Tag:Milwaukee Brewers
Posted on: December 9, 2009 3:14 pm
 

Brewers sign reliever LaTroy Hawkins

INDIANAPOLIS -- The Brewers have landed a second pitcher today, signing reliever LaTroy Hawkins to a two-year, $7.5 million deal, sources confirmed to CBSSports.com.

Earlier, the Brewers agreed with veteran starter Randy Wolf on a three-year, $29.75 million deal.

As for Hawkins, he went 1-4 with a 11 saves and a 2.13 ERA in 65 appearances for the Astros in 2009. Houston wanted him back but declined to offer more than one year. The Brewers got the deal done by offering two.

Hawkins, 37, has pitched for seven clubs over 15 big league seasons.

Category: MLB
Posted on: December 9, 2009 10:50 am
 

Brewers hope to land P Wolf today

INDIANAPOLIS -- The Brewers are optimistic that veteran free agent pitcher Randy Wolf is moving closer to accepting their three-year offer believed to be worth between $29 and $30 million, a source with knowledge of the talks told CBSSports Wednesday morning.

After cutting ties with Braden Looper, the pitching-thin Brewers are looking for at least a couple of starters. Wolf was non-tendered by the Dodgers following the 2009 season despite going 11-7 with a 3.23 ERA. He worked 214 1/3 innings in 34 starts and racked up an eye-popping total of 16 no-decisions.

Wolf, who also was courted by the Mets, among others, started Game 1 of the NL Division Series for the Dodgers against St. Louis.

 

Posted on: December 7, 2009 4:04 pm
 

Padres promote Chris Gwynn

INDIANAPOLIS -- The Padres, in the midst of a front-office shakeup under new chief executive officer Jeff Moorad and now new general manager Jed Hoyer, will name Chris Gwynn as director of player personnel, according to CBSSports.com sources.

Gwynn, the former major leaguer and brother of Hall of Famer Tony, has been a scout in the Padres organization for the past several years and has been widely expected to be promoted under Moorad. In his new role, he is expected to aid Hoyer in evaluating players, both inside and outside the Padres' organization.

Meantime, the Padres spent time Monday at the winter meetings interviewing candidates to fill their director of scouting position, open since Bill "Chief" Gayton was told in October that he was being reassigned.

Among those who have interviewed so far, according to sources, are Ric Wilson, currently the national cross checker for the Los Angeles Angels, and Ray Montgomery, assistant scouting director for the Milwaukee Brewers.

Posted on: March 16, 2009 3:39 pm
 

Brewers: Braun out for Team USA in WBC Tuesday

MARYVALE, Ariz. -- The Milwaukee Brewers were relieved Monday that slugger Ryan Braun's strained oblique does not appear to be serious, but regardless, general manager Doug Melvin said Braun will not play in Team USA's game against Venezuela in the World Baseball Classic.

"The doctors already looked at him, and they don't feel it's anything serious," Melvin said..

It's an odd position in which to be, a club looking on from afar as one of its centerpiece players suffers an injury that could compromise the team for the regular season.

"Maybe if they win (and advance to the semifinals) on the way to Los Angeles he can stop by here," Melvin said. "If there's any question about it, we'll tell him not to play."

The Brewers will watch the injury closely not just because Braun is one of their chief meal tickets this season, but also because it's in the same vicinity as the oblique strain that sidelined him for a portion of last season. He suffered that strain on Aug. 9 and, though he only missed a week and avoided a trip to the disabled list, it clearly hampered his production for the rest of the season.

But after watching the parade of Team USA players knocked out because of injuries -- Dustin Pedroia, Chipper Jones, Braun, closer Matt Lindstrom -- Melvin has bigger questions.

"Why is it only Team USA?" he said. "That's a good question we have to ask ourselves. What are we doing wrong?"

Part of it undoubtedly is because so many of the Latin players play winter ball, and the Japanese players begin training for the WBC in early January.

