Tag:Creighton
Posted on: April 26, 2010 3:37 pm
Edited on: April 26, 2010 3:44 pm
 

McDermott reaches deal with Creighton


Iowa State's Greg McDermott, after weighing his options through the night, accepted an offer Monday to replace Dana Altman at Creighton, a source told CBSSports.com.

An introductory press conference could come as early as Tuesday.

This develop marks a return to the Missouri Valley Conference for McDermott, who rose to prominence while leading Northern Iowa to three straight NCAA tournaments before taking the Iowa State job in 2006. He coached the Cyclones for four seasons but finished 10th-or-worse each of the past three, and he was likely one more bad record from being fired, meaning McDermott's move from ISU to Creighton is similar to the move Steve Alford made from Iowa to New Mexico three years ago.

The deal is believed to be worth $10 million over nine years.

Altman left Creighton on Saturday after 16 seasons.
Posted on: April 26, 2010 12:53 am
Edited on: April 26, 2010 12:55 am
 

Creighton set to hire ISU's McDermott


A television station in Omaha reported Sunday that Creighton has replaced Dana Altman with Iowa State's Greg McDermott. Meantime, a source close to Creighton told CBSSports.com that McDermott still hasn't formally accepted the offer, but that he will Monday barring a change of plans.

An introductory press conference could come as early as Tuesday.

This would be a return to the Missouri Valley Conference for McDermott, who rose to prominence by leading Northern Iowa to three straight NCAA tournaments before taking the Iowa State job in 2006. He's coached the Cyclones for four seasons but finished 10th-or-worse each of the past three, and he's likely one more bad record at ISU from being fired, meaning McDermott's move from ISU to Creighton would be similar to Steve Alford's move from Iowa to New Mexico.

Altman left Creighton on Saturday after 16 seasons.

He'll be introduced at Oregon on Monday.
Posted on: April 24, 2010 7:59 pm
Edited on: April 24, 2010 8:01 pm
 

Done Deal: Oregon hiring Creighton's Altman


Creighton's Dana Altman has, as expected, agreed in principle to become Oregon's next basketball coach, a source confirmed to CBSSports.com on Saturday.

FoxSports.com first reported the news.

A formal announcement should come Sunday.

The press conference will likely be Monday at Oregon.

Altman has made seven NCAA tournaments in 16 seasons at Creighton. He famously accepted the Arkansas job three years ago but turned back after discovering he wasn't comfortable with the situation at the SEC school. Arkansas subsequently hired John Pelphrey.

This hire comes seven weeks after it was first reported that Oregon would fire Ernie Kent. The school tried to replace him with a number of high-level coaches -- among them Gonzaga's Mark Few, Pittsburgh's Jamie Dixon, Butler's Brad Stevens and Missouri's Mike Anderson -- but was rejected each time, either formally or informally.
Posted on: April 24, 2010 1:33 pm
Edited on: April 24, 2010 2:42 pm
 

Altman nearing deal with Oregon


Creighton's Dana Altman, barring a snag in negotiations, will accept an offer to become Oregon's next men's basketball coach, a source close to Altman confirmed to CBSSports.com on Saturday.

Assuming everything goes as planned, a formal announcement could come Sunday.

Altman has made seven NCAA tournaments in 16 seasons at Creighton. He famously accepted the Arkansas job three years ago but turned back after discovering he wasn't comfortable with the situation at the SEC school. Arkansas subsequently hired John Pelphrey.

This development comes seven weeks after it was first reported that Oregon would fire Ernie Kent. The school tried to replace him with a number of high-level coaches -- among them Gonzaga's Mark Few, Pittsburgh's Jamie Dixon, Butler's Brad Stevens and Missouri's Mike Anderson -- but was rejected each time, either formally or informally.
Posted on: December 16, 2009 3:51 pm
 

Dear Gary (on Dana Altman's stupid technical)


Here's Wednesday's Dear Gary ...

Dear Gary: You get the "Irresponsible Journalist Award" for the week and the competition is stiff these days. Congratulations! Just because the game is near the end and tight, that does not give the coach license to run his mouth, be unsporting and berate an official. The coach cost his team a chance to win, not the T administered by the official. This is the kind of drivel that people read and then think it is socially acceptable to behave in unsporting ways because the game is close. Get real. How are you qualified to assess an official's body of work? Is it because of your vast knowledge of officiating rules and philosophy that you have attained over the years spending thousands of dollars of your own money and months at a time in the offseason at training clinics? Is it the hours you have spent reading over the rule book and CCA Manual each year (bet you don't even know what CCA is without Google)? Is it the hours you've spent studying case plays and discussing various plays over the years with your officiating supervisors and colleagues? Please enlighten me on your qualifications to judge the quality of officiating? I will not hold my breath for a response as I know you have none of the above, nor do you have the capacity to formulate a reasonable response based on the elementary school writing I have experienced in your other articles. Stick to writing about what you do know about. I am not sure what that is, but it isn't officiating.

-- Brendan


My Monday Look Back column must've ended up on some college referees message board or something, because I got about eight emails this morning just like the one above, and they all came within an hour of each other. If you missed the Monday Look Back , here's what I wrote that garnered these angry responses ...

------------------------------

The weekend's terrible officiating award goes to Brad Gaston.

You won't believe what this dude did.

