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Category:Golf
Posted on: February 23, 2011 7:43 am
 

Tseng Looking To Join Select Company

Yani Tseng will compete for a fourth consecutive victory this week when she tees off in the HSBC Women’s Champions event in Singapore.  How good is that? 

Tiger Woods won three consecutive tournaments at the young age of twenty in 1996 to become the first male golfer to accomplish this feat. The most wins in a row in which a player competed is five.

 Nancy Lopez did it in 1978 and Annika Sorenstam did it in 2004-2005.  The caveat is they were not consecutive.  Each player took time off and selected the tournaments they would enter.

Yani Tseng this week has a chance to move along some selected company should she win. A fourth consecutive victory would allow her to join Mickey Wright (did it twice, once in 1962 and again in 1963), Kathy Whitworth (accomplished the feat in 1969), Annika Sorenstam in 2001 and Lorena Ochoa in 2008.

When you look at the company of women with four consecutive victories, Yani Tseng would be a worthy addition to such an acclaimed pedestal.  The woman has ice in her veins.  She studies the course as if dissecting it with a scalpel and then artfully places the shot right where she intended it to go.

I have seen the likes of Tiger Woods, Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, and Annika Sorenstam and Yani Tseng plays in a zone that like the others I mentioned were able to do when they were winning consistently.  She is flat out scary that someone so small can execute shot after shot and keep distance as well as she does with the likes of Michelle Wie when they were paired last week.

Will Tseng win this week?  I do not know.  I know one thing she will be in the mix.   .

Posted on: February 20, 2011 6:23 am
 

Tseng Three Times a Lady LPGA Champion

Yani Tseng wins for the third time in consecutive weeks. Tseng finished first, this time in the LPGA Honda Thailand.  Starting the day with a one stroke lead over I.K. Kim and Michelle Wie, Tseng separated herself from the pack on the back nine to finish 15 under par.

In Kyung Kim imploded with a quintuple bogey on the par four seventeenth to take herself out of contention leaving Michelle Wie to finish second.

Tseng, Kim and Wie all finished the front nine 3 under par.  On the tenth hole, the 505 yd par five Michelle Wie looked as if she would put pressure on the leader.  Her second shot was perfect on the green leaving her a possible eagle from 18 feet.  Tseng played safe having an easy layup to the green and a very makeable birdie putt.

Playing in the group just in front of Tseng and Wie, In Kyung Kim looked as if she was going to make this a tournament when she too played safe and birdied the tenth hole to temporarily tie Tseng for first place at 12 under.

Michelle only needed to get it close and be certain not to be in danger of losing ground.  Instead she pushed her putt to the right and left her birdie attempt 12 ft away.  Wie ended up saving par (-11) but Tseng made her birdie to once again be in the lead outright (-13).  The tenth hole had been a big swing that Wie would never be able to make up. Kim was now in second by one and Wie two having lost valuable ground she bet the ranch on to make up the deficit.

On the par four 13th hole Kim almost made eagle when her second shot crossed the right corner of the cup.  How it managed not to drop in remains to be seen but once again Kim made birdie to put herself in a tie with Tseng (-13).

Tseng seldom showing emotion played brilliantly down the stretch regaining the lead with a birdie of her own to go -14 for the tournament. 

The seventeenth hole proved to be the undoing for I.K. Kim as she left her second shot right of the elevated green.  Her third and fourth flop shots hit the top of the hill and rolled back.  The third shot over shot the green as Kim shot five over par on one hole to drop back with into a tie with playing partner Paula Creamer.  Creamer would bogey the 18th and finsh in a tie for fifth.  Kim and Webb finished in a tie for third.

Yani Tseng right now is the undisputed #1 golfer on the Ladies tour making her not 1 not 2 but 3 times a lady champion already this year.<sup></sup>

Posted on: February 20, 2011 12:44 am
 

Tseng and Wie in LPGA Honda Final Round

Tseng and Wie in Final Pairing for Honda LPGA Thailand

Yani Tseng won the Australian Open and the Australian Masters in exemplary fashion.  She did it against a host of Korean golfers considered to be amongst the best in the World.  This week if she is to win today she will have to do against the most competitive competition she has faced to date.

Tseng will be paired with Korean American Michelle Wie.  Nobody hits the golf ball farther than Wie in the field this week.  Michelle can reach some of the par fours with her driver and the entire par 5’s this week are eagle possibilities for Wie. 