Team Mexico recently approached the Brewers about Yovani Gallardo's availability, but the Brewers never had to seriously consider the issue because Mexicans did not have a roster spot available. And no injuries have created one since.

"There just haven't been any other teams with all of these injuries," Melvin continued. "Do they take more time to prepare? Do they start in January? I'd like to see the other injury lists.

"We do have to look at it and see."

One concern regarding Braun is over whether the oblique strain could become chronic.

"I'm sure it possibly could, he swings the bat so hard," Melvin said. "Any injury, once you have it, could reoccur whether it's a wrist, a shoulder.

"We live in fear of injuries, general managers do."

Especially, right now, it seems, those GMs who have players playing for Team USA in the WBC.

Likes: Pudge Rodriguez to Houston. The WBC has been a nice audition for him, huh? He's 9-for-15 with two homers in five WBC games. ... A small adjustment at the plate, and Brewers infielder Craig Counsell is tearing it up this spring. ... Opening day now less than three weeks away. ... The Thursday and Friday of the NCAA tournament are the best two days, when games go for 12 hours. ... The thin pizza at Oregano's in Scottsdale. That stuff is dangerously good. ... The way the Brewers' ticket sales in Milwaukee are outpacing those from last year even without CC Sabathia and Ben Sheets. ... The elderly usher attending the stairs to the press box Maryvale Stadium who responded to my "how ya doin'" with this: "Still upright and taking in nourishment. Those are two good things." Yes, they are.

Dislikes: Every time I'm in Scottsdale Stadium for a game, I see the hospital across the street and can't help thinking back to Hall of Famer Kirby Puckett's sad death at such a young age. The Scottsdale hospital is where he was first rushed after suffering the stroke from which he would never recover.

Sunblock Day? Another day in the desert that couldn't be more perfect. Sunny, warm and probably around 80.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Train roll on many miles from my home,
"See, I'm riding my blues away
"Tuesday, you see, she had to be free
"But somehow I've got to carry on"

-- Lynyrd Skynyrd, Tuesday's Gone

 

Posted on: March 16, 2009 3:39 pm
 

Brewers: Braun out for Team USA in WBC Tuesday

MARYVALE, Ariz. -- The Milwaukee Brewers were relieved Monday that slugger Ryan Braun's strained oblique does not appear to be serious, but regardless, general manager Doug Melvin said Braun will not play in Team USA's game against Venezuela in the World Baseball Classic.

"The doctors already looked at him, and they don't feel it's anything serious," Melvin said..

It's an odd position in which to be, a club looking on from afar as one of its centerpiece players suffers an injury that could compromise the team for the regular season.

"Maybe if they win (and advance to the semifinals) on the way to Los Angeles he can stop by here," Melvin said. "If there's any question about it, we'll tell him not to play."

The Brewers will watch the injury closely not just because Braun is one of their chief meal tickets this season, but also because it's in the same vicinity as the oblique strain that sidelined him for a portion of last season. He suffered that strain on Aug. 9 and, though he only missed a week and avoided a trip to the disabled list, it clearly hampered his production for the rest of the season.

But after watching the parade of Team USA players knocked out because of injuries -- Dustin Pedroia, Chipper Jones, Braun, closer Matt Lindstrom -- Melvin has bigger questions.

"Why is it only Team USA?" he said. "That's a good question we have to ask ourselves. What are we doing wrong?"

Part of it undoubtedly is because so many of the Latin players play winter ball, and the Japanese players begin training for the WBC in early January.

Team Mexico recently approached the Brewers about Yovani Gallardo's availability, but the Brewers never had to seriously consider the issue because Mexicans did not have a roster spot available. And no injuries have created one since.

"There just haven't been any other teams with all of these injuries," Melvin continued. "Do they take more time to prepare? Do they start in January? I'd like to see the other injury lists.

"We do have to look at it and see."

One concern regarding Braun is over whether the oblique strain could become chronic.

