong?

"There would have to be some strict structure."

No question.

Likes: Ken Griffey Jr. now at 598 home runs, closing in on becoming only the sixth big leaguer ever to reach the 600 mark. And almost certainly the first since Willie Mays to do it clean. ... Arizona's Doug Davis set to rejoin the Diamondbacks' rotation Friday night following thyroid cancer surgery earlier this season. ... The current GQ article on Journey looking to come back strong with a new lead singer. Leads me to wonder if Steven Perry's final public appearances will have been with the White Sox as they were winning the 2005 World Series to the theme song Don't Stop Believin'. ...

Dislikes: American Airlines now charging $15 for the first bag you check. Every time you step near an airport now, the airlines nickel and dime you. Two bucks for checking a bag curbside. Twenty-five or more bucks if you want to change from a middle seat to an aisle seat on Northwest. Gouge, gouge, gouge. Just like at the gas pump. Every time you wake up anymore, there's more bad economic news.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"There is no pain, you are receding
"A distant ship's smoke on the horizon
"You are only coming through in waves
"Your lips move, but I can't hear what you're sayin'"

-- Pink Floyd, Comfortably Numb

Posted on: April 19, 2008 12:00 am
 

Marathon nights and long memories

Lots of baseball people have long stories.

Few can tell the tales of a 22-inning marathon such as the one Colorado and San Diego played Thursday night/Friday morning in Petco Park.

After 659 pitches, 15 different pitchers and 6 hours and 16 minutes, the Colorado Rockies finally beat the San Diego Padres 2-1.

Then the Rockies flew to Houston for this weekend's series, landed a little after 8 a.m. ... and promptly got stuck in rush hour traffic on the way to check into their hotel.

Funny. Because as word boomeranged throughout baseball of the riveting/ridiculous/incredible goings-on in San Diego, the Seattle Mariners were spending some time in traffic, too.

"We were on the bus (Thursday night) leaving Oakland when we saw the score," Mariners manager John McLaren said, referring to the aftermath of his club's 8-1 victory at Whatever They're Calling the Oakland Coliseum Now. "We picked it back up when we landed here (in Southern California).

"I think it was in the 14th when we left Oakland and in the 20th when we landed."

Fortunately, Colorado manager Clint Hurdle and San Diego skipper Bud Black each were able to avoid being charged with inflicting cruel and unusual punishment Friday when they gave the men who caught the marathon game a night off.

Colorado's Yorvit Torrealba and San Diego's Josh Bard each caught the entire 22-inning affair, something Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia didn't even have to do back when he was playing in 1989 in either of the Dodgers' 22-inning games.

Yep, the Padres and Rockies think they had it rough? How about the Dodgers in '89? They lost in Houston 5-4 in a 22-inning game on June 3, '89 ... then beat Montreal 1-0 in 22 innings on Aug. 23, '89.

"We couldn't score," Scioscia said Friday, cringing at the memory. "We could pitch, we just couldn't score."

Rick Dempsey started behind the plate for the Dodgers in the June 3 game, and Scioscia entered in a sixth-inning double-switch. He played the rest of the way, going 0-for-5 with two walks.

And wanna know something funny? That was on Saturday night. The next day, the Dodgers and Astros played 13 innings -- Scioscia started as the Dodgers catcher, hit a grand slam in the first and played nearly the entire game before being removed in the bottom of the 13th.

In the Aug. 23 game, Scoscia started but left in the eighth inning when Billy Bean pinch-ran for him.

His memories are vague -- he thought the Montreal game went 16 or 17 innings, not 22 -- but Scioscia distinctly remembers that after one of those games, several players remained at the stadium and slept in the clubhouse because they had a day game the next day and had to be back in the park in six or seven hours.

"A game that long, some guys start with sore hamstrings and end up healthy," Scioscia cracked.

Nevertheless, just in case, Torrealba wasn't the only Colorado player who was given the night off in Houston on Friday. First baseman Todd Helton, second baseman Jayson Nix and outfielders Matt Holliday and Brad Hawpe also were awarded a night of rest. In Arizona, the Padres gave second baseman Tadahito Iguchi the night off.

Hurdle, who used eight pitchers -- Kip Wells got the win -- said he was close to using infielder Clint Barmes as his emergency pitcher. Padres manager Bud Black rode Bard behind the plate partly because his other catcher, Colt Morton, had pinch-hit in the 14th. Outfielder Paul McAnulty was Black's emergency catcher -- though the Padres skipper admitted Friday that McAnulty was blissfully unaware of that during Thursday's proceedings.

They staged a seventh-inning stretch at Petco Park in the seventh, 14th and 21st innings. And though they stopped selling beer in the seventh -- as is usually the case -- coffee and ice cream were big sellers late, Padres vice-president Richard Anderson said.

"I think that's the beauty of this game, it's unpredictability," McLaren, the Seattle skipper, said.

While talking about the Padres-Rockies game, McLaren, who grew up near Houston, recalled attending the Astros-New York Mets' 24-inning game on Monday night, April 15, 1968. He was in high school at the time, and you bet he stayed until the bitter end.

