Tag:Manny Ramirez
Posted on: April 8, 2011 9:15 pm
 

Dodgers have seen Manny's PED suspension before

SAN DIEGO -- The Dodgers have seen this before, Manny Ramirez in the lineup one day and popped with a long suspension for a failed performance-enhancing drug test the next.

Nevertheless, they were sad, disappointed and stunned -- stunned at Friday's news, and surprised that whatever system of checks and balances Manny uses, that he would put himself in a position to get zapped again.

"That's bad," said shortstop Rafael Furcal, a teammate of Manny's from 2008-2010. "Oh my God.

"I promise you, he does not want to retire. I don't know what happened.

"For me, it's sad."

Ramirez abruptly retired Friday, just five games into Tampa Bay's season, rather than face the penalty for a second drug bust: A 100-game suspension.

Throughout the game, people were adjusting their views of what he accomplished during his 19-year career, which now includes becoming the first (and, so far, only) player to get popped twice for failing PED tests.

"A little bit," said Dodgers manager Don Mattingly, Ramirez's hitting coach in Los Angeles from the time he landed on July 31, 2008, until the club allowed the White Sox to take him as a waiver claim last Aug. 30. "It's hard not to wonder what's what.

"You just don't know. That's the hardest part."

Part of not knowing the "what's what" with Ramirez, from the Dodgers' perspective, now includes his torrid run two-month run immediately upon joining the club in '08 during which he pretty much carried the Dodgers into the playoffs.

"I think you look at all guys, when it comes out like that," Mattingly said. "You wonder about the last seven or eight years. You wonder about Boston [where Manny played from 2001-2008].

"You wonder about all of it."

Though echoes of Ramirez's Dodgers past continue to reverberate in the organization, it's not like he left behind many close friends. Outfielders Matt Kemp and Andre Ethier both said they texted some with Manny during the winter but had not heard from him since spring training started. Furcal said he hasn't been in contact with Ramirez since he left Los Angeles last August.

"I didn't think this would happen again," Ethier said. "I don't think if this hadn't happened, [retirement] would be his decision.

"Unfortunately, circumstances forced him out of the game. I don't know if he felt uncomfortable, or he didn't have the confidence, to be the old Manny."

Or, perhaps, the skills.

"I don't even know what to say," Kemp said. "I haven't talked to him in awhile."

Furcal said the news "caught me by surprise" when a reporter told him what had happened with Ramirez shortly after the shortstop's arrival in the clubhouse Friday afternoon.

"That's bad," Furcal said. "He's still young. He's only 38 years old. He can still play.

"You never know what happens in other people's minds."

The Dodgers still owe Ramirez roughly $20 million in deferred salary through 2013. That is money still owed that will not be affected by his retirement.

 

Posted on: February 21, 2011 8:15 pm
 

Rays back to future with Manny, Damon

PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. -- Good Manny Ramirez, not Bad Manny, is here (for now).

So, too, is Johnny Damon -- who waltzed out of camp after Tampa Bay's first full-squad workout Monday in a comical, crisp white T-shirt reading "johnny biceps".

Nothing like the warmth, smiles and sunshine of early spring.

And the unbridled optimism that goes with it.

Say what you want about Ramirez and Damon and how maybe Tampa Bay would be better off if this was, say, 2004. The Rays will counter by insisting there is a method to their Maddon-ness.

"There was a lot of energy out there. At first I thought it was attributable to [infielder] Ray Olmedo," Tampa Bay manager Joe Maddon quipped of the largest opening day spring crowd any of the Rays remember.

"I really did. Then, seeing all the signs, I knew they were more interested in Manny and Johnny. Seeing [fans] moving around, it was almost like an NFL practice.

"We're not used to that. But we love it."

Ramirez stopped and signed several autographs on his way off of the field. Then he did a round of interviews with the Tampa Bay televisions stations covering the first workout (and then he did one with us, which you'll see later in the week when we post our Tampa Bay Camp Report).

Damon spent some 30 minutes doing rounds of media interviews after the workout.

Which is all well and good. But these Rays think they can contend despite losing Carl Crawford, Carlos Pena, Rafael Soriano and Joaquin Benoit to free agency, and trading Matt Garza and Jason Bartlett.

And as such, they didn't bring Damon and Ramirez in to perform some sort of circus act.

"It really augments our lineup," Rays general manager Andrew Friedman said. "It adds to our depth. We have a number of young players we're counting on this year. It adds protection in the event of injury or poor production from one of our young players, it allows us to be able to shelter them a little bit more."