"I'm sure it possibly could, he swings the bat so hard," Melvin said. "Any injury, once you have it, could reoccur whether it's a wrist, a shoulder.

"We live in fear of injuries, general managers do."

Especially, right now, it seems, those GMs who have players playing for Team USA in the WBC.

Likes: Pudge Rodriguez to Houston. The WBC has been a nice audition for him, huh? He's 9-for-15 with two homers in five WBC games. ... A small adjustment at the plate, and Brewers infielder Craig Counsell is tearing it up this spring. ... Opening day now less than three weeks away. ... The Thursday and Friday of the NCAA tournament are the best two days, when games go for 12 hours. ... The thin pizza at Oregano's in Scottsdale. That stuff is dangerously good. ... The way the Brewers' ticket sales in Milwaukee are outpacing those from last year even without CC Sabathia and Ben Sheets. ... The elderly usher attending the stairs to the press box Maryvale Stadium who responded to my "how ya doin'" with this: "Still upright and taking in nourishment. Those are two good things." Yes, they are.

Dislikes: Every time I'm in Scottsdale Stadium for a game, I see the hospital across the street and can't help thinking back to Hall of Famer Kirby Puckett's sad death at such a young age. The Scottsdale hospital is where he was first rushed after suffering the stroke from which he would never recover.

Sunblock Day? Another day in the desert that couldn't be more perfect. Sunny, warm and probably around 80.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Train roll on many miles from my home,
"See, I'm riding my blues away
"Tuesday, you see, she had to be free
"But somehow I've got to carry on"

-- Lynyrd Skynyrd, Tuesday's Gone

 

Posted on: February 5, 2009 2:48 pm
Edited on: February 5, 2009 2:54 pm
 

Sheets expects to have surgery soon


Ben Sheets, the injury-plagued, free-agent starting pitcher, is expected to undergo elbow surgery and be sidelined for four to six months, according to CBSSports.com sources.

The surgery, to repair Sheets' partially torn flexor tendon, is expected to be performed by noted orthopedist Dr. James Andrews in Birmingham, Ala. A source with knowledge of the situation said that Sheets is not expected to undergo Tommy John ligament replacement surgery.

Still, the elbow surgery likely will keep Sheets on the sidelines until August, or later. The right-hander was prepared to undergo surgery this week, according to sources, but those plans hit a snag over insurance issues and who would pay for it.

Sheets' agent, Casey Close, could not be reached for comment, but sources say that he maintains Milwaukee should pay for the surgery since the injury stems from his time with the Brewers. While that dispute is resolved, Sheets now hopes to have the surgery next week, sources say.

The news comes late in a winter that Sheets and many other free agents have found to be exceptionally cold, and it helps explain why several conversations between the right-hander and the Texas Rangers have yet to evolve into a contract.

Talks between the Rangers and Sheets reached an impasse within the past several days, according to a person with knowledge of the discussions. The two sides were close to agreement on a two-year deal, according to a major-league source, but they already had concerns regarding the right-handers' checkered health history. It is believed that the physical examination revealed the tear and caused the Rangers to scotch the deal.

Sheets' elbow became sore last September during a season in which the right-hander worked 198 innings -- his highest total since 2004. But he came up lame down the stretch and surrendered 10 runs and 15 hits in just over 10 innings of his final three starts. He was unable to pitch in Milwaukee's first-round playoff series loss to Philadelphia.

Since 2001, Sheets, 30, has spent time on the disabled list with right rotator cuff tendinitis, a severe inner-ear infection, a torn back muscle, a right shoulder strain, tendinitis in his right shoulder and a sprained right middle finger.

In eight seasons with the Brewers, Sheets has compiled an 86-83 career record with a 3.72 ERA. When he's healthy, Sheets has the stuff of a staff ace. But staying healthy has been his biggest challenge.

