Tag:San Diego Padres
Posted on: October 3, 2010 10:26 pm
 

Gutsy Padres put on heck of a show

SAN FRANCISCO -- In the end, a $40 million payroll was good for 29th in the majors, 90 victories and one big heartbreak on the final Sunday of the season.

The Padres pushed the Giants to the brink of a one-game playoff back in San Diego on Monday, but couldn't push them over the edge. San Francisco's 3-0 win here Sunday earned the Giants the NL West title, and Atlanta's win over Philadelphia gave the Braves the NL wild-card berth.

The Padres head home for the winter after a summer of vastly exceeding expectations.

Even in losing, this was one special team.

"It shows that if you have a bunch of guys committed to the team concept, you can compete in this league," second baseman David Eckstein said, "We had a good mix of guys. That's the tough thing about it.

"Because no one is going to care because we didn't make it."

Sad truth is, Eckstein probably is right -- but he should be wrong.

What the Padres did should have been headline news. They were the game's best story throughout the season.

They were the perfect team for these roiling economic times. They stretched their budget. They made more with less. They were responsible and paid attention to small details.

"A lot of clubs out there, small-market clubs, I'd love for them to take a page out of what we did," Eckstein said. "It proves anything is possible."

The Padres held first place from June 18 through September 16.

They and the Yankees were the only clubs to not lose more than three consecutive games until the Padres were ambushed by a 10-game losing streak beginning on Aug. 26 that ultimately became a mortal wound.

"It's a team game made up of individual battles," manager Bud Black said. "This truly was a team in the sense that guys cared about each other. The unselfishness. Guys understood what I was doing and what the coaches were doing.

"It was fabulous how strong, as a group, the team concept was. It was awesome."

The whole was far greater than the sum of the parts. And as these Padres quietly prepared for their final charter flight home of 2010, though it was a somber clubhouse, there was pride in what they had accomplished.

"I'm never one to be disappointed at the end of the year," said slugger Adrian Gonzalez, who now, along with closer Heath Bell, probably will re-enter the trade rumors market this winter. "You give it your all. When you play your heart out every day, you have nothing to hang your head about.

"Whether we came up one game short or 10 games short, I gave it all I had.

Likes: The Giants are deserving champions. Totally revamped lineup, and together with Tim Lincecum and Matt Cain, Aubrey Huff, Buster Posey, Pat Burrell and Co. will be tough in the playoffs. ... Every time I come to San Francisco, the beauty of AT & T Park hits me all over again. ... On to the playoffs. ... Michaelangelo's Café in North Beach. ... Congratulations to Coach Jack Giarmo, my old classmate, for notching his 100th win as Monroe (Mich.) St. Mary Catholic Central rolled over Grosse Ile 49-13 on the high school football fields Friday night. Coach Jack has the Falcons rolling again, I love it.

Dislikes: It's always a severe and harsh split when a baseball season ends. People you see practically every day of the summer, suddenly, you're done seeing some of them until next February, March or April. Reaching the end of a season is kind of like reaching the end of the school year. It's been a long grind and you're happy to be done, but you'll miss seeing a lot of friends. Looking forward to seeing some of those friends over these next several weeks in the playoffs.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Educated in a small town
"Taught the fear of Jesus in a small town
"Used to daydream in that small town
"Another born romantic that's me
"But I've seen it all in a small town
"Had myself a ball in a small town
"Married an L.A. doll and brought her to this small town
"Now she's small town just like me"

-- John Mellencamp, Small Town

Posted on: October 2, 2010 9:42 pm
 

Latos, Sanchez set for dramatic finale in SF

SAN FRANCISCO -- As if Sunday's series finale here wasn't dramatic enough, the two starting pitchers are guys who have been involved in controversy during the Giants-Padres skirmishes this season.

Before a mid-August series with the Padres, left-hander Jonathan Sanchez boldly predicted the Giants would sweep San Diego, seize first place in the NL West and not look back.

The Giants wound up losing two of three in San Francisco this weekend. The losing pitcher in the Friday game? Sanchez.

Meanwhile, right-hander Mat Latos, San Diego's struggling ace, gets the ball in Sunday's regular season finale and surely will be a target of another sellout crowd. The San Francisco media seized upon one of Latos' comments to CBSSports.com following Tuesday's frustrating loss to the Cubs, and it's caused quite a stir in the area.

