Tag:Larry Shyatt
Posted on: March 31, 2011 5:11 pm
 

Source: Wyoming hires Florida assistant

Florida assistant Larry Shyatt has reached a deal to become Wyoming's next men's basketball coach, a source told CBSSports.com on Thursday.

CBSSports.com reported Wednesday that Shyatt had interviewed with Wyoming officials and was expected to be named the head coach within 48 hours. This will be Shyatt's second stint as head coach of the Cowboys. He led the school to a 19-9 record in the 1997-98 season, then took the Clemson job when Rick Barnes left the ACC for Texas. Shyatt was the head coach at Clemson from 1998 to 2003. He had been on Billy Donovan's staff since 2004 and was instrumental in Florida's back-to-back national championships in 2006 and 2007.

Wyoming fired Heath Schroyer last month.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: March 30, 2011 3:12 pm
 

Source: Shyatt interviewing with Wyoming

Florida assistant Larry Shyatt is interviewing with Wyoming and could be introduced as the Cowboys' next head coach in the next 48 hours, a source told CBSSports.com on Wednesday.

Assuming Shyatt gets the job, it'll be his second stint as head coach of the Cowboys. He led the school to a 19-9 record in the 1997-98 season, then took the Clemson job when Rick Barnes left the ACC for Texas. Shyatt was the head coach at Clemson from 1998 to 2003.  He's been on Billy Donovan's staff since 2004 and was instrumental in Florida's back-to-back national championships in 2006 and 2007.

Wyoming fired Heath Schroyer last month.
Category: NCAAB
Posted on: August 26, 2010 9:29 am
Edited on: August 26, 2010 10:33 am
 

Butler never really cared about tempo

I spent Monday and Tuesday at Larry Shyatt's coaching clinic in Florida, then spent Wednesday traveling home and writing a column about the experience. I focused more on the concept of the event than I did any lessons learned. But Butler's Brad Stevens made a point during his allotted time that I found interesting, and I wanted to highlight it here.

Stevens was the clinic's first speaker.

He spoke about man-to-man defensive principles.

In the process, Stevens touched on the Bulldogs' trip to the Final Four, and how most previewing games suggested that Butler must "control the tempo" to have a chance to succeed -- first against Michigan State, then against Duke. But guess what? Stevens never once mentioned "tempo" or "pace" or anything like that to his players.

"We didn't care about tempo," Stevens said. "We weren't trying to pound the ball into the ground [on offense and run the shot clock]. We just wanted to be hard to score on."

In other words, Stevens said a review of Butler's win over Michigan State in the national semifinals and loss to Duke in the title game showed that Michigan State and Duke, not Butler, actually led in time of possession, point being that there's no merit to the theory that Butler's goal was to stall offensively and by extension shorten the game. Again, Stevens never discussed that with his players. All he asked was that they prevent transition buckets and "be hard to score on," and that strategy caused Michigan State and Duke to use a higher percentage of the shot clock because the Spartans and Blue Devils had a difficult time getting good shots early in a possession. So the games slowed, sure. But it wasn't Butler "controlling the tempo" that slowed things, Stevens said. It was Butler's willingness to do whatever necessary to be "hard to score on" that actually lowered the pace and final scores, which should come as a surprise to all those who insisted last March and April that the Bulldogs were determined to shorten the game.
Posted on: August 23, 2010 7:22 am
 

Coaching clinic in Florida

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- I'm spending the next couple of days -- i.e., Monday and Tuesday -- here on the Florida campus, and not because I'm starting graduate school. Rather, I'm speaking at an annual coaching clinic organized by Florida associate head coach Larry Shyatt. It should be both fun and educational. I'm glad I'm involved.

Here's the rundown of Monday speakers:

9:15: Brad Stevens
10:30: Del Harris
12:00: Me
1:45: Jeremy Foley
2:30: Jamie Dixon, Shaka Smart, Matthew Driscoll
4:00: Buzz Williams
5:15: Rick Turk
6:30: LuAnn Humphrey
7:45: Billy Donovan

Coaches scheduled to speak Tuesday include Matt Painter, Sean Miller, Travis Ford, Scott Duncan, Mike Hopkins, Brendan Suhr, and Kevin Eastman. I'll try my best to Tweet anything interesting. So make sure you're following me at this link.
Posted on: August 16, 2010 9:36 am
Edited on: August 16, 2010 9:40 am
 

I do not plan to write this week


I'll be out this week, vacationing for the last time until (almost certainly) next May. As always, it's possible I'll chime in on something at some point because I'm not the best at totally unplugging. But the plan, as of this minute, is to stay away from work until next week, when I make my way to Florida for Larry Shyatt's annual coaching clinic.

The clinic is next Monday and Tuesday. Larry was kind enough to ask me to speak this year. Which means I'll be spending two days on Florida's campus with a notable group of college basketball figures -- among them Brad Stevens (Butler), Jamie Dixon (Pittsburgh), Buzz Williams (Marquette), Matt Painter (Purdue), Billy Donovan (Florida), Sean Miller (Arizona), Travis Ford (Oklahoma State), Shaka Smart (VCU), Matthew Driscoll (North Florida), Mike Hopkins (Syracuse), Scott Duncan (UCLA), and Luanne Humphrey (NCAA).

(Not a bad group, huh?)

It should be a nice and beneficial trip.

I'll let you know how everything goes, I promise.
Category: NCAAB
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com