Creighton was up 72-70 on Saturday at George Mason when Justin Carter was called for a block with 18 seconds remaining. Like any coach would, Dana Altman protested the block/charge call, at which point Gaston hit Altman with a technical foul. So George Mason got two technical free throws, and Luke Hancock made them both. Then Cam Long, who was fouled on the play, hit one of two free throws to give George Mason a 73-72 lead.

Creighton, clearly rattled, turned the ball over on the ensuing possession.

George Mason turned that turnover into a Hancock dunk.

Then Carter missed a 3-point attempt at the buzzer.

So the Patriots escaped with a 75-72 victory.

Because of a technical called on Altman.

Now I can't be certain what Altman said or didn't say -- for what it's worth, Altman swears he didn't use profanity -- but to me, that's irrelevant. Unless Altman physically assaulted Gaston (and he didn't), no official should issue a technical at such a key moment so late in any game, especially to Altman, who is far from a maniac like Seton Hall's Bobby Gonzalez.

Altman is respected in this sport, and he had not received a technical since 2007. So why Gaston decided he needed one with 18 seconds left in a one-possession game is something the world might never understand, and here's the worst part: The crew -- Gaston, John Moore and Dan Daily -- was assigned to this BracketBusters rematch by the Missouri Valley Conference, meaning Altman got screwed by his own officials.

Terrible.

Just terrible.

But on the bright side, at least he's not coaching Arkansas.

------------------------------

So, yeah, I thought Gaston was out of line.

My mind hasn't changed in the past 24 hours.

And if you don't value my opinion, that's fine. But it should be noted that Missouri Valley Conference commissioner Doug Elgin also believes Gaston was wrong to issue the technical. Steven Pivovar at the newspaper in Omaha did an article on it. You can click this link to check it out.

As for all the questions Brendan posed in his email, I can answer them with one word: No.

No, I've never spent thousands of dollars of my own money to go to some referee training clinic. And no, I've never sat around with refs and spent hours discussing plays. And no, I've never read the CCA manual. And no, I did not know what the CCA manual was until Googled it.

But guess what?

None of that is necessary.

Because what I lack in referee training I make up for in common sense, and common sense should tell an official that a technical doesn't need to be called in that situation, not with the game on the line, not unless it's absolutely unavoidable. By all accounts, what Dana Altman did was the same thing coaches do 15 times a game, which is express displeasure about a questionable call. There is no evidence that he crossed any so-called line, no evidence that he did anything wild or crazy to the point where it made sense for an official to change the outcome of the game.

So again, Brad Gaston messed up.

It happens.

People make mistakes.

He made one.

And contrary to what Brendan thinks, defending Gaston isn't being smart.

It's just another mistake.
Posted on: November 14, 2009 8:51 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2009 8:53 pm
 

Flyers get scare/notch notable win


The best part about testing yourself early is that you have a notable win in your back pocket if all goes well.

In fairness, all did not go well for Dayton on Saturday.

The Flyers got a scare.

But enough went well to help the 21st-ranked Flyers overcome a double-digit deficit in the second half and beat Creighton. The final score was 90-80. All-American candidate Chris Wright got 25 points and eight rebounds. But the biggest storyline from the day is that the Flyers exited with a victory that should ultimately help them A) enhance their seed for the NCAA tournament, or B) earn an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament if they don't win the Atlantic 10's automatic bid considering it's a victory that came at the expense of the team picked second in the Missouri Valley Conference.

Bottom line, it was a good opening weekend for the Flyers.

They entered it 0-0.

They exited it battle-tested and still unblemished.

Category: NCAAB
Posted on: March 23, 2009 10:48 am
Edited on: March 23, 2009 10:49 am
 

The NIT is interesting, relatively speaking

Assuming you're not basketballed out -- and why would you be? -- there are a couple of nice NIT games Monday night.

First, at 7:30 p.m. ET, Kentucky visits Creighton, and though it's just an NIT game, it's still nice to see Creighton get a program like Kentucky in its building. Then, at 11:30 p.m. ET, Davidson visits Saint Mary's, which means we get Stephen Curry vs. Patrick Mills in a match-up of guards as good as (if not better than) anything the NCAA tournament will offer this week (except for a possible Ty Lawson-Jonny Flynn match-up in the Elite Eight in Memphis).

So Kentucky vs. Creighton and Davidson vs. Saint Mary's on Monday night.

Perhaps the NIT isn't so bad after all.

Posted on: March 14, 2009 2:24 pm
 

Am I missing something with Wisconsin?

Nearly everybody in the business of projecting brackets has Wisconsin as a "lock".

Why is that?

Here's Wisconsin's body of work ...

-- WISCONSIN --

Overall record: 17-12
RPI: 44
Record vs. top 50: 4-10
Record vs. top 100: 9-11
Losses outside top 100: 1

Now look at this body of work ...

-- MYSTERY TEAM --

Overall record: 26-7
RPI: 41
Record vs. top 50: 2-2
Record vs. top 100: 9-5
Losses outside top 100: 2

Now let me ask: Which body of work looks better?

The mystery team, right?

That mystery team is Creighton , a school that is either one of the last teams in or on the wrong side of the bubble of most bracket projections. Which is fine, I guess. That's not my point. My point is that it's difficult to understand why Wisconsin is a "lock" to make the NCAA tournament while Creighton is on the bubble when it appears the Bluejays actually have a better profile.

Category: NCAAB
 
 
 
 
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