Just in front of them is In-Kyung Kim.  She led the first two rounds and is a stroke off the pace after round three with Paula Creamer.  Creamer shot a two under par round of seventy to climb into contention for today’s final round.  She looked good.  Her performance was solid and her rounds of 69, 70; 70 indicate that she is not laboring on the course.  Therefore she seems to be a solid bet to be no worse than third when this over and mistakes by leaders could give her a victory early in the season.

Let us not forget the veteran Julie Inkster.  She sometimes is overlooked these days, but the Hall of Famer is 5 strokes back and Webb, Wie, and M. J. Hur all shot 68’s.  Inkster even had a 66 in round one so given her ability to put a number in the club house to beat, who knows then again In-Kyung Kim could shoot another 63 and she would finish right where she started after round one, first.

Posted on: February 19, 2011 7:57 am
 

Tseng Old Tseng Old for Honda LPGA

Yani Tseng eagled the par 5 18th hole to take a two stroke lead over I.K. Kim and Michelle Wie.  Tseng is one round away from winning the first three tournaments of the year and firmly establishing herself as the best women golfer on the planet.

In-Kyung Kim is also showing that Korean golfers are still amongst the best in the world and shot even par to remain one stroke back with Korean American Michelle Wie.

Michelle Wie shot a one under 71 to be in contention for her first win of the year.  Coming to the 18th hole two back Wie place her third shot on  about 4 feet from the cup.  Today she made sure she made it after failing the day before on a two foot put that would have allowed her to be tied for the lead in the second round.  Now in the third round she remains only one back.

The problem is that no one seems to have an answer for Yani Tseng.  Prior to the 18th hole Tseng bogeyed the two previous holes to slip from 9 under to 7 under and in a four way tie for first place. 

Others in contention going into the final round are Paula Creamer (4th) who shot a two-under par round of 70.  American Karrie Webb (5th) shot the tied the best round of the day with a 68.  Also shooting a 68 was Korean M.J. Hur (6th).
Posted on: February 6, 2011 8:28 am
 

Tseng Breezes to Win Australian Open

Tseng Breezes to Win Australian Open

Yani Tseng (TPE) easily held off the 2010 LPGA Player of the Year and No. 1-ranked Jiyan Shin of South Korea, Ji Eun-hee (KOR), and Melissa Reid (ENG) in the ISPS HANDA Australian Open shooting final round 2 under par.

Leading by four strokes going into the final round, Tseng from Chinese Taipei never saw the score closer than what she began the day defended her title by a commanding seven strokes.

Shin currently ranked #1 never seemed to harness the concentration she exhibited all last season.  Given several opportunities to close the gap, twice missing 4 foot puts. The first came on the par 5 tenth hole where she took a bogey 6.  One hole later with a chance at a birdie she again misses settling on a par.

The strong breezes today made approach shots to the green more difficult than yesterday.  Except for England’s Melissa Reid who shot a 5 under par 68 for the best round of the day to tie for second with Shin and Ji most everyone else would have been happy being par for the course.

Lydia Ko from Korea was the top amateur.    

Posted on: July 20, 2008 9:54 pm
 

Michelle Wie and the LPGA

I have followed Michelle Wie for most of her career.  She is an exceptionally fine talent, spoiled, but at the same time innocent.  Perhaps the word is naive.  She has not managed her career well (not her fault because she was hood winked by her father).  As a result she has not learned the first thing about how to keep those around her from destroying the very God given talent she is blessed with.  Her ability as made her the target of those that have worked so hard to obtain talent she has only to hone in order to be successful.  The problem she faces as she tries to work towards being competitive on the LPGA tour is that silver spoon is not welcome.   The LPGA is all about the LPGA and Michelle's unwillingness until now to play by their rules.  I am not talking about the rules of golf but the rules of bowing to the LPGA and giving up her own personal goals.  She will now more than likely have to earn her card in order to play on the tour; and rely on sponsor exemptions to play other tournaments.  What should she do?  If I were her I would go play in Asia and set up the Michelle Wie charity tournament in Hawaii.  The sponsors that want to see her play and win can make a tournament attractive to invite the most competitive because it is not a LPGA event.  As  a result she won't have to look over her should to see if she is going to get disqualified because she left the tent before signing her card.  The tournament could be more entertainment in the vein of a skins game.   The LPGA is using Michelle Wie for their own gain.  This week was a classic example.  I can not believe that for some reason they wanted to hear her side of the story before they gave her the old DQ.  That my friends is bogus.  The LPGA should be ashamed of what happened this weekend. That's all I have to say, it's my observation and I'm sticking to it.
Category: Golf
 
 
 
 
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