Tag:Carlos Quentin
Posted on: December 7, 2011 3:20 am
 

White Sox trade Santos, and it's only the start

DALLAS -- The rebuilding process has officially begun on the South Side of Chicago, and by the time it ends the White Sox could look nothing like the disappointing team that finished 79-83 last year.

General manager Ken Williams took the first step Tuesday, trading closer Sergio Santos to the Blue Jays for pitching prospect Nestor Molina. Bigger steps should follow, with the White Sox signaling to other teams that pitchers John Danks and Gavin Floyd, outfielder Carlos Quentin and second baseman Gordon Beckham are among those available.

In fact, sources familiar with the Sox plans said, it is entirely possible that Danks, Floyd, Quentin and Beckham and others could all be elsewhere by opening day.

"It is the start of a rebuilding," Williams told Chicago writers. "And you guys know I have not used that word in 12 years."

Williams has been threatening to break up this team since the middle of last season, and only a few wins in the final week of July kept the Sox from shopping many players at the July 31 deadline.

Williams then said at last month's general managers meetings that he had trades in mind, and promised to use the word "rebuilding" by January if he could get what he wanted.

It turned out he used it in the first week of December.

The Santos move helps the Blue Jays, who have spent the first part of the winter looking for a closer. The White Sox got back a 22-year-old right-hander with sparkling minor-league numbers (27-7, 2.21, 277 strikeouts in 292 2/3 innings), but a pitcher who the Blue Jays and some other teams project as a middle reliever in the big leagues because of his slight build.


Posted on: December 7, 2011 3:20 am
 

White Sox trade Santos, and it's only the start

DALLAS -- The rebuilding process has officially begun on the South Side of Chicago, and by the time it ends the White Sox could look nothing like the disappointing team that finished 79-83 last year.

General manager Ken Williams took the first step Tuesday, trading closer Sergio Santos to the Blue Jays for pitching prospect Nestor Molina. Bigger steps should follow, with the White Sox signaling to other teams that pitchers John Danks and Gavin Floyd, outfielder Carlos Quentin and second baseman Gordon Beckham are among those available.

In fact, sources familiar with the Sox plans said, it is entirely possible that Danks, Floyd, Quentin and Beckham and others could all be elsewhere by opening day.

"It is the start of a rebuilding," Williams told Chicago writers. "And you guys know I have not used that word in 12 years."

Williams has been threatening to break up this team since the middle of last season, and only a few wins in the final week of July kept the Sox from shopping many players at the July 31 deadline.

Williams then said at last month's general managers meetings that he had trades in mind, and promised to use the word "rebuilding" by January if he could get what he wanted.

It turned out he used it in the first week of December.

The Santos move helps the Blue Jays, who have spent the first part of the winter looking for a closer. The White Sox got back a 22-year-old right-hander with sparkling minor-league numbers (27-7, 2.21, 277 strikeouts in 292 2/3 innings), but a pitcher who the Blue Jays and some other teams project as a middle reliever in the big leagues because of his slight build.


Posted on: November 15, 2011 9:10 pm
 

The White Sox could be . . . rebuilding?

MILWAUKEE -- The last time I mentioned rebuilding to Kenny Williams, he scoffed at the idea.

"You know me," the White Sox general manager said. "You know Ozzie. As competitive as we are, do you think we could accept rebuilding?"

That was a few years back.

Ozzie Guillen is gone. The White Sox went through a thoroughly frustrating and disappointing 2011 season.

Times have changed.

And now the White Sox are . . . rebuilding?

It sure sounds that way.

They're readier than ever to say good-bye to free agent starter Mark Buehrle, a mainstay in the Sox rotation since 2001. They're more willing than ever to trade starters John Danks and Gavin Floyd ("If you're going to trade one, you might as well trade both," one rival general manager said). They'd definitely deal Carlos Quentin. They could well be willing to deal Gordon Beckham.

If they do everything they want, Williams said Tuesday, they will definitely be rebuilding. If they do everything they want, Williams promises to even admit that they are rebuilding.

"I'd use [the word]," he said. "If we do this, I'd use it. Check with me in January."

The White Sox won't have a total makeover. It's not possible. No one is taking the Alex Rios contract, or the Adam Dunn contract.

And as for the players he can trade, Williams said he isn't just looking to fill specific needs.

"There are specific players it would take to get [Danks and/or Floyd]," he said. "Reasonable baseball deals. But impactful players. High-ceiling players."

High-ceiling young players, or exactly the kind of players you'd expect a rebuilding team to acquire.

Williams says this doesn't mean he'd be giving up on 2012. Fair enough, because talented young teams can win.