And, Friedman noted, it helps balance the lineup. Damon is a lefty, Ramirez swings righty.

"Both grind at-bats, both have experience in the division and, more importantly, both wanted to get back into the fray. Both missed playing in the AL East and wanted to get back.

"They're definitely going to make our team better. The question is, how much?"

Part of that, the Rays hope, is by filling the veteran leadership void left by the departures of Crawford and Pena.

"If our young players watch the way Manny prepares every day, I'd be thrilled," said Friedman, who noted that Ramirez was in the cage hitting a few mornings ago at 7:30. "If they watch the way he studies video, and what he does to get his swing right, and the amount of time he puts into it, and our young guys emulate that, I'll be thrilled."

Ramirez has lost 12 pounds from last year after battling leg issues.

As for Damon, Friedman said, "he's going to add a lot to front part of our lineup, whether it's in the one or two hole. The way he grinds at-bats, the value he adds on the bases. We still feel like he's got a lot left in the legs, in the way he takes care of his body."

Maddon intends to have spring training scheduled out for both veterans.

"I want to pay attention to their legs," he said. "I want to set up a schedule in advance that they know they're going to have, and not just 'I'm a little tired today' or "I felt a little something coming out of the box.' I want to avoid those moments."

On Monday, as the Rays kicked things off, the moments were all light-hearted and festive.

The "johnny biceps" T?

"Someone sent it to me," Damon said.

And how many times have you worn it?

"Once before," he deadpanned. "It matches [the shorts]."

Meanwhile, as Manny was leaving for the day, he told me, "Put in a good word for me."

To whom, and for what, I have no idea.

Sunblock Day? Breeziest day yet in Florida, but still sunny and in the 80s.

Likes: Omar Vizquel still hanging around with the White Sox. ... Mary, the nice lady from Bemidji, Minn., who is a snowbird in the winter and works as an attendant outside the press room at Tampa Bay's camp in Port Charlotte. Her first year here, but her husband, a retired law enforcement guy, worked here last year and convinced her to join him at the ballyard. Nice people, and so cute. ... Bennett's Fresh Roast Coffee in Fort Myers. Best coffee house on the circuit. Phenomenal coffee and "hand-cut" donuts made on premises to rival Krispy Kreme's. Seriously. ... Carl Hiaasen's Double Whammy. Nobody lampoons Florida and its characters like Hiaasen, which makes it a perfect read for here. The county morgue is in a converted Burger King because it was the "only building in town with a walk-in freezer." And when the pathologist goes to examine a drowning victim, there's this: "The stench was dreadful, a mixture of wet death and petrified french fries."

Dislikes: Things still do not sound right in Justin Morneau's comeback from a concussion. ... Doing laundry in the hotel.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Like Miles Davis, I've been swayed by the cool
"There's just something about the summertime
"There's just something about the moon
"So I'll lay a kiss on a stone, toss it upside your window, by the roof
"Before you change your mind, Miles, bring in the cool

-- Gaslight Anthem, Miles Davis and The Cool

 

Posted on: August 30, 2010 2:45 pm
Edited on: August 30, 2010 3:00 pm
 

White Sox officially acquire Manny

The long, slow waiver dance is over: Manny Ramirez officially became property of the Chicago White Sox on Monday afternoon via their waiver claim, sources with knowledge of the talks told CBSSports.com.

The Dodgers and White Sox attempted to negotiate a trade Monday morning, according to sources, but the talks never gained traction. The Dodgers weren't thrilled with the prospects the White Sox offered, opting instead to dump the disgruntled player on the Sox.

Chicago now will be responsible for the entirety of the roughly $4.3 million left on Ramirez's 2010 contract -- roughly $1 million up front, and $3.3 million deferred.

Ramirez was said to still be in Los Angeles as of midday Monday PDT and planned to travel to Cleveland to join the White Sox later in the day. The Sox hope to have him in the lineup Tuesday for the middle game of their three-game series in Cleveland.

The White Sox hope Ramirez serves as an improvement from their current designated-hitter rotation of Andruw Jones, Mark Kotsay and Mark Teahen. It's not an altogether unfamiliar role for Manny: When he joined the Dodgers in 2008, he was acquired to beef up an offense that was being dragged down in part by the highly disappointing play of, yes, Jones.