"My mom was waiting up for me, and when I got home she said, 'Don't think you're staying home -- you're going to school tomorrow,'" McLaren recalled, chuckling. "She thought we had gone someplace else after the game.

"When I got home from school the next day, she said, 'I should have known you'd stay until the final out.'"

Thursday's game was a record-setter for length, by innings, for both the Colorado and San Diego franchises. Black called it "incredible", adding that "everybody who was here will never forget it."

You would think that would be true.

Yet, Scioscia's memory on those two 22-inning games in 1989 is awfully fuzzy.

And, perhaps, there are those who were so exhausted they might even try to forget it. Detroit shortstop Edgar Renteria played in baseball's last 20-inning game, five years ago, and he even scored the winning run for St. Louis.

Yet, on Friday, as Detroit Tigers beat man Danny Knobler of the Booth (Mich.) Newspaper Group was putting together a note in the aftermath of the Padres-Rockies marathon, Renteria couldn't even recall it.

"I don't remember," Renteria said. "Not at all."

Thirty minutes later, Renteria still couldn't remember it.

"I'm serious, man," he told Knobler apologetically. "I don't remember."

Likes: Late-night baseball. I listened to the Padres' radio broadcast Thursday night, picking it up in about the 11th or 12th inning in my car when the Angels-Royals finished. Listened on radio until about the 15th inning, when I reached my house. Then I watched until the 20th inning on my family room television. Then I took the dog out for a quick walk between innings and caught the final two innings on my bedroom television. Padres broadcasters Ted Leitner and Andy Masur were very entertaining on the car radio and Matt Vasgersian -- one of the game's most underrated television play-by-play men -- and former pitcher Mark Grant were enjoyable as always on the tube. ... Springsteen's Hungry Heart, Fourth of July, Asbury Park (Sandy), Kitty's Back and You're Missing. Specifically, the organ parts.

Dislikes: Sad, sad day. Danny Federici, the E St. Band organist, passed away Thursday after battling melanoma for three years. Here's how you can help the cause, if you wish.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Now the hardness of this world
"Slowly grinds your dreams away
"Makin' a fool's joke
"Out of the promises we make
"And what once seemed black and white
"Turns to so many shades of gray
"We lose ourselves in work to do
"Work to do, and bills to pay
"And it's a ride, ride, ride
"And there ain't much cover
"With no one runnin' by your side
"My blood brother"

-- Bruce Springsteen, Blood Brothers

Posted on: April 6, 2008 7:53 pm
Edited on: April 6, 2008 7:54 pm
 

Dirt, accusations and Jake Peavy's hand

Video killed the radio star, the song goes ... and it may wind up curbing cheating, too. Or, even thinking of it.

Not that San Diego Cy Young winner Jake Peavy was doing anything of the sort in his brillitant, complete-game win over Los Angeles on Saturday, but somebody saw some brown stuff on his right thumb, index and middle fingers on the postgame Fox television broadcast while Peavy was shaking hands with his teammates, posted the zoomed-in photos on the Internet and, voila. Dirt smeared with resin and sweat? Pine tar? Maple syrup left over from breakfast?

The unanimous Cy Young winner found himself answering questions Sunday that probably won't disppear until after his next start.

Which, as fate would have it, is Friday in Dodger Stadium in a rematch against Brad Penny.

Peavy, manager Bud Black and the Padres say the brown stuff on Peavy's hand Saturday was dirt, plain and simple.

"I laugh, to be honest with you," Peavy said. "Anybody that wants to check me, feel free. There's nothing on my hand that's not supposed to be. I laughed. I thought it was funny."

"You play baseball, your hands get dirty," Padres manager Bud Black said, noting that Peavy often reaches for the resin bag and that the powdery substance is designed to make the hand a bit sticky (to grip the ball better) and, when mixed with sweat, said that dirt can adhere to it.

Dodgers manager Joe Torre acknowledged the possibility that it could be pine tar during his pre-game meeting with reporters Sunday but mostly downplayed the situation. Torre said that if somebody appears to be doing something illegal in a game it should be checked but said that he does not favor "undressing" an opposing pitcher -- that is, asking the umpire to go out and search the pitcher on the mound.

"They're more than welcome to," Peavy said of the prospect of the Dodgers asking the umpires to check him Friday night. "I hope they're worried about my hand. Anytime Joe wants to check me, he can."

The Peavy situation is similar to one involving Detroit's Kenny Rogers during the 2006 WOrld Series. Then, however, television cameras picked up on Rogers' dirty hand during the game and broadcasters were openly talking about it as play continued.

Peavy's dirty hand wasn't noticed until after the broadcast, by someone who apparently saw it on digital video, photographed his television and then sent the photos to a Web site.

And the photo came after the game. If Peavy's hand was dirty during the game, there's apparently no evidence.

Peavy saw the photo when someone showed it to him before the game and, during a conversation after San Diego's 3-2 loss to the Dodgers on Sunday, expressed surprise -- and skepticism where the photo was concerned -- that his hand was that stained.

"I can't imagine my hands would be that dirty," Peavy said. "But my hands aren't that clean (during a game). I pick up the resin bag, I hit. ..."

 

 

 

Category: MLB
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com