Sheets was 13-9 with a 3.01 ERA in 31 starts for the Brewers in 2008 and was the National League's starting pitcher in the All-Star Game. He also earned $11 million in the final season of a four-year, $38.5 million deal.

The Brewers offered him arbitration in December and, had he accepted, he likely would have gotten a raise from that $11 million for 2009. However, while Sheets' departure saved the Brewers some money, news of his likely impending surgery before he signed a free agent contract will cost Milwaukee draft picks. The Brewers were to receive two compensatory picks from the team signing Sheets.

Posted on: December 10, 2008 6:56 pm
 

Line of the Day

LAS VEGAS -- Asked whether he thought the economy could impact the seven-year, $161 million deal his now-former pitcher CC Sabathia is set to sign with the New York Yankees, Brewers general manager Doug Melvin quipped:

"It's a seven-year deal. I hope the economy gets better over the length of that."

Posted on: December 10, 2008 2:55 pm
 

Brewers, Melvin digest Sabathia's departure

LAS VEGAS -- The man who brought CC Sabathia to Milwaukee last summer learned definitively that the Brewers were losing him from an early morning telephone call from Greg Genske, the pitcher's agent.

But general manager Doug Melvin had already seen the breaking news on television around 3:30 a.m. local time Tuesday, and all Genske's call did was confirm his sinking feeling.

"Whenever you lose a player there's disappointment, but if you look at the track record of free agents, there are not many who stay with their teams," Melvin said. "Carlos Lee was going to become a free agent and we traded him, we lost Francisco Cordero ... we've always been met with these challenges."

The Brewers did what they could. Sabathia ultimately wound up with a seven-year deal worth just over $160 million, according to sources -- up from the Yankees' original offer of six years and $140 million. Sabathia also received an opt-out clause after three years, essentially giving him protection to escape if he does not like New York.

Melvin confirmed to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel's Tom Haudricourt that the Brewers had offered five years and "just over" $100 million. They were internally discussing whether to increase that offer, but the Yankees struck again -- essentially bidding against themselves -- before the Brewers had made a final decision. Melvin also said Genske had informed him that Sabathia would require an opt-out clause no matter where he went.

"Brian and the Yankees were going to be very aggressive in pursuing a top quality pitcher, and they stayed aggressive," Melvin said.

Sabathia's agreement with New York officially ends one of the most remarkable chapters in Brewers franchise history. And through the disappointment of losing him, Melvin said he will remember it as something special.

"We thought we had a chance (to keep him)," Melvin said. "There was a lot of talk that he was having some reluctance in going to New York. The Yankees made a good sell -- their ballpark, their history and their tradition. And the money ... I can't blame CC at all.

"We had a wonderful summer. He meant so much to the organization."

How much?

"3.2 million fans, an attendance record this past season, the playoffs ... we don't get there without him," Melvin said. "We were talking yesterday about how fun it was when we got him. He wanted to come in early. He pitched the start before the All-Star break and the start after the break."

And he pitched the Brewers all the way into October.

Now, the road to October looks longer for the Brewers than it has in at least the past three years. And perhaps longer.

Not only will they lose Sabathia, but starter Ben Sheets appears out the door as well. The Yankees have a strong offer to him as well, according to CBSSports.com sources, and the Brewers have decided not to make one. The combination of Sheets' checkered injury history and Yankee dollars apparently has scared them away.

So Milwaukee has two big holes in its rotation, and Melvin said the club's next task will be to get involved with some of the free-agent pitchers on the market. Currently, rotation would consist of Yovanni Gallardo, Dave Bush, Jeff Suppan, Manny Parra and Seth McClung or Carlos Villanueva.

And to those fans who undoubtedly will scream and holler about the unfair economic advantage the Yankees continue to maintain in today's game?

"Brian had to do what he had to do to make his club better," Melvin said. "Hey, I signed Alex Rodriguez in Texas. I know the abuse you took to be included in the biggest contract in the game.

"I've had one coming to me and now I'm losing one."

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com