Part of the reason the White Sox see this as a calculated gamble is because they think they will be receiving a highly motivated Manny who will be playing for a new contract (sound familiar?). A free agent this winter, Ramirez, at 38, has told friends he wants to play again next year and knows he needs a job in the American League, where he would DH. After leaving LA, Ramirez essentially will spend September in the dual role of trying to push the White Sox into the playoffs while playing for a 2011 contract.

So, the last official Manny Moment for the Dodgers was his defiant reaction to plate umpire Gary Cederstrom's called strike during a pinch-hitting appearance in the sixth inning of Sunday's game in Colorado.

Having been kept out of the lineup for four consecutive days, Ramirez, who also had pinch hit on Saturday, was called on to pinch hit in the sixth inning with the Dodgers down 8-2 and the bases loaded.

What followed was a bizarre moment that will go down in the annals of Manny Being Manny.

He went ballistic when Cederstrom called the first pitch -- which looked to be a couple of inches off the plate -- a strike, earning an ejection.

Yes, after called strike one.

Reed Johnson finished the at-bat by grounding into an inning-ending double play.

Though Ramirez was said not to have cursed at Cederstrom, it was another moment in a litany for Ramirez: A disgruntled man acting out in an effort to induce his current club to move him.

The acquisition culminates a month of interest from the White Sox, who first approached the Dodgers in the final couple of hours on July 31, before the non-waivers trading deadline. There wasn't enough time to explore it then, but the Sox maintained interest.

Ramirez has been on the disabled list three times this season, twice (and most recently) for a right calf strain. He's hitting .311 with a .405 on-base percentage, eight homers and 40 RBI.

After cracking two doubles Wednesday in Milwaukee, Dodgers manager Joe Torre held Ramirez out of the lineup for Thursday's series finale there and for all three games in Colorado this weekend. Among other things, Torre said he liked the "energy" brought by outfielder Scott Podsednik and he cited the vast Coors Field outfield as a reason for not playing Ramirez.

The White Sox, looking for an offensive boost, are 4 1/2 games behind Minnesota in the AL Central. If they do wind up with Ramirez as a straight-up waiver claim, it would be the second consecutive summer in which that happened. Last year, they claimed -- and were awarded -- outfielder Alex Rios from Toronto, inheriting his $60 million contract.

Ramirez has been on the disabled list three times this season, twice (and most recently) for a right calf strain. He's hitting .313 with eight homers and 40 RBI in 64 games and has not homered over his past 50 at-bats. The two doubles he collected Wednesday in Milwaukee were his first hits since June 28.

Posted on: August 29, 2010 8:18 pm
Edited on: August 29, 2010 9:10 pm
 

Manny expected to land with White Sox Monday

So long, Mannywood.

The Manny Ramirez era in Los Angeles is all over but the official shipping of the dreadlocks. A deal sending Ramirez to the Chicago White Sox is expected to happen on Monday, according to CBSSports.com sources.

Indications are that the White Sox may be awarded Ramirez via their waiver claim, which would mean they would be responsible for the remaining $4.3 million Ramirez is due in 2010 (roughly $1 million for the rest of the year, with $3.3 million deferred).

However, as of later Sunday evening the two clubs were still in discussions, and there remained the chance the White Sox would send a couple of prospects to Los Angeles in return for the Dodgers picking up some of the salary.

What the White Sox see is a sleeping giant who will be motivated once he sees fresh pastures and escapes LA, one who will improve their DH rotation that currently consists of Andruw Jones, Mark Teahen and Mark Kotsay.

What the Dodgers see is a chance to cut their losses on a one-time slugger who did great things two summers ago but who mostly has offered diminishing returns since 2009 -- and seriously diminishing returns this year.

The last official Manny Moment for the Dodgers now appears to be his impetuous -- defiant -- reaction to plate umpire Gary Cederstrom's called strike during a pinch-hitting appearance in the sixth inning of Sunday's game in Colorado.

Having been kept out of the lineup for four consecutive days, Ramirez, who also had pinch hit on Saturday, was called on to pinch hit in the sixth inning with the Dodgers down 8-2 and the bases loaded.

What followed was a bizarre moment that will go down in the annals of Manny Being Manny.

He went ballistic when Cederstrom called the first pitch -- which looked to be a couple of inches off the plate -- a strike, earning an ejection.

Yes, after called strike one.

Reed Johnson finished the at-bat by grounding into an inning-ending double play.

Though Ramirez was said not to have cursed at Cederstrom, it was another moment in a litany for Ramirez: A disgruntled man acting out in an effort to induce his current club to move him.