But with the White Sox very possibly rebuilding, and the Twins in a total state of flux, and the Indians and Royals still young, the Tigers may well be the biggest favorite of any team in any division next April.

"They'd be a heavy favorite," one National League general manager said Tuesday.

And the White Sox -- the Kenny Williams White Sox -- would be . . . rebuilding.
Posted on: August 4, 2011 3:33 pm
Edited on: August 4, 2011 3:34 pm
 

Can the White Sox get a July 31 do-over?

Imagine if the trade deadline were this Sunday, instead of last Sunday.

Imagine if the White Sox were deciding this week, instead of last week, whether to blow up their team and turn into outright sellers.

You think the decision might have been different?

I sure do.

Remember where general manager Kenny Williams was headed, before the Sox won two of three games from the Tigers last week. According to sources, White Sox players believed that if they lost two of three or got swept by the Tigers, Williams would begin an all-out sale that could have included John Danks, Gavin Floyd and even Paul Konerko (who could have blocked a deal with his 10-5 rights).

Imagine how valuable Danks and Floyd would have been in a market short on impact starting pitchers. You'd better believe that the Yankees, among other teams, would have been asking.

Instead, the White Sox won two of three from the Tigers, and Williams held onto his players. He traded Edwin Jackson and Mark Teahen, and explored deals for Carlos Quentin, but perhaps against his better instincts, he held onto the core of his team.

And look what has happened.

The White Sox have lost five straight. They've looked absolutely overmatched in the first three games of a four-game series with the Yankees.

And heading into play Thursday, they were 6 1/2 games out. The computers at Cool Standings gave them less than a 10 percent chance at winning the division.

Worse than that, your own eyes tell you they would have just as slim a chance of winning in the playoffs, if they could even get there. The five-game losing streak has come at home, against the Red Sox and Yankees.

That's exactly what some White Sox officials were thinking last week. The more White Sox people you talked to, the more you realized that they didn't like their team, and didn't see this group winning a World Series.

But they were just three games out of first place.

Now they're not, but now the non-waiver deadline has passed. It's very unlikely that Quentin, Danks or Floyd could get through waivers that would be needed for a trade between now and the end of the season.

So what happens now?

Maybe the White Sox make another run at the Tigers, helped by a schedule that gets easier for the rest of the month (the Sox play the Orioles and Royals next week). Maybe Williams looks to deal some players who could get through waivers.

And maybe now he blows up the team this winter.

Imagine if he could do it this week.

Posted on: July 28, 2011 6:39 pm
Edited on: July 28, 2011 7:01 pm
 

Braves, Phils like Carlos Quentin

With the Tigers' loss to the Angels Thursday, the White Sox head into the weekend just three games out of first place in the American League Central.

Could they really trade Carlos Quentin, who is second on the team in both home runs and RBI?

Perhaps so, if the return is high enough. And with the Braves and Phillies both seriously interested, according to sources, the return may well be high enough.

The Braves are desperate to add an outfield bat, and the word Thursday was that they were making a big push for Quentin. The Phillies' wish list, according to Jim Salisbury of CSN Philadelphia, is topped by Hunter Pence, Quentin and Mike Adams. Many people still doubt that Pence will be traded, and people are starting to doubt that the Padres will move Adams, as well.

But what's in it for the White Sox?

That's more complicated. The Sox could call up Dayan Viciedo to replace Quentin. Viciedo has been dealing with what's described as a minor thumb issue, but he's hitting .307 with 16 home runs and 65 RBI in Triple-A. That's nice, but if the Sox believed Viciedo was their best option, he'd be in the big leagues already.

And that's why the return in a potential Quentin deal is so important. If the Braves were willing to include a few of their top pitching prospects -- the same guys they refused to trade for Carlos Beltran -- the White Sox could become convinced that a deal would give them a much better chance to compete next year, while not totally giving up on this season.

If the Phillies were willing to deal Domonic Brown and one or two of their top pitching prospects, the Sox could do the same thing.

Quentin can't be a free agent until after the 2012 season, so it's not out of the question that the Braves or Phillies would pay a higher price for him than they would have agreed to give up for Beltran, a true rental player.

The White Sox could decide that while they may have enough to win a weak AL Central this year, but not enough to compete in October.

"They just don't like their team," said one baseball man who speaks regularly with White Sox officials.

The Braves and Phillies aren't the only teams that like Quentin. The Reds and Red Sox have both shown interest in the past, although it's not clear whether they are working to get him this week.

Quentin is making $5.5 million this year and would be due a raise next year (when he'll again be arbitration-eligible), so by trading him the White Sox would also free up payroll that could allow them to make other moves.
Posted on: July 27, 2011 1:44 pm
 

White Sox: All-in or white flag?