After losing to the Cubs as the Giants took first place in the NL West, Latos said that, "Baseball works in funny ways. The only way I could honestly put it is, we could be like the Giants and go and change our whole lineup, put guys with 'San Francisco Giants' across their jerseys. We didn't. We added two guys [Miguel Tejada and Ryan Ludwick]. We've been the same team all year. We haven't just gone and grabbed guys from other teams."

Since the season started, the Giants have added Pat Burrell, Jose Guillen, Mike Fontenot, Cody Ross and relievers Ramon Ramirez and Javier Lopez. Ross earlier this week called Latos' comments "asinine."

Latos, 22, is 14-9 with a 2.92 ERA, including a 2-1 mark and a 2.25 ERAS in five games started against the Giants this season.

But over his past four starts, Latos has a 10.13 ERA and has not made it out of the sixth inning.

"He has to be calm," Padres first baseman Adrian Gonzalez said. "He has to be calm and relaxed, let his talent take over. He can't let his emotions get in the way of his talent.

"He lets his emotions get to him and then he starts throwing the ball instead of making his pitches. The biggest thing will be keeping his composure."

Sanchez, 27, is 12-9 with a 3.15 ERA in 33 starts this season, and his history with San Diego is an interesting one.

He no-hit the Padres in July, 2009. He also was on the losing end of a 1-0 decision in San Diego in April during which he held the Padres to just one hit over seven innings.

"Jonathan's done a great job for us," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. "We need him to go out and give us a chance."

Posted on: September 29, 2010 1:45 am
 

Hitless Padres threatening to go out with whimper

SAN DIEGO -- Adrian Gonzalez made a bold prediction on Sept. 15, after his squad took two of three in Colorado: If the Padres scored four or five runs a game the rest of the way, they would win the NL West.

Since then, the numbers have conspired badly against Gonzalez and his Padres.

They have mustered just four or more runs only five times in 12 games since that day.

In those five games, they're 4-1.

In the seven games in which they've scored three or fewer, the Padres are 1-6.

Emphasizing the struggle, San Diego has managed only a total of four runs over its past 27 innings.

Since Aug. 24 in spacious Petco Park, the Padres are 0-9 when they allow four or more runs at home.

San Diego's 5-2 loss to the Cubs on Tuesday night was devastating to the Padres not just because they now trail the Giants by two games in the NL West and Atlanta by 1 1/2 games in the wild-card chase. No, the loss also was devastating in the method.

The normally sure-footed Padres committed three errors. Mat Latos failed to field a ball in the fifth and, three batters later, Miguel Tejada, ranging into the hole to field Starlin Castro's grounder, threw the ball into the dugout when he had no play.

Gold Glover Adrian Gonzalez booted a ground ball in the seventh and failed to cover first base on a play in the ninth (second baseman David Eckstein threw to pitcher Edward Mujica for the out as Gonzalez stood frozen, watching).

"Baseball works in funny ways," said Latos, now 0-4 with a 10.13 ERA over his past four starts. "The only way I could honestly put it is, we could be like the Giants and go and change our whole lineup, put guys with 'San Francisco Giants'  across their jerseys. We didn't.

"We added two guys [Tejada and Ryan Ludwick, now hitting .221 with five homers in 54 games with the Padres]. We've been the same team all year. We haven't just gone and grabbed guys from other teams."

In the season's final week, the contenders making the least number of mistakes emerge to play another day. It's that simple.

And when you're dragging around an anchor of an offense the size of the Padres', your margin for error is minimal.

Likes: The Cincinnati Reds store staying open all night at Great American Ballpark on Tuesday after they clinched. Very cool. Good for the Reds. ... The Baseball Project and Craig Finn (of The Hold Steady) with their new song Don't Call Them Twinkies. Great stuff, with a clear eye for the history of the Twins. Make sure to check it out.

Dislikes: Come on. The guy who owns the Segway company dies when ... he apparently accidentally rides his Segway over a cliff in England? How ironic is that?