The dance between the White Sox and Dodgers started on July 31, when the Sox inquired about Ramirez's availability in the final couple of hours before the non-waivers trade deadline. There wasn't enough time to explore it then, but the Sox kept Ramirez in their crosshairs.

Ramirez has been on the disabled list three times this season, twice (and most recently) for a right calf strain. He's hitting .311 with a .405 on-base percentage, eight homers and 40 RBI.

After cracking two doubles Wednesday in Milwaukee, Dodgers manager Joe Torre held Ramirez out of the lineup for Thursday's series finale there and for all three games in Colorado this weekend. Among other things, Torre said he liked the "energy" brought by outfielder Scott Podsednik and he cited the vast Coors Field outfield as a reason for not playing Ramirez.

The White Sox, looking for an offensive boost, are 4 1/2 games behind Minnesota in the AL Central. If they do wind up with Ramirez as a straight-up waiver claim, it would be the second consecutive summer in which that happened. Last year, they claimed -- and were awarded -- outfielder Alex Rios from Toronto, inheriting his $60 million contract.

Ramirez has full no-trade powers but is not expected to enforce them. There is a chance he could seek financial incentives for waiving the no-trade clause, but it is believed that he wants out of Los Angeles badly enough that he will not ask for them.

Posted on: August 27, 2010 2:51 pm
Edited on: August 27, 2010 3:05 pm
 

White Sox claim Manny off waivers

Let the negotiations between the White Sox and Dodgers begin.

The White Sox, according to sources, won the waiver claim of one-time slugger, full-time diva Manny Ramirez on Friday and will have until Tuesday afternoon to broker a deal with the Dodgers.

AL West leader Texas, ultra-aggressive all summer, also put in a claim for Ramirez, according to sources with knowledge of the process. But because the White Sox's record is worse, Chicago was awarded the claim.

The Sox have been sending signals of their interest in Ramirez for nearly a month, starting with a phone call to Los Angeles in the hours leading up to the July 31 non-waivers trade deadline. The Dodgers and White Sox engaged in conversations that day but a potential deal was too complicated to finish before the deadline.

Now, the Sox and Dodgers appear poised to pick up those discussions where they left off then. Despite reports to the contrary, the two clubs have not held trade discussions centering on Ramirez since July 31, one source with knowledge of the talks reiterated to CBSSports.com on Friday.

During the talks on July 31, the Dodgers were determined not to simply dump Ramirez, that they would acquire some sort of value in exchange for him. That thinking remains the same. And adding intrigue to the situation is that the Dodgers now are coming off of a sweep of Milwaukee and have climbed back to within five games of San Francisco in the NL wild-card race.

There do, however, remain four teams ahead of the Dodgers: The Giants, Phillies, Cardinals and Rockies. But the point is, the Dodgers are close enough that the last thing they will want is to send off signals that they are waving a white flag.

Ramirez is owed roughly $4.3 million for the rest of the season. The expected course of action, if the Dodgers do deal him, is that they and the White Sox would reach an agreement on players, and the Dodgers would cover some -- but not all -- of Ramirez's remaining 2010 salary.

Ramirez has been on the disabled list three times this season, twice (and most recently) for a right calf strain. He's hitting .313 with eight homers and 40 RBI in 64 games and has not homered over his past 48 at-bats. The two doubles he collected Wednesday in Milwaukee were his first hits since June 28.

Posted on: August 26, 2010 7:00 pm
 

Manny's LA days continue to appear numbered

Manny Ramirez continues as a hot topic on the waiver wire, but if he's going to land in Chicago with the White Sox, there's still plenty of heavy lifting to be done.

The Dodgers have not spoken with the White Sox since July 31, according to a highly placed industry source, back when Chicago general manager Kenny Williams checked into the possibility of acquiring the one-time (and still?) slugger in the last couple of hours before the non-waivers trading deadline. The Sox do, however, continue to express interest in Ramirez and are expected to make a waiver claim.

What this means, simply, is that the waivers process is running its course. Ramirez clears on Friday, through which point clubs are free to claim him (NL clubs first, then AL). At that point, the Dodgers can either allow the claiming club to have him, or they can pull him back. If they pull him back, they would have until Tuesday afternoon to work out a deal with whichever club claims him, or they could keep him (unlikely, if he's claimed).

Ramirez is owed roughly $4.3 million for the rest of the season. If a team claims him and the Dodgers simply let him walk, the claiming team would be on the hook for all of that money. What's more likely, if a team claims him, is that the Dodgers would attempt to work out a deal in which they receive prospects in return for Ramirez and they would assume some of his remaining salary. Because of deferrels in his contract, Ramirez would be owed roughly $1.3 million this year and about $3.3 million in deferred salary.

