Tag:North Carolina State
Posted on: April 26, 2011 4:02 pm
Edited on: April 26, 2011 4:05 pm
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Harrow transferring from N.C. State

North Carolina State guard Ryan Harrow is transferring out of the Wolfpack program.

"We wish him well and will do anything we can to assist him in this process," said first-year coach Mark Gottfried.

Harrow averaged 9.3 points and 3.3 assists in 23.0 minutes per game as a freshman under Sidney Lowe, who was replaced by Gottfried after the season. According to N.C. State, Harrow will be granted a release to transfer to any school that's not an ACC school. He's expected to be among the most sought after Division I transfers.
Posted on: November 11, 2009 4:49 pm
Edited on: November 11, 2009 4:52 pm
 

National Signing Dud


Wednesday's start to the National Signing Period was B-O-R-I-N-G.

Sure, J.J. Moore committed to Pittsburgh.

And Hippolyte Tsafack committed to Memphis.

And Luke Cothron didn't sign with N.C. State despite being committed to N.C. State.

That's all interesting.

But ...

"The day in general has been pretty uneventful," said Scout.com's Evan Daniels. "There's been a few things happening here and there like Tsafack to Memphis and Moore to Pittsburgh, but in general there hasn't been much drama."

Things will get more interesting Friday when Harrison Barnes (ranked No. 4 by MaxPreps.com) announces his college destination, and Tobias Harris (ranked No. 21 by MaxPreps.com) is expected to commit next week. That'll be two more elite recruits off the board. But it still seems at least nine of the top 25 prospects at MaxPreps.com will not sign early, which is rare. I'll have a column on this development late Wednesday/early Thursday.
Posted on: October 9, 2009 6:36 pm
Edited on: October 9, 2009 6:38 pm
 

N.C. State lands another Top 40 prospect


Luke Cothron committed to N.C. State on Friday.

So now Sidney Lowe has two top 40 prospects from MaxPreps.com's Class of 2010 rankings .

"In the end, the common component [the other schools recruiting Cothron] didn’t have was Coach Lowe,” Cothron's coach, Derrick Bond, told the Raleigh News & Observer's Ken Tysiac. “Just his pitch, his history with North Carolina State, [assistant coach Monte] Towe’s history and how they talked about the past and the Pack pride and the history and championships they were accustomed to, and just getting it back to that, they did a great job of selling Luke."

Cothron is a 6-foot-8 forward from Alabama who plays at Flora McDonald Academy in North Carolina. He was also considering Alabama, Florida State, Connecticut and Tennessee. MaxPreps.com ranks Cothron No. 38 in the Class of 2010 -- one spot ahead of Ryan Harrow, a 5-11 point guard from Georgia who is also committed to N.C. State.

N.C. State's third pledge is Lorenzo Brown.

He's a fifth-year prospect was No. 28 in Scout.com's Class of 2009 rankings.
Posted on: April 10, 2009 7:47 pm
Edited on: April 10, 2009 7:52 pm
 

Worrying with Facebook is a waste of NCAA time

Credit North Carolina State compliance director Michelle Lee for asking a sensible question.

"I think nationally the NCAA needs to address further Facebook and how these groups play a part in recruiting," she said. "Is it realistic for us to be able to monitor them? What harm is a group like this causing? But as the legislation stands right now, this is the position we have to take."

Lee's quote was taken from Friday's story about Facebook and the supposed role it now plays in recruiting. It was in response to a group developed by an N.C. State fan called "John Wall Please come to NC State!!!!"

Is it realistic for us to be able to monitor them?

I love that question, because it shows N.C. State's compliance director has recognized what I've long insisted, that the NCAA would be better off worrying about legit and manageable problems instead of requiring cease and desist letters be sent to fans over stuff that doesn't really matter. Why worry about Facebook when agents are roaming campuses? Why worry about message boards when schools are funneling money to AAU coaches via Elite Camps?

And then there's this: What's to stop a Duke fan from starting a "John Wall PLEASE come to NORTH CAROLINA!!!!" group in an attempt to get North Carolina in trouble? Or, what's to stop a North Carolina fan from starting a group under the name "Coach K" that begs Wall to come to Duke in an attempt to get Duke in trouble?

The possibilities are limitless.

There's no reasonable way to control them.

And that's why the NCAA shouldn't worry with Facebook.

Because worrying with Facebook is a big waste of time and energy.

Category: NCAAB
Posted on: August 5, 2008 1:26 am
Edited on: August 5, 2008 1:46 am
 

Dear Gary (on UNC, Elite Camps, etc)

Here's Tuesday's Dear Gary ...

Dear Gary: I have a few questions for you about college basketball. I know North Carolina holds some kind of tournament or skills camp at the Dean Dome for high school players every summer. Is that the same thing as an Elite Camp?  Also every summer I hear about how our players get to play against UNC alums (NBA players former and current) in pickup games. I know that if you play on/against a professional sports team before you go to college you lose your amateur status. Why can you play against a pro once you're in college?  Does it have to do with the NBA players taking summer school classes?  I also wanted to say THANKS for giving us real coverage of college basketball and the way things really work in recruiting and officiating.  It's always a real eye-opener and NO ONE else does it nationally that I have found. Keep up the good work!

-- Chris
 
OK, Chris.

Let's take these one at a time.

Q: I know North Carolina holds some kind of tournament or skills camp at the Dean Dome for high school players every summer. Is that the same thing as an Elite Camp?

A: I believe what you're referencing is the Bob Gibbons Tournament of Champions, which is one of the more prestigious AAU tournaments. It's an annual event that attracts most of the best summer teams to the campuses of North Carolina, Duke and North Carolina State each May. And though it's another "creative" way to get prospects on campus (for UNC, Duke and N.C. State, at least), no, it is not an Elite Camp. The Elite Camp is something totally different.

Q: Also every summer I hear about how our players get to play against UNC alums (NBA players former and current) in pickup games. I know that if you play on/against a professional sports team before you go to college you lose your amateur status. Why can you play against a pro once you're in college?  Does it have to do with the NBA players taking summer school classes?

A: Those games you hear about are between former Tar Heels and current Tar Heels, and they are OK because, well, I don't really know. I just know they are OK, per NCAA rules. Where schools run into problems -- like UNC did with Iman Shumpert -- is when recruits participate in pick-up games -- or have any substantial interaction - with former players because former players are considered representatives of the school (just like boosters) and are thus forbidden from interaction with recruits. Simplified, recruits can talk with current students and current players but not with former students or former players (but former players can hang with current players all day long).

(Does that make sense?)

As for the part about former players taking summer school classes, well, that's the loophole, if you will. Remember the Shumpert story from last year? It was OK for him to talk with Marvin Williams and Raymond Felton because they were enrolled in summer classes and were labeled as current students and allowed current students' rights. Sean May, on the other hand, was not enrolled in summer classes at the time. Consequently, he was considered a former player and representative of North Carolina, which means he was forbidden from interacting with a prospect like Shumpert.

(Does that make sense?)

Anyway, I hope that cleared some things up.

And, in all seriousness, thanks for the kind words at the end of your note.

You keep reading.

I'll keep trying to tell you how things really work, best I can.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com