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"You gotta grow, you gotta learn by your mistakes
"You gotta die a little everyday just to try to stay awake"

-- Gerry Rafferty, Get it Right Next Time

 

Posted on: September 28, 2010 1:29 am
 

Ken Burns at the top of his game

Given documentary filmmaker Ken Burns' talent for storytelling, were he to draw them up, each baseball season would ebb and flow in perfect cadence, with six divisional races each thundering toward its own unique and dramatic climax right up until the final day of the season.

Being that the game has a mind of its own and refuses to be tamed, we're left to settle for Burns' forays into documenting it for PBS.

Given his latest work -- The Tenth Inning, to be shown on your local PBS television station in two parts on Tuesday and Wednesday -- it's a pretty darned good trade-off.

Picking up where he left off in Baseball, which, with some 43 million viewers, was the most-watched series in PBS history, Burns and his co-producer (and co-director) Lynn Novick hit all the right notes in The Tenth Inning. From the dramatic opening showing a young Barry Bonds with an ominous hint of what's to come, Burns and Novick reel you in quickly and keep things moving at a nice, crisp pace that Greg Maddux would appreciate.

Particularly good is their treatment of the 1994-1995 players' strike and the resulting break in trust with the fans, the examination of the Latin American and Asian influx into the game (there's some great, if brief, Roberto Clemente footage, and some good stuff on Ichiro Suzuki) and the treatment of the Mark McGwire-Sammy Sosa home run chase in 1998.

You can't help but be moved by the excellent chapter on 9/11 and baseball in its aftermath. And as the documentary moves beyond that into Bonds chasing the single-season and all-time home run records, his gargantuan size is maybe even more striking in hindsight than it was at the time. From there, the handling of the game's steroids scandal is skillful.

Among the interviews woven throughout, those with Joe Torre and Pedro Martinez are especially good. So, too, are those from MSNBC's Keith Olbermann -- who tells a wonderful story of meeting a New York cop on the street on the day baseball resumed following 9/11 -- and Sacramento Bee columnist Marcos Breton.

There are so many small, perfect touches throughout that I won't get into all of them. But a couple of small examples -- and those of you who regularly read this space on the Internet know how I relate to all things music -- are from the soundtrack: As Burns and Co. are covering the Braves winning the World Series in '95, Georgia's Allman Brothers are playing in the background. And behind a segment on the Cleveland Indians of the '90s is music from Ohio-native Chrissie Hynde.

There are so many more examples like that, big and small. The Tenth Inning is beautifully done and, if you love baseball (or even are just OK with baseball but love American history), it's worth scheduling a couple of hours Tuesday night and a couple more Wednesday night to make sure you see this.

And if you can't, it's definitely worth DVRing for a look when you get a free night or two.

Believe me, you'll be thrilled that you did.

Likes: The 50th anniversary Monday of Ted Williams blasting a home run in his final at-bat before retiring, perhaps the most memorable final act in any Hall of Fame career -- and certainly the only one to be the subject of such beautiful prose as John Updike's Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu, the author's famous essay for the New Yorker. In commemoration of the 50th anniversary, the Library of America is presenting a cool little book reprinting Updike's original essay, plus an autobiographical preface and a terrific new afterward prepared by the author just months before his death. This is the essay in which Updike begins "Fenway Park in Boston is a lyric little bandbox of a place. ..." and, after describing Williams running around the bases with his head down and refusing to tip his cap to the crowd -- curtain calls wouldn't become customary until years later -- includes this sublime bit of writing: "... But immortality is nontransferable. The papers said that the other players, and even the umpires on the field, begged him to come out and acknowledge us in some way, but he refused. Gods do not answer letters." If you're interested in the book, you can find more details (including ordering information) here.

Dislikes: Really hate to see Atlanta's Martin Prado go down with what surely looked like an oblique injury in Monday's game against Florida. This week's battle for two playoff spots involving the Braves, San Diego and San Francisco is going to be riveting, and you really don't want to see teams depleted. Atlanta already lost Chipper Jones weeks ago. ... Meantime, will injuries to Tampa Bay's Evan Longoria (quad) and Minnesota's J.J. Hardy (ankle) this week turn into significant issues for October?

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Pretty girls from the smallest towns
"Get remembered like storms and droughts
"That old men talk about for years to come"

-- Drive-By Truckers, Birthday Boy

Posted on: September 24, 2010 9:17 pm
 

Lopez vetoes Padres waiver claim, joins Red Sox

The strange late-season saga of infielder Felipe Lopez has taken another unlikely twist: Blowing off the possibility of playing in a pennant race in the season's last 10 days, Lopez has agreed to join the Boston Red Sox after spurning the Padres.