He did not play in the Dodgers' 7-1 win over the Brewers on Thursday. The two doubles he collected in the Dodgers' 5-4 win over Milwaukee on Wednesday were his first hits since June 28.

Ramirez is hitting .313 with eight homers and 40 RBI in only 64 games this season. He's spent three different stints on the disabled list this season, twice for a strained right calf. He has not homered since June 19 -- a span of 48 at-bats.

While it is clear that Ramirez is a short-timer in Los Angeles -- his contract expires at the end of this season -- what's not clear is his exact expiration date.

He has full no-trade powers and could nix any deal. It is believed that he would accept a trade to the White Sox -- or an American League team -- because given his leg injuries, he's best suited now to be a DH.

 

Posted on: August 24, 2010 11:14 pm
 

Olde English D suits Damon well

SAN FRANCISCO -- Just when you think they're all mercenaries who only care about the next whopping contract, along comes Johnny Damon thumbing his nose at Boston.

We already knew Damon to be an exciting, if aging, ballplayer. We already knew him to be one of the game's extraordinarily nice guys.

Now we know he's not a phony.

Nothing against the Red Sox, who are doing a marvelous job of hanging in there despite losing players to the disabled list so frequently this summer that Terry Francona has been reduced to playing guys who are unrecognizable even to their own mothers.

But Damon has been there, done that, and it did not end pleasantly.

Looking for work this spring, he and his agent, Scott Boras, suddenly did more for Detroit's image than the Renaissance Center ever did. Damon professed his love for the Red Wings and all things Detroit. Boras rhapsodized about how much Damon always has loved Detroit.

It would have been sickening -- if it weren't true.

How do I know? Well, I couldn't resist. I sat down with Damon in Lakeland, Fla., this spring and administered a quiz covering all things Detroit and Michigan. Not only did he good-naturedly play along, he did quite well.

Anyway, seven months later, Damon told the Tigers he wouldn't accept a deal to Boston because Detroit is where he wants to be. He individually talked to all of his teammates first to make sure they still wanted him around. He said he hopes to play again in Detroit in 2011, and he said he knows that if manager Jim Leyland reduces his playing time down the stretch, it could cost him money on the free agent market this winter.

Didn't matter. Damon didn't want to change his stripes. (And his chances of stepping into a pennant race in Boston wasn't exactly guaranteed, either).

Next time you become disenchanted with the modern athlete for whatever reason, remember Damon. Maybe you hated him when he was with Boston, maybe you hated him when he was with the Yankees. Perhaps you never liked him with long hair, or maybe you were angry when he chopped his locks.

Whatever. Bottom line is, Damon showed this week he is a man of principle.

Likes: Ah, San Francisco. Gorgeous summer day today. Hot. It actually reached 100. And that brought the crazies out (even more than usual). Walking between the Rasputin music store and Border's books, I passed a raggedy-looking man on the street grinning and holding up a homemade sign fashioned from a cardboard box reading, "Ass watching is a sport." When I walked back 30 minutes later, he was still at his post proudly displaying his sign. Meantime, John Fay, Reds beat man for the Cincinnati Enquirer, saw two older men walking down the street completely naked protesting, as Fay said, something. ... If the White Sox do get Manny Ramirez on waivers, he and Ozzie Guillen will be quite a combo. And Guillen always thought Frank Thomas was a handful. ... Great run along the Embarcadero on Tuesday morning down to AT&T Park. Love the atmosphere around empty ballparks early in the day before they come to life at night.

Dislikes: Still haven't caught up to the final three Friday Night Lights episodes from this summer. Looking forward to carving out some time to see them. ... School starting again. I know lots of parents eagerly anticipate the kids going back. Not me. I like having mine around.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"When that last guitar's been packed away
"You know that I still want to play
"So just make sure you got it all set to go
"Before you come for my piano
"But the band's on the bus
"And they're waiting to go
"We've got to drive all night and do a show in Chicago
"or Detroit, I don't know
"We do so many shows in a row
"And these towns all look the same
"We just pass the time in our hotel rooms
"And wander 'round backstage
"Till those lights come up and we hear that crowd
"And we remember why we came"

-- Jackson Brown, The Load Out

Posted on: July 31, 2010 7:49 pm
 

Is Manny coming to end of the line in LA?