As of this very moment, the White Sox are going for it.

By the end of the week, who knows?

The Wednesday trade that sent Edwin Jackson to Toronto (and then on to St. Louis) fit the White Sox either way, as buyers or sellers. They unloaded Jackson, a free-agent-to-be who wasn't going to be re-signed, but added Jason Frasor, providing needed help for the overworked Jesse Crain on the right side of their bullpen, and got a top pitching prospect in Zach Stewart, as well.

The bigger question is what happens next, and the answer, according to multiple sources familiar with the White Sox plans, is that we'll have to wait and see.

One scenario: The Sox decide that they're too far behind the Tigers (4 1/2 games entering play Wednesday), or that this team is not going to win in October, anyway. In that case, the Sox try to turn over their roster, making players such as John Danks, Gavin Floyd and Carlos Quentin available in advance of Sunday's non-waiver deadline.

The other scenario: The Sox decide that this division is too winnable for them to give up now, and that this is still basically the same team that they thought could win when the season began. In that case, the Sox keep their team together, and go for it.

Jackson was expendable, because the development of Phil Humber gave the White Sox a six-man rotation. Mark Teahen, the other player traded to Toronto, was even more expendable.

This wasn't a white flag trade. The others would be, and the question the White Sox must ask in the next few days is whether it's time to raise it.

There's no doubt that the White Sox are frustrated with what has been the most disappointing team in the game in the first half of the season. There's no doubt that they're starting to question whether this group has what it takes to win.

There's also no doubt that they realize they're in a weak division, and that their starting pitching could still make them an October threat.

The White Sox are playing the first-place Tigers again on Wednesday afternoon. They play the Red Sox at home this weekend while the Tigers host the Angels (remember, the White Sox swept the Red Sox at Fenway at the end of May).

By Sunday, the White Sox could be a virtual tie with the Tigers for first place. Or they could be as many as nine games out.

That's why by Sunday, Danks, Floyd and Quentin could join Jackson on the way out the door. Or they could be going for it in Chicago.


Posted on: September 17, 2008 5:42 pm
Edited on: September 17, 2008 6:57 pm
 

White Sox could get Quentin back

American League home run leader Carlos Quentin could be back a lot sooner than the White Sox anticipated.

Quentin, who hasn't played since hurting his right wrist on Sept. 1, could join the club and begin taking batting practice as soon as this weekend in Kansas City, manager Ozzie Guillen said. Quentin had surgery on the wrist on Sept. 8, and the White Sox found out today that the healing process has gone well.

The White Sox said that while the fracture in Quentin's wrist hasn't healed, it has "lined up." His soft cast was removed, and he was cleared to work on range of motion drills.

"He's supposed to be in Kansas City," Guillen said. "But I don't want to rush this kid, and all of a sudden we lose him for another month. I'm going to wait to see what he says."

Quentin was one of the leading contenders for AL most valuable player before he got hurt. He still leads the league with 36 home runs, two more than runner-up Alex Rodriguez. Quentin is still tied for seventh in the league with 100 RBIs, despite missing the White Sox's last 13 games.

Posted on: July 31, 2008 5:20 pm
Edited on: July 31, 2008 5:23 pm
 

Griffey was great, but can he play CF?

There's a real chance that Ken Griffey Jr. helps the White Sox offensively. Forget the .245 batting average he had in Cincinnati. Over the last 25 games, he's closer to .300, with six home runs and 25 RBIs.

"You make a mistake, he's going to hit it a long way," said one National League scout who has seen him play this week.

Here's the problem: To get Griffey in their lineup, and to get Paul Konerko (.214, with nine home runs all year) out of their lineup, Chicago has to play Nick Swisher at first base and Griffey in center field.

"Oh God!" another scout said when told of the White Sox's plans.

"I doubt he can do it," the first scout said. "That's a little bit of a stretch for me."

Griffey was once one of the best center fielders in the game, maybe the best. But he's 38 years old, and he hasn't played center field since 2006. In fact, scouts will tell you that Griffey is a below-average  corner outfielder at this stage of his career.

There's a real chance that Griffey will be energized by moving to Chicago, and moving into a pennant race. It never really worked for him in Cincinnati, not the way it was supposed to when he left Seattle to go play in his hometown.

If the Sox could use him as a designated hitter, or even in right field, it would be hard to find any fault with this trade. The Reds are paying most of Griffey's salary, and the two players the White Sox gave up aren't their best prospects.

But the Sox have Carlos Quentin in left field. They have Jermaine Dye in right field. They have Jim Thome as their DH.

Griffey basically has to play center field. I'd love to say he can do it, because Griffey has been one of the game's great stars.

I'm just not sure he can.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com