Released by the Cardinals earlier this week after a disappointing offensive performance (.231 average, .310 on-base percentage) and being habitually late, the Padres moved in and claimed him off waivers. After losing Jerry Hairston Jr. for the season to a stress fracture in his leg, the Padres have been frantically looking to add infield depth for the season's final push.

Lopez, however, vetoed the waiver claim and then signed with the Red Sox.

Though Lopez would not have been eligible for San Diego's playoff roster, Hairston's injury has left the Padres alarmingly short of infield depth as they battle San Francisco and Colorado for the NL West division title and Atlanta for the wild-card slot.

Miguel Tejada, 36, has become the everyday shortstop since his late-July acquisition from Baltimore. Initially, the plan was for Tejada to plug into shortstop while Hairston played second until David Eckstein returned from a calf injury. After that, the Padres intended to mix Tejada into shortstop with Hairston and into third base with Chase Headley.

Headley is in a .194 slide (7 for 36) over his past 10 games and looks fatigued. His workload has been heavy: In just his second full season, he ranked fifth in the NL with 581 at-bats heading into Friday's series opener with Cincinnati.

Without Hairston -- and with Lopez declining to join the stretch run -- the Padres are left with Headley at third, Tejada at short, Eckstein at second and Everth Cabrera as a backup shortstop/second baseman.

Why would the Red Sox want him at this point? Among other reasons, one industry source said the Red Sox made the move so that they would receive a compensatory draft pick if someone signs him on the free agent market this winter.

Posted on: September 22, 2010 3:12 pm
Edited on: September 22, 2010 5:37 pm
 

Towers, others know where bones buried in West

Welcome to the start of Frontier Days in the NL West.

Everything is set but a Duel from 50 paces.

Arizona has hired Kevin Towers to fill the job for which it turned him down for five years ago.

And as the Diamondbacks general manager, Towers now will take direct aim at the man who fired him in San Diego last October ... and the man who was running the Diamondbacks back in 2005 and declined to hire Towers then: Jeff Moorad.

Survivor?

Let's see some network reality show beat this.

Nothing fuels rivalries more than when they're personal. And if guys privately wanting to gouge out other guys' eyeballs qualifies as personal, well, this has become the NL Wild, Wild West and the next couple of years could be incredibly bloody, er, juicy.

Start with Towers, who is still stung by the sudden end of his 14-year run in San Diego as the most successful GM in Padres history. And as this year's club of overachieving Padres built largely by Towers has contended for the NL West title, the wound remains raw.

Move next to Moorad who, as vice-chairman and chief executive officer of the Padres since January, 2009, continues to own a share of the Diamondbacks.

Sound funny, a guy who will be majority owner of the Padres who still owns a piece of the Diamondbacks? It should. Baseball rules preclude it, which is why Moorad has been working toward divesting his shares of the Arizona club.

Except, privately, according to sources, Moorad and the Diamondbacks have been unable to agree on a price for his shares. Moorad values his piece of the Diamondbacks much higher than Arizona owner Ken Kendrick and Co. think it is worth. The dispute has moved to the Commissioner's Office, and the stalemate continues.

Given the antipathy between Kendrick and Towers and Moorad, we probably won't even have to wait for the 2011 season to start before the two sides go at it. Do not be surprised if Towers raids the Padres and recruits some of his former colleagues as he builds his staff in the desert.

Meantime ... Moorad and the Padres this month hired A.J. Hinch as vice-president and director of pro scouting. Hinch was fired as the Diamondbacks manager on July 2, barely more than one year after he was named as manager to replace the fired Bob Melvin in Arizona by ... Moorad and Co. Specifically, by then-GM Josh Byrnes, whom Moorad picked over Towers in '05 (and whom the Diamondbacks fired, along with Hinch, on July 2).

While the Diamondbacks and Padres now have all the ingredients for a classic shoot-'em-up, don't discount the other angle in what has become an incredibly incestuous viper pit of a division.

Giants manager Bruce Bochy essentially was told by the Padres to go look for greener pastures when Sandy Alderson was the CEO following the 2006 season. Bochy worked under Towers in San Diego for 11 of his 12 years as Padres manager before, with a year left on his contract, Alderson made Bochy feel like he'd better go explore other options.

Time was, before Padres owner John Moores' marriage hit the skids and he became an absentee (and broke) owner, Moores told Towers and Bochy they would be in place as long as he owned the team.

Bochy still maintains a home in San Diego in the off-season. And though time has eased some of the rawness of his Padres departure -- he's in his fourth season managing the Giants -- no question that as San Diego, San Francisco and Colorado sprint down the stretch this September, beating the Padres is personal with Bochy (and his third-base coach Tim Flannery, who both played and coached for the Padres before being let go).

As for Towers taking over the Diamondbacks, the hiring is a coup. Working mostly with underfunded budgets during his 14 seasons in San Diego, Towers still managed to build four NL West winners, and one NL pennant winner (1998).

Known especially for his adroit work in building a pitching staff, it was Towers who acquired key members of a Padres bullpen that has been the most airtight in the majors this summer. The Padres' majors-leading 2.85 bullpen ERA and has been one key reason for the club's contending status.

If he can work that kind of magic with what has been a historically bad Arizona bullpen in 2010 -- the Diamondbacks relievers rank last in the majors with a 5.82 ERA -- then changing fortunes for the beleaguered Snakes could come sooner rather than later.

Already, well-respected interim GM Jerry DiPoto -- who will leave the organization after not being named to the permanent post -- has helped re-stock the rotation with a couple of July acquisitions, most notably that of young Daniel Hudson.

Among the details awaiting Towers is the fate of interim manager Kirk Gibson, who is expected to be retained for the 2011 season while the new GM gets the lay of the land. The two men met Wednesday morning in what was originally scheduled to be a 30-minute session. Two hours later, they were still gabbing.

"I liked the look in his eye and what he had to say," Towers said. "He probably deserves more time to set a foundation in a spring training-type environment."

Towers pointed out that Gibson has learned from "some great people", baseball men such as Jim Leyland and Sparky Anderson.

"He's an intense guy," Towers said. "I like him."

But don't expect Towers to need much time to assess the lay of this land. The game's longest-tenured GM when the Padres let him go last October, Towers knows this land very well. A little too well even, in spots.

Towers' nickname? Gunslinger.

Perfect

 

Posted on: September 15, 2010 9:00 pm
 

Keepin' the faith with the Padres

DENVER – "Believe", read the T-shirts the San Diego Padres are wearing around the clubhouse and underneath their jerseys these days. And this is how much faith All-Star Adrian Gonzalez has in the Padre pitching staff:

"If we score four or five runs a game the rest of the way," Gonzalez said after the Padres won two of three in Coors Field, "we're going to win the West."

Runs always have been at a premium for the Padres, but never so much so as over the past couple of weeks, when they fell into a 10-game losing streak and struggled to pull themselves out of it.

Until they scored six runs in Monday's opener here, they had gone 16 consecutive games scoring four or fewer runs.

But they continue to lead the majors in pitching (3.22 ERA). The Padres top the majors in bullpen ERA (2.78), and they're third in starters' ERA (3.64), just behind Oakland (3.52) and St. Louis (3.54).

"We're going to win this division with our pitching," Gonzalez said, emphasizing that the onus is on the hitters.

Taking two of three games in Colorado from a team that was riding a 10-game winning streak and owns the second-best home record in the majors (51-24), Gonzalez said, allowed the Padres to regain their breath.

"We're in good shape," he said. "I like the fact that we've got C.Y. [Chris Young] back, the pitching staff still doing what they're doing ... offensively, Luddy [Ryan Ludwick] is coming around, Miggy [Miguel Tejada] swung the bat well this series.

"We're going to score runs. We're going to be good."

Likes: Coors Field is hell on pitchers, but it's a pretty park. ... This NL West three-way with the Padres, Giants and Rockies is great stuff. ... The division might have tightened significantly over the past week, but you'd never know it from talking to Padres manager Bud Black. Calm and cool, he's living up to his old nickname, Mr. Freeze. ... Great run along the Cherry Creek on a hot day in Denver. It's been in the 80s all week. Beautiful. ... The AL Cy Young debate. You take CC Sabathia's workload and success? Or Felix Hernandez's singular dominance? It's going to be a good one. ... Southwest Airlines. One of the few airlines that treat you like an actual human being. ... Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson.

Dislikes: Legendary scout Al LaMacchia passes away at the age of 89. Among many, many others, he signed Cito Gaston and Dale Murphy.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"The rain kept drivin' but the Caddy kept on burnin' rubber
"We kept on drivin' till we ran into some fog cover
"We couldn't see a thing somehow we just kept on goin'
"We kept on drivin' all night long and then into the mornin'
"Before it finally lifted when we looked to see where we was at
"We're starin' at a Colorado state policeman trooper's hat go"

-- Bob Seger, Get Out of Denver

Posted on: September 14, 2010 1:28 am
 

Tejada wins battle, Padres win the war

DENVER – Losers of 13 of their past 17 games and having watched a large first-place lead melt to nothing, the Padres to a man were on the top step of their dugout, hanging on the railing, when Miguel Tejada stepped up in the first inning with one out and one on.

The white-hot Rockies had won 10 in a row in what has evolved into a riveting NL West race.

With Tejada at the plate, the Padres' case of suspended animation was about to continue.

He battled Colorado starter Jeff Francis for nine pitches before ripping a two-run homer well over the left-field wall to kick-start San Diego's 6-4 win and break Colorado's 10-game winning streak.

For a badly slumping team that had scored only 38 runs over its past 17 games, Tejada produced exactly what was needed.

"He fought," manager Bud Black said. "Francis threw him everything. Miggy had some reactionary swings to some pitches, and he fought some balls off."

Tejada was behind in the count 0-1 and 1-2 before fouling off one pitch, taking a ball, fouling off another pitch, taking ball three and then fouling off two more. Then, bam. He crushed a full-count, 89 m.p.h. fastball.

"That was a great at-bat," Black said. "Those at-bats in a game, over the course of the game and after, you look back and say, 'That was a hell of an at-bat.'"

It was a veritable offensive boon for the Padres. Tejada wound up with four RBIs, and San Diego's Nos. 2-5 hitters -- Aaron Cunningham, Tejada, Adrian Gonzalez and Ryan Ludwick -- went 9-for-15.

The Padres led 5-0 but, as is typical in Coors Field, the Rockies charged back to within 5-4 -- Troy Tulowitzski's three-run homer in the fifth aided that -- before San Diego's six-man relief effort over 4 1/3 innings halted them.

"You talk about this park, a four- or five-run lead is really a one- or two-run lead," Black said. "You never really know how a game is going to play out here. You really don't."

Likes: Great drama in the ninth when, with the Padres ahead 6-4, closer Heath Bell walked leadoff man Seth Smith to ensure he would have to face smoking hot Carlos Gonzalez. Sure enough, CarGo, leading the NL in batting average, stepped to the plate with two out and one on. Bell induced a bouncer to shortstop. "Tonight, I broke his bat and I won," Bell said. "Hopefully, I don't have to face him tomorrow." ... Great game in Tampa, er, St. Petersburg on Monday. Tampa Bay moves into first place in the AL East with the 1-0 win. David Price and CC Sabathia lived up to the billing, one day after Tim Lincecum-Mat Latos didn't (well, Latos didn't) in the Giants-Padres battle in San Diego. ... Fontano's Chicago Subs in Denver. Had never been there before until lunch Monday, but will be back. ... Monroe (Mich.) St. Mary Catholic Central drilling Riverview on the high school football field Friday night. Excellent win in moving to 2-1. Next victim for the Falcons: Flat Rock.

Dislikes: Hate to see Florida shut down ace Josh Johnson with back issues, but it's the smart thing to do. So many people don't realize how good that guy is. ... The Video Music Awards the other night. Watched the first 30 minutes, and I never realized what a classless pig Chelsea Handler is. I've seen her books, but wow, her act was tiresome quick.

Rock 'N' Roll Lyric of the Day:

"Born into Nixon I was raised in hell
"A welfare child where the teamsters dwelled
"The last one born, and the first one to run
"My town was blind from refinery sun
"My generation is zero
"I never made it as a working class hero
"21st century breakdown
"I once was lost but never was found
"I think I am losing what's left of my mind
"To the 20th century deadline"

-- Green Day, 21st Century Breakdown

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com