The Curious Case that is Manny Ramirez took another twist at the trade deadline Saturday when the Dodgers fielded offers for the disabled outfielder.

The door clearly has begun to crack open for his departure.

Question is, when?

After this season, when his two-year, $45 million contract expires?

In August, when he almost certainly will sail through waivers (and when it especially would be incumbent upon the Dodgers to investigate deals for him if they drop out of the pennant race)?

"This club is built with him as our left fielder," Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti said in a conference call shortly after Saturday's 4 p.m. EDT trade deadline passed. "We haven't had him for most of the year.

"That doesn't mean he can't provide us with some help the last couple of months."

Still, the man who stole headlines two Julys ago when the contending Dodgers scooped him up from Boston was back in them for a time in the final, crazy hours as clubs stampeded toward this year's trade deadline.

"We got a call from one team that offered us a very low dollar figure with no players attached to it," Colletti said in recapping the latest chapter in Mannywood. "That's what began it."

Though Colletti would divulge no specifics, industry sources have told CBSSports.com that it was the Chicago White Sox who came calling with ideas of installing Ramirez in the middle of their lineup as they work toward holding off Minnesota in the AL Central.

"Once it was out, a couple of teams called in the last 30, 45 minutes, but it was too cumbersome [to negotiate with the deadline closing in]" Colletti continued.

The GM would not confirm how many clubs phoned the Dodgers regarding Ramirez, only saying, tongue-in-cheek, that it was "a few more than one and less than 30."

Ramirez has full no-trade powers, but given his trouble with his legs this season, it is believed he would accept a deal to an AL club that would allow him a soft landing into a DH role.

"The team that had the strongest interest was trying to get another player that we had interest in with another club," Colletti said. "But that went by the wayside.

"We didn't start the rumor and we didn't float his name. The rumor was started by another team, and I'm not sure what they were trying to accomplish."

One industry source familiar with the White Sox suggested that it was all tied to Chicago's pursuit of Washington slugger Adam Dunn, that Chicago GM Kenny Williams was trying to bluff the Nationals.

The logic there would be that it was a gamble that the Nationals were more eager to rid themselves of Dunn than they let on, and the Ramirez rumors might pique their attention enough to go back to the White Sox and cut a deal for Dunn.

Whatever, no dice.

In the end, Nationals' GM Mike Rizzo called everyone's bluff and wound up keeping Dunn.

The Dodgers?

Well, first they need to get a healthy Ramirez back into their lineup.

Then, they need to climb back into the NL West race -- they opened Saturday trailing first-place San Diego by seven games, and they were 5 1/2 games behind San Francisco in the wild-card race. Then they lost a crushing 2-1 decision in San Francisco Saturday afternoon.

At some point then -- or during the process -- they'll assess.

One source close to the Ramirez talks Saturday said that "it has to be a good deal" for the Dodgers to trade Manny. And clearly, the Dodgers didn't think they were approached with one.

But with about $7 million remaining of his $20 million 2010 salary, Ramirez surely will pass through waivers, which will give the Dodgers freedom to trade him in August if they're approached with the right deal.

One very good question for now, though, is when the Dodgers might see him again.

Ramirez, 38, currently is on the disabled list for a third time this season, this time with a strained calf. He did not even travel with the Dodgers on their current trip to San Diego and San Francisco, opting to rehab at the club's Arizona spring training facility, and sources say the club has grown increasingly disenchanted with him this season as he has separated himself from the rest of the clubhouse.

The leg problems make him even more of a liability in the outfield, and his power has diminished significantly since last season's 50-game suspension for failing a test pertaining to baseball's performance-enhancement drug policy. In just 61 games this season (the Dodgers now have played 104), Ramirez has just eight homers and a .317 batting average.

When will Manny return?

"That's tough to say," Colletti said. "A week. Ten days, perhaps."

Colletti did very right by the Dodgers this week in adding speedy outfielder Scott Podsednik (from Kansas City), versatile infielder Ryan Theriot (Cubs), veteran starting pitcher Ted Lilly (Cubs) and closer/set-up man Octavio Dotel (Pirates). He's always been at his strongest during the July and August trading periods.

The roster is fortified and manager Joe Torre has even more options.

But as for Ramirez, whose production is diminishing and whose honeymoon in Hollywood is finished ... what's left?

Does the GM believe Manny will finish the season a Dodger?

"I sure hope so," Colletti said, pausing and choosing his words carefully. "I think he will be.

"Yeah, I guess I believe it. How